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Found 12 results

  1. Vivid Audio B1 tweeter repair

    Since I could't find any information on this online, here is some information for anyone else who might be attempting to replace their Vivid Audio B1 tweeter. The Vivid Audio B1's use the D26 tweeters; these are tweeters made by Vivid themselves and used in a range of their speakers. Information can be found here: https://www.vividaudio.com/drive-units/drive-units/d26-tweeter.html I consider it a design flaw of the Vivid B1s that the speaker grille attachment holes are perilously close to the driver cones. The top grille hole in particular is about 2 inches away from the tweeter - which itself is well known for being extremely sensitive to accidental damage. Add a strong magnetic force into the mix (from the tweeter), and miss the grille pin hole by a cm or so and the force will pull the sharp grille pin right into the tweeter. This happened to me a couple weeks ago and caused a significant dent in the tweeter dome, which was irreparable. Anyway, onto the repair. I was unable to find any D26's for sale myself and so I had to order one through my vivid dealer. And they're not cheap at £210 each. This is just for the tweeter dome unit itself and not the tapered tube loading unit that it attaches to. Worth noting - the B1 Decades (and some of the Giyas) use an updated tweeter dome, though the only difference appears to be the dome protection; the tweeter itself seems to be the same. The original tweeters use a "cross hatch" protection (which leaves 4 quadrants of the tweeter dome exposed), whereas the updated tweeters use "integral" protection, which leaves less of the dome exposed. I also received some instructions, which were helpful though did not seem to be fully accurate. These are attached below for info. First, here is a picture of the damaged tweeter in situ: Now, on to the repair. STEP 1: remove the old tweeter assembly The first step is to remove the old tweeter assembly. This is done by removing the locking nut at the rear of the speaker: Looking inside the hole, I was expecting to see the back of the tweeter, as the instructions say to push it forward so that it pops out the front for removal. However, the back of the tweeter I did not see. Instead, I saw this: The light is not great, but the back of the tweeter isn't there. What happens when you remove the locking nut is that the back of the tweeter drops down due to gravity onto the wooden supporting beam inside, as the unit is only held in place at the front and the back. So you have to put your finger (or another suitable implement) inside the hole, locate the back of the tweeter and gently push it forward until the front of the tweeter stars to protrude from the cabinet, like this: It is then a straightforward job to gently pull the tweeter assembly forward and out, until the electrical connection block pops out: Care must be taken not to drop the unit at this stage, as it could swing down and perforate one of the other drivers, which is not part of the intended procedure. Care must also be taken not to bump or scratch the driver enclosure. Anyway, the next step is to disconnect the electrical connection block, which requires pressing down on the plastic level on one side and gently wriggling and pulling the 2 sides apart. An extra pair of hands is helpful here, or alternatively you can use your knee to balance the unit on: Once the block has been disconnected, the entire tweeter unit (dome and tapered tube loading unit) can be pulled out of the enclosure. Here is is removed: From right to left we have the tweeter assembly (comprising cross-hatch plastic dome protector, the aluminium diaphragm (dome), the magnet system, electrical connectors and securing nuts) and the tapered tube unit. Note the elastic band (now broken) which was used to secure the cables to the edge of the tube unit. Looking inside the hole in the enclosure, we can see the foam, the wooden support for the D26 tweeter, and the D50 mid band driver which sits below: STEP 2: Disassemble the old tweeter assembly First, the elastic band (sometimes tape is used) securing the wires to the edge of the tube unit must be removed. Then, the front-mounting o-ring must be removed. Note of caution: similar to elastic bands which degrade with age and become friable, the o-ring similarly loses elasticity with age. Mine broke, and I had to use a little super-glue to glue the 2 broken ends back together: Next, the securing nuts must be unscrewed; one part of the nut is part of the tweeter unit, the other part is loose. Note that you have to give it a tug, due to the pull from the magnets. Once done, the tweeter assembly unit can be removed from the tapered tube: Here you can see the protrusion at the end of the tube which links in to the tweeter unit: Also, note the ring of magnets in the tweeter unit: Each tweeter unit should have a sticker on it too, denoting the testing date for the tweeter quality control, the tester's initials, and confirmation that sound pressure level, PHS and VIS (I'm not sure what the latter 2 denote): STEP 3: Reassemble the new tweeter assembly: Now, we are ready to do this all in reverse with the new tweeter unit: Fitting the new tweeter unit to the tapered tube and securing with the locking nut: I would suggest practicing this with the damaged tweeter first so that you get used to the magnetic pull (as any unexpected sudden movements might lead to damage to the dome). Also note that the tapered tube is able to rock a little within the tweeter unit; this allows both the unit and the read of the tube to be correctly aligned with the cabinet. Next, put the o-ring back at the top of the tweeter, and then secure the electrical wires back down to the top of the tube below the locking nut: Now we are ready to insert the assembly back into the enclosure. STEP 3: Insert the repaired assembly back into the enclosure Place the repaired assembly back into the enclosure, carefully pushing the assembly in until the tweeter unit is about flush with the speaker enclosure. Finally, from the rear of the speaker, locate the back of the tweeter tapered tube. You might have to angle the locking nut down to "pick up" the back of the tube, then lift it up and screw it in. No need to over-tighten, just needs to be snug. Final product: Hope this is helpful for anyone attempting a similar endeavour! Tweeter replacement.pdf.pdf
  2. Hello guys... My appartment is beeing visited to be sold and i just saw tonight that someone put his fingers on the cone of my right speaker... Arf!! First picture is the left one untouched, the second picture is the right speaker (cone pushed in of the midrange one) and the third picture is what i managed to do with moving gently the inner bubble outside to make the cone out again... It seems to look pretty like it was before but could it be affected in any way? Thank for advices... Yes i will put my protect screen for new visits now.
  3. I have an old Bose SoundDock Series 2 that I'm currently using for my setup. I'm finally kind of getting sick of it and have about $150 to spend. I will looking at the Logitech z533 as a replacement. First of all, if it worth getting new speakers if I'm using them for basic music creation and listening to lots and lots of music and if so, are the Logitech z533 a good choice? I was also looking at Micca PB4 2X... However, I it doesn't have a subwoofer. Will it still have good bass? I also have a mic (BM-800) that I am currently use. If I go with the Micca MB42 does anyone have any suggestions for an amplifier/phantom power source that I can use for both the Micca MB42 and my BM-800. My budget is around $150.
  4. Here's a unique little speaker, if you can believe unique in an extremely crowded field. It's a goodie. http://www.hifiheadphones.co.uk/community/threads/v-moda-remix-hi-fi-bluetooth-speaker.4437/
  5. Hello, I recently got a new computer and realized that they did not have any speakers in them. I have set of apple ear pods that i usually use but sometime i don't feel like wearing them so I went looking of a set of second hand speakers. I stumbled this set of Acoustic Research speakers somewhere and they look like a decent set of headphones, but i'm not sure if i should get them because they are pretty old. I'm not sure what model it is either do any of you recognize it? I also read somewhere that Acoustic Research made high end equipment but was told that it was 12 years old so i'm not too sure how much long it will last. Some others that i have asked have said that it looked like it was 30 years old which make me a bit more pessimistic. the seller said: "Speakers are in good condition but do have a few small marks. All speaker drivers are working well. Connected to a phone the speakers sound great." What is the model/sku of these speakers? How much should this set of they worth? How much longer should they last? Should i get them? Are they even good? So many questions, i know, sorry about that. I'm not really an audiophile so my what seems like a nice set of speakers may not actually be nice. Please let me know if they are not. Thankyou
  6. Youtube review: Photo: http://dalethorn.com/Photos/iPhone7p/Speaker_Soundmatters_Moment_01.jpg When I got word of the small near-pocket-size Soundmatters Moment, I ordered it right away knowing what I'd be in for, having had the FoxLv2 and Dash7. Although the FoxLv2 is gone now, I distinctly remember the one thing that made it my favorite small speaker, until it was replaced by the Dash7: The FoxLv2 had a natural tonality for music, and given that and the small size, I knew exactly how to place it for best effect - on a desk, table, or nightstand 3-4 feet away. Ditto the Dash7 and this new Moment speaker. While the designs of these three speakers are somewhat different, the applications are similar, however the intended use of the new Moment is specifically to be in the 3-5 ft listening range for best tonality. When I saw the first announcement for the Moment, I noted the $169 price and the small size, and wondered whether Soundmatters could really pull it off as a value proposition. I'll say this much: If you can appreciate how this little speaker is intended to be used, and you give it the customary 'burn-in' time of 15-20 hours that's recommended for headphones and small speakers, you may well be surprised and delighted at the sheer musicality of this little speaker. One last thing: I've purchased several small Bluetooth speakers over the past few years, and while there are some bargains below $100 out there (and some bad values as well), none of those were designed for natural musical tonality as I hear with the Moment, although I thought the JBL 'Charge' (second or third edition) came a lot closer to that ideal than the others. Nearly all of the medium-priced small Bluetooth speakers are designed to create an illusion of bass 'thump' through various acoustic tricks, which pretty much kills their chance of having a natural musical sound. Summing up: The Soundmatters Moment isn't for everyone, and I don't mean that as a cliche - it's a unique design that offers something the other small Bluetooth speakers don't quite match - good musical tonality in a very small size, with very high physical quality that speaks as well for the brand as does the sound quality. Highly recommended.
  7. Didn't mean to post twice, I think this is the correct forum for this post. I am not sure what size room I may end up with yet, but I'm intrigued about the idea of placing speakers on a diagonal, that is, with their back side facing a corner of the room, rather than one of the short walls. Decware has an article the describes this. DECWARE - Article about Setting up a Listening Room without Treatments I've seen some folks post photos of their listening rooms that are set up this way. Theoretically, you can get better imaging and better overall staging in a relatively small room. Thinking through a couple of configurations will help me figure which room might be best in my house, and what modifications may be required. (another interesting concept is using a closet as a bass trap). Anyone using this 'diagonal' configuration? What is your experience.
  8. Hi Guys, here is the video guide about the Devialet SAM and how to. I actually I didn't know exactly how the "uncle" SAM is working but this is giving some very nice details and step by step explanation how to. Of course it's the short version but you can imagine the rest;)) Any thoughts on this topic?
  9. So, Ive got myself some Polk Audio RTi A1s. Ive figured out that I'm going to need an amp to power them (at least, I think I do). My plan was to wire the aux connection from the back of my PC to a SMSL Q5 Pro, then run the Q5 to the Polk. My questions. Will this work? What stereo connectors are on the Q5 Pro? Are they banana plugs or something else? Will the Q5 Pro power the Polk A1s? What cords do I need? Do the Polk A1s accept banana plugs? (I was planning to buy 50ft of speaker wire, cut it to what I need, then put banana plugs on each end.)
  10. I'm trying to upgrade an older audio theater system with Bluetooth, so I can play music from my phone. Anybody have any experience with upgrading an older systems as such? I'm stuck trying to decide between these two brands. One is Bose and the other is from another good Amazon brand that's a bit more affordable, although the product is new on the market. https://kinivo.com/product/btr200-hd-bluetooth-audio-receiver/ https://www.bose.com/products/speaker_accessories/bose-bluetooth-audio-adapter.html#v=bluetooth_adapter_ht_acc_black
  11. I am doing research for my company. The company is developing a cell phone speaker dock that also sanitizes your cell phone while it is charging or playing music. Cell phones have been found to have more bacteria on them than in a public restroom. The dock produces hydrogen atoms that sanitize your phone and the immediate surrounding area,such as your desk. The speaker quality will be comparable to jambox as we are working with the same manufactures. Our estimated price is $300. Looking for feedback, on interest, willingness to buy the product at that price, and general comments on the product. Thank you
  12. I am looking for powered speakers for my PC. The speakers will be mounted 6 inches from my ears in a customized chair. 5 to 10 watts would be ideal, but all the speakers I looked at in that power range lack base. And the more powerful speakers don't sound good at low volume. But I am no audio expert, I am hoping someone on this great forum would have a suggestion. Thank you.
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