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Found 14 results

  1. We've got some Used Auralic Vega DAC in excellent condition for sale for $2380 (retail $2799). They are in excellent condition and come with a full manufacturer's warranty. If you've been looking for great sounding DAC that can flawlessly play every major format at an unbeatable price, then the Vega is a must listen. VEGA, the next generation digital audio processor, is developed with the goal of 'seeking for non-compromised sound'. With plenty of I/O ports and powerful function, it will become the kernel component of your high-end stereo system. With Sanctuary Audio Processor as heart, AURALiC introduces several cutting-edge technology for VEGA: Megahertz upsampling algorithm up-samples all PCM music to 1.5MHz in 32bit; Femto Master Clock provides an ultimate clock precision with jitter only 82 femtoseconds (0.082 picosecond). Binding with other AURALiC's patented technologies such as 'ORFEO Class-A module' and discrete 'Purer-Power™ solution', VEGA will bring high resolution music playback experience to climax. VEGA supports all high resolution music formats including DXD (352.8KS/s, 384KS/s in 32bit) as well as DSD stream at 2.8224MHz and 5.6448MHz. Five digital inputs include AES/EBU, coaxial(set of two), toslink and USB. The balanced and single-ended analog outputs can connect to power amplifier directly, adjusting volume in digital precision without dynamic loss. The Flexible Filter Mode embedded inside VEGA has six modes, each contains several digital filters optimized for corresponding sampling rate. These filters are solely developed by AURALiC to optimize the listening experience for different music and format. VEGA allows its user to customize according to different music formats, tuning sound best to personal preference. "The $3,500 Auralic Vega digital to analog converter is quite possibly the best DAC I've heard at this price." - Chris Connaker, The Computer Audiophile High End Audio Store NYC - Experience Ciamara1.844.CIAMARA (1.844.242.6272)
  2. For music and movie streaming, Im using Amazon Prime normally. Since longer Im searching for possibilities to extract mp3-files out of this streaming plattform, that I don`t have to rely on the application always, expacially in order to listen to music via devices without internet connection. Anybody knows, if there is a legal way to do so? Do you have some recommendations regarding to specific software programs? Thanks for advice in advance!
  3. Auralic Vega DAC (SALE $2499, reg retail $3499) From Now Until Januray 31st Save $1000 + Receive FREE CARDAS CLEAR USB Cable ($160 value) or 25% off ROON SOFTWARE with purchase "The $3,500 Auralic Vega digital to analog converter is quite possibly the best DAC I've heard at this price." - Chris Connaker, The Computer Audiophile VEGA, the next generation digital audio processor, is developed with the goal of 'seeking for non-compromised sound'. With plenty of I/O ports and powerful function, it will become the kernel component of your high-end stereo system. With Sanctuary Audio Processor as heart, AURALiC introduces several cutting-edge technology for VEGA: Megahertz upsampling algorithm up-samples all PCM music to 1.5MHz in 32bit; Femto Master Clock provides an ultimate clock precision with jitter only 82 femtoseconds (0.082 picosecond). Binding with other AURALiC's patented technologies such as 'ORFEO Class-A module' and discrete 'Purer-Power™ solution', VEGA will bring high resolution music playback experience to climax. VEGA supports all high resolution music formats including DXD (352.8KS/s, 384KS/s in 32bit) as well as DSD stream at 2.8MHz (DSD64), 5.6MHz (DSD128) and 11.2MHz (DSD256). Five digital inputs include AES/EBU, coaxial(set of two), toslink and USB. The balanced and single-ended analog outputs can connect to power amplifier directly, adjusting volume in digital precision without dynamic loss. Features AURALiC Sanctuary Audio Processor Sanctuary audio processor, the heart of VEGA, is based on multi-core ARM9 architecture with calculating capability at 1000MIPS which is ideal for handling multi-channel high resolution music. AURALiC also introduces the second generation ActiveUSB ™ to VEGA that separates the USB PHY into a discrete chip to future reduce EMI from computer. Resorting to these technologies, VEGA not only support DXD format (352.8KS/s and 384KS/s PCM signal in 32bit) but also able to decode DSD stream at 2.8MHz (DSD64), 5.6MHz (DSD128) and 11.2MHz (DSD256) natively though 'DoPV1.1' transmission standard. Flexible Filter Mode The Flexible Filter Mode technology inside VEGA has six built-in modes each contains several digital filters optimized for corresponding sampling rate. These filters are developed under AURALiC's subjective auditory sense and objective testing data relationship models which is to optimize the listening experience for different music and format. The linear phase filter exhibits perfect in-band ripple and out-band attenuation performance while the minimum phase filter is better for enjoyment as it has no 'pre-ringing' effect. There are also slow roll-off filter and several noise filters for native DSD conversion. To maximum usage of these filters, VEGA allows its user to customize according to different formats, tuning sound best to personal preference. Please download the technical white paper of Flexible Filter Mode for detailed information. Femto Master Clock The objective of Femto Master Clock technology is to give DAC and upsampling circuit an ultimate clock with extremely low jitter and low phase noise. It utilizes aerospace grade crystal oscillator, ultra low noise linear power supply and temperature compensation technology to generate master clock with extremely low jitter at 82 femtoseconds. What's more important, the phase noise which affect sound quality a lot has been dramatically reduced to -168dBc/Hz. VEGA has three level of clock precision for customer to choose, with the highest grade 'EXACT' mode, it will give the purest reference clock. Driving by such amazing clock, VEGA can easily reproduce the music details in the 'last bit', represent a rock solid stereo image you may never experience before. Megahertz Upsampling Using latest ground breaking algorithm, Megahertz Upsampling technology process and up-sampling all incoming PCM signal to about 1.5MHz in 32bit depth. These not only improve the precision of DAC, but also create a new Nyquist frequency for all PCM signal which farther away from the top end of audio frequency. As a result, our engineers are able to design a brand new analog circuit structure with more bandwidth and faster slew rate. Comparing to previous design, the new structure is more transparent to audio signal with lower distortion and less noise, it also lets red book CDs sound more rich and smooth. AURALiC ORFEO Class-A Output Module In order to drive various loads, matching different power amplifiers, VEGA is powered with AURALiC's patented ORFEO Class-A module which is inspired by Neve8078 analog console’s circuit design as the output stage. The principle of this module is to use a mass of small signal components with best linear characteristic. By packing them though a thermal balance procedure and bias the transistors into Class-A, ORFEO achieves impressive performance with open loop distortion less than 0.001%. The ORFEO module used in VEGA has been selected and tweaked for lower noise while maintains its driving capability for600ohm load without any distortion raise. High End Audio Store NYC - Experience Ciamara1.844.CIAMARA (1.844.242.6272)
  4. Hi, I'm selling a Resonessence Labs Invicta V2 (with the ES9018 chip on the headphone card and additional frequency rate LEDs on the front) purchased new in July 2013 directly from resonessencelabs.com, in superb condition. It's a terrific DAC / source / amp combo. Here's Resonessence's own description on their web page : "Exceptional Value Engineered with more conveniences than a standard DAC Adaptable for home use or in the recording studio. Designed by the chassis designers at IMWorks, and Resonessence engineers intimately familiar with the exceptional ESS Sabre DAC. Designed, produced, and manufactured in Canada. Provides endless hours of high-fidelity audio playback. Minimal amounts of noise and distortion and accurate frequency response Flexible I/O SD card reader for seamless high-resolution sound enjoyment without a computer. No computer, no noise added into the loop. RCA + XLR analog outputs. High-speed USB, Toslink, BNC, AE5. Supports all major audio inputs and outputs Two headphone amplifiers that deliver pristine sound quality." It's in excellent condition bar a few specs of dust that found their way between the OLED screen and the protective cover. There are a few bumps on the Apple remote that is sold with it. It no longer is covered by the warranty. You'll still receive the original invoice, and a letter certifying the transfer of property in English or French. The internal power supply can easily be switched to your country's voltage. I can ship to anywhere in the world, but will give strong priority to European buyers. If I have to send it outside of Europe, you may, depending on certain conditions, have to pay customs taxes. It will be shipped from Paris. Price is 2400 euros. Price includes Paypal but not shipping fees. I am new to these forums but I've participated to head-fi regularly for several years under the same pseudo. If you have any question, don't hesitate to ask me - I'll answer as rapidly as I can !
  5. The DAC501 is Weiss Engineering's new state of the art D/A Converter with an unprecedented level of sophistication and versatility. With the DAC501 Weiss is creating a new paradigm for what used to be a black box device. A typical D/A Converter is a "set and forget" device. Not so with the DAC501. It adds a number of interesting signal processing features and sports a variety of digital inputs. Balanced, unbalanced and headphone outputs are provided. Weiss Engineering has a 30 year history in D/A Converter design. In that time span they have learned a thing or two about converter design. The DAC501 is the essence of their experiences. FEATURES Inputs AES/EBU or S/PDIF via XLR, Toslink and RCA UPnP / DLNA (via Ethernet) USB Accepted formats: PCM 44.1kHz up to 384 kHz, DSD 64x / 128x Future formats can be accommodated for via software updates Outputs Line out unbalanced on RCA connector Line out balanced on XLR connector Headphone out on 1/4" Jack Analogue One of the latest 32 bit D/A Converter chips is used Discrete output stages for both line and headphone outputs Signal Processing The DSP algorithms can be different depending on which output is selected (line or headphone). Some DSP algorithms have to work differently if they are used for headphones in comparison to speakers. Creative Equalizer - A tone control with low boost/cut, high boost/cut and mid boost/cut. Very useful to correct those recordings which do not quite fit your taste. De-Essing - The automatic removal of overly bright sibilances from human voices. The sibilance effect can be more or less pronounced depending on your speakers or room acoustics. Constant Volume - Adjusts the audio volume (loudness) to a constant value across all tracks played. Useful for "party mode" when the volume control should stay untouched. Vinyl Emulation - Get that special sonic character of a record player based playback chain. Crosstalk Cancelling (XTC) - For the playback of dummy head recordings or live recordings via speakers for an incredible live sensation. (For speaker based playback only.) Out Of Head Localization algorithm - Tries to get the music "out of your head" when listening via headphones. The goal is to achieve a similar listening sensation as one gets when listening via speakers. (For headphone based playback only.) The DAC501 is operated via the rotary encoder control on the faceplate, the touch sensitive color LCD display or the IR remote control. Some additional settings can be done via a web interface from any computer. Controls The DAC501 is operated via the rotary encoder control on the faceplate, the touch sensitive color LCD display or the IR remote control. Some additional settings can be done via a web interface from any computer. Mechanics The DAC501 has a similar size as the Weiss DAC202 unit. The DAC502 version is a larger size unit, similar to their MAN301 unit. The features of the DAC502 are the same as the ones of the DAC501. We've now begun accepting pre-orders. If you have any any questions about either DAC or would like to reserve one, please visit us at ciamara.com or give us a call a call at 1.844.CIAMARA High End Audio Store NYC - Experience Ciamara1.844.CIAMARA (1.844.242.6272)
  6. Altair Streaming/DAC/Headphone Amplifier We are pleased to announce that the Auralic Altair will begin shipping the week of 7/18. This is a perfect single-box music source for your modern HiFi system. It combines a High-End DAC with world class wireless streaming solution. The 15 input sources including stream from Network Shared Folder, USB drive, Internal music storage (optional), uPnP/DLNA media server, TIDAL and Qobuz streaming, Internet Radio, AirPlay, Bluetooth, Songcast and RoonReady. The rest of digital inputs are AES/EBU, Coaxial, Toslink, USB device to computer, 2 USB host for storage and external DAC. The ALTAIR Streaming DAC utilizes AURALiC’s award-winning Lightning technology. Launched in 2014, Lightning is the audio industry’s first streaming technology that supports DXD and Quad-Rate DSD playback through a WiFi network. It also offers several new and advanced features such as Gapless Playback, On-Device Playlist and Multiple-Room functions, as part of AURALiC’s ongoing program of offering regular upgrades that download in the background. Memory Playback, the latest feature added to to the Lightning streaming technology, allows the ALTAIR to fetch and cache the entire track in its memory or system storage in advance to improve the sound quality, and also play locally without the need of network data transfer. Using Lightning DS, you can also stream TIDAL, Qobuz and listen to Internet Radio at any time. ALTAIR’s AirPlay, Songcast and Bluetooth functions provide alternative ways to stream your favorite music from Apple Music, Spotify and other service providers through your smartphone or computer. ALTAIR’s streaming function, operated by AURALiC’s Lightning DS control App, is available on iOS platforms right now, with Mac and Windows versions in development. It is also compatible with other 3rd party OpenHome or UPnP control software for playback. ALTAIR also works as a RoonReady endpoint to use with Roon software, bringing you a new way to discover and listen to music. The unit’s other inputs include AES/EBU, Coaxial and Toslink, and a USB connection to a computer working as a standalone USB DAC. When purchasing an ALTAIR from a dealer or AURALiC, you can add an optional 2.5-inch HDD or SSD for internal music storage, turning the ALTAIR into a full function Music Server. Or, you can always buy an ALTAIR and install the storage yourself. Cosmetically, the new Altair shares the same size enclosure as the VEGA DAC, including a 512x64 pixels OLED Display (although the content is different from the VEGA). A headphone jack is located on the front panel. The Altair is available silver or black. To place your order and/or try one risk-free for up to 30 days please visit us here This order qualifies for free shipping and has the ability to earn 94 Reward Points when you register for our Club Ciamara Membership Rewards Program. High End Audio Store NYC - Experience Ciamara1.844.242.CIAMARA (1.844.242.6272)
  7. In the past 12 months, I had a chance to do some extensive comparisions between various, traditional CD transports and the USB/SPDIF converter. (For those who, for the past three years have been sitting in a cave and do not know what an USB/SPDIF converter is - this ia a device, a bridge that connects between the DAC and a computer, and allows to play music from the hard drive.) All the transports I tried, from my dCS Scarlatti to the McIntosh MCD-1000, could easily aspire to the State-of-the-Art status and are top of the range models from the respective manufacturers. So is the USB/SPDIF converter I used to evaluate the transports - the BADA Alpha USB I've been using, is, to the best of my knowledge, the best USB/SPDIF converter available on the market today. (I base my statement on the extensive tests of some 15+ different USB converters I also conducted in the past 12 months - I can describe the results in a separate thread if anyone is interested). Anyway, the transports I have tried were: $33k dCS Scarlatti Transport: $20k Accuphase DP-800: $9k McIntosh MCD-1000: And here is the $1800 BADA Alpha USB (on top of the Metrum Hex DAC): I have also tried some other transports as well, starting with a $700 Stello CDT100, but those were much cheaper, so are not really revelent to this thread. All the transports, including the BADA Alpha USB, were connected to my dCS Scarlatti DAC using the generic BNC cable. I'm a firm believer in BNC cables, as in my experience, even a cheap, $10 generic BNC cable can outperform fancy RCA and AES cables costing hundreds of dollars. The only exception was the McIntosh MCD-1000, which was used with the Stealth Varidig Sextet AES/EBU digital cable, as it lacks the BNC output. During the tests, I have also tried the matching Accuphase DC-801 and McIntosh MDA-1000 DACs. In the case of dCS and Accuphase DACs, I did not use the available clock link feature (which greatly improves the sonics in all-dCS and all-Accuphase systems) as I was interested in comparing the pure SPDIF performance of all transports, not learning that SPDIF as a standard is flawed, which I have ackowledged a long time ago. The test was as fascinating, as it was ... short. The BADA Alpha USB turned out to be much better than all of those transports mentioned. There was even no need to switch back and forth as we often do to hear the differencies. The difference was so obvious, that you could hear it in the first 10s of a familiar recording (I recommend a recordings with lots of HF energy, like lots of percussive instruments - triangles, hi-hats etc and a lively acustics; pesonally, when comparing different digital cables, digital transports, USB converters or computers, I always use 'La Spagna' by Atrium Musicæ de Madrid and Gregorio Paniagua published by BIS records - a fabulous recording of XV century music; there is also one by Harmonia Mundi, but I like the BIS one better). The BADA Alpha USB made the sound smoother, with ZERO artificial edge, grain or digital glare. There was also much better layering of instruments, and air around the outlines. The instruments sounded not only better separated in space, but also much more 3-dimensional. The resolution also improved quite a bit. You could hear the sounds that you were not aware are on the recording, the HF decays had much longer trails and hung in space much longer. The most fascinating thing was that sound had better resolution, but at the same time, was so much smoother and fluid. Usually, it is another way round. Very often we try a new component or a cable and at first are fascinated by improved resolution, only to find out a few days later (after we had X-rayed all our recordings), that the increased resolution brings listener fatigue and makes the listening far less enjoyable. Not this time. BADA pulls this incredible trick of sounding both more resolute, more transparent, and much smoother at the same time. The traditional transports sounded grainy and congested at the same time. The whole rendition of space just shrunk, as if someone sucked out all air. Once I have heard the BADA, there was no going back. One may ask - how it is possible that a $1800 device can outperform a $33k transport ? For starters, the USB converter much cheaper to manufacture, as it doesn't have an expensive (in case of Scarlatti - EXTREMELY expensive @ $5000) CD drive, fancy box, big PSU with separate legs for the drive, display, servo, control logic and SPDIF out, etc. Since it is so small and has no controls, it can get away whit what looks like a $100 box that can be hidden away. On performance side, I think it all goes down to the quality of the onboard clocks used (and their respective power supplies). The clock stability has a direct influence on the quality of the SPDIF signal, as the whole SPDIF signal is generated using clock as a reference. So more stable clock = more stable (less jittery) SPDIF signal. All the transports I mentioned use clocks that were available 7-8 years ago, when those transports were designed. They were probably one of the best avalable at the time, but are rather avg by today's standards - there was a great advancement in clock art (with respect to their phase noise) in the past 3 years. The latest Ultra Low Phase Noise clocks that are used in BADA Alpha USB (made by Crystek), have the levels of phase noise that rival the ultra expensive Rubidium Clocks. Sure they do not have the long time accuracy of the Rubidium Clocks (the PPM figure), but that doesn't really matter, as what is important in digital audio is the short term clock stability (the level of Phase Noise). Were does this leaves us ? Well, the dCS owners do not really have to worry, as enabling the clock link feature between the transport and a DAC (during the course of this test I kept the clock link feature disconented to level the playing field) will improve its performance. The Scarlatti clock may not be enough to get past the performance offered by the BADA (the U-Clock shurely wasn't), but the Antelope 10M Rubidium Clock is. Scarlatti transport driven by Antelope 10M clock (and needed Antelope OCX clock divider) still gave me the best sound I have ever heard from my Scarlatti system. Not to mention the fact, that it does SACD as well. But for the rest of you, who DO mind spending $50k for the transport, clocks and cables, this is a great news. Nowaydays for ~$5000 (BADA Alpha USB + CAPS v3 Lagoon computer + NAS) you can have a State-of-the-Art digital transport, that will rival most super expensive CD spinners.
  8. Hey guys, Has anyone got/used the Teddy Pardo USB converter? It's an extension of the tried and trusted linear PSU... TeddyU2S - 192kHz USB to S/PDIF converter. | USB to S/PDIF converters | DACs | TeddyPardo XMOS based, although not much else is given in the specs. Currently looking at that, along with the Gustard U12 and Melodious MX-U8. (All started by considering the AP2 + PP, which apparently, is behind the U12 and MX-U8 in performance.)
  9. Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC RS FALL SPECIAL FREE SHUNYATA RESEARCH Zitron Alpha Digital Power Cable with Purchase ($995 value) "The Berkeley Audio Alpha DAC Reference redefines what we can expect from digital playback" -Robert Harley, The Absolute Sound (full review here) "The Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Reference Series is a DAC for the ages. Delicacy, detail, and unparalleled transparency are hallmarks of the RS. Reproducing soft yet present background instruments as clearly as the lead guitar is something only the Alpha DAC RS has done in my system." - Chris Connaker, The Computer Audiophile (full review here) The Berkeley Alpha DAC Reference Series embodies everything Berkeley Audio Design knows about digital to analog conversion taken to an unprecedented level - a level that requires new design concepts and new components at the edge of what is possible. The result is an immediacy and presence of music reproduction that is simply real. They literally designed the Reference Series before it was possible to build it. Almost three years in development, the Alpha DAC Reference Series uses components designed to their specifications that previously were not commercially available. Several suppliers were not able to meet their requirements, which delayed the release of the Reference Series by more than a year. But those obstacles were overcome and now the Alpha DAC Reference Series is a reality. Specs Input sampling rate: 32kHz to 192kHz Input word length: 24-bit Ultra low phase noise Precision Clocking at 44.1kHz, 48kHz, 88.2kHz, 96kHz, 176.4kHz and 192kHz sampling rates ± 100 ppm Two channel analog stereo outputs: XLR balanced with pin 2 positive and RCA unbalanced Digital Inputs: AES - XLR, 110Ω; SPDIF1 - BNC, 75Ω; SPDIF2 - BNC, 75Ω; TOSLINK - Toslink optical connector HDCD decoding detects 16-bit flag at 44.1kHz or 24-bit flag at all sampling rates Multiple digital filter options Balanced analog output level: +18dBu (6.15Vrms) maximum, +12dBu (3.1Vrms) or lower recommended Unbalanced analog output level: 3.25Vrms maximum, 2Vrms or lower recommended Digital volume & balance control: 0.1dB/step with .05dB/step L/R gain trim, 60dB range Frequency response at ≥ 88.2kHz sampling rates: ± 0.1dB from < 0.1Hz to 35 kHz, - 3dB at 59kHz for 176.4kHz and 192kHz sampling rates Distortion at recommended levels: all products ≤ -120dBFS THD+N at maximum level: < -110dBFS Firmware upgradeable through signal inputs Enclosure dimensions: 3.5”H X 17.5”W x 12.5”D This product qualifies for Free Shipping and 5% back in points when you register for Club Ciamara Membership Rewards Program 1.844.CIAMARA (1.844.242.6272) High End Audio Store NYC - Experience Ciamara
  10. 2 months old, nearly used. The perfect S/PDIF converter, read all about it on the internet for all the specs. http://www.audiophilleo.com/specifications1.aspx The AP1 comes in a luxuary alu-box, has an OLED screen and joy-stick for navigating (however it works right out of the box) Color blue. The case has: The AP1, blue coloured 3 plugs to connect the AP1 direct to your DAC, saves a costly cable A beautiful Wireworld Ultraviolet USB cable (very good quality) UPS to power the infrared remote receiver. (You can use your own remote to control the AP1) Divers power plugs that will suit you in every european country 24/192 In the US this one cost $949. This one is for sale for 500 Euro. Shipping within Europa. My location is Holland, ofcourse you are free to listen.
  11. Is there a software that can convert dff to dsf (including dsd256 fs) without any pcm operation?
  12. I just came across the Dspeaker Anti-mode 2.0. I am intrigued, because it has an USB asynch input and a digital output. So basically it can be used as USB-Spdif converter including room correction. I like this idea. I also like that they are correcting only up to 150 Hz or so. But... Does anyone have experience on how well the usb-spdif conversion part is implemented? How transparent it is? I am a bit worried seeing that it only has a toslink output. I would much prefer a properly implemented XLR or RCA output. Any thoughts? Are there comparable products that take an usb input, do room correction in the digital domain and output either usb or spdif?
  13. I am a new member of the CA community and have searched for any threads that may already be discussing this or a similar topic to no avail. I was initially planning on going with something like a Logitech Squeezebox Touch but then I started thinking about using a PC based solution for audio streaming. I am a Network Administrator by trade and also an avid PC gamer. Because of this my home network is very robust (HP and Enterasys GB managed switches all behind a SonicWall router/FW) and the pool of spare PC hardware I have sitting around is extensive (as a PC gamer I upgrade often). I currently have 5 active PCs as well as 2 ESXi Hosts running on the network and over 35TB of unused storage space. My managed network is running several different VLANs and regardless of which approach I end up taking the streamed audio (and eventually video) will be on a dedicated and prioritized virtual network. I have been an audio enthusiast for almost 30 years and my main system consists of the following (not state of the art but better than an old Realistic console): Aragon 8008ST and 8008x5 Anthem AVM 30 Kuzma Stabi turntable with a Kuzma Stogi tonearm and a Benz Micro Glider cartridge Michael Yee PFE-1 phono preamp OPPO BDP-95 Cambridge Audio Azur 640C 6 Wharfedale 9.6s with a Wharfedale 9.CM center speaker 2 custom made subs based on Peerless 10” drivers powered by an Acurus A250 So now that I’m finished with the long winded preface here’s my question: Knowing that I want to get as close as possible to bit perfect streaming of my downloaded HD and ripped CD files (mostly in FLAC format) and the plan for now is to use the DACs in my Anthem AVM 30 would I be better served getting a standalone streaming device like the Squeezebox Touch or using a USB to S/PDIF converter and a PC? Either way I’ll be building a virtual media server and storing the files on a GB networked server and sound quality is the most important aspect to me. I have also looked at USB DACs like the Audioquest Dragonfly, Halide Design DACs and HRT Music Streamer Pro but figured maybe I’d be better off using the slightly dated but good quality DACs (AKM AK4382 24-bit/192-kHz) in the Anthem AVM 30 with a converter. But, I may be way off base here so please let me know if I am. Another option is using the digital out on a good sound card but I figured the converter would be a more flexible and future proof option. Plus I’d like to start off for $400 or under if possible and then after I have a little more experience I can upgrade if necessary (the U-bug hits pretty regularly of late). If anyone knows of any threads already covering this please let me know but as I stated, I searched and didn’t find anything. I don’t want to annoy anyone by starting a duplicate thread. Thanks, Carl
  14. Interested in the facts? One of the world’s top converter designers Dan Lavry has written a new paper in simple language to demystify the subject. http://www.lavryengineering.com/pdfs/lavry-white-paper-the_optimal_sample_rate_for_quality_audio.pdf See why many professional engineers still work at 96kHz years after 192kHz became available. Find out why “more” is not always “better!”
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