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Superdad

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About Superdad

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    Music lover; Owner, UpTone Audio

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  1. Superdad

    USB audio cracked... finally!

    I have both—and the short answer is “no way!”
  2. Great answer John, but I think Sean's question was with regards to the red switch on the ISO REGEN--as this is the ISO REGEN thread. Guess someone has EtherREGEN on the brain 24/7, eh? (That's a good thing!) Maybe you can answer the same question with regards the Silanna isolator at the input of the ISO REGEN and what effect defeating the ground plane isolation with the switch has on the D+/D- lines going through it.
  3. Those are the two dither options I settled upon by ear long ago. (Mostly staying with NS5) Thanks for concurring! I appreciate your explanation.
  4. Wow, 19 or 20? I've had mine set to 22 or 23. I'll try going lower. Which dither setting do you think sound best with Spring 1 Lvl.3 and those lower DAC bits settings? For PCM 384kHz (and I'm a fan of your poly-sine-short filter). Didn't you mean "longer" word lengths with the Spring2? Not sure why the new DAC would want to go even shorter/"lower" than Spring1.
  5. Superdad

    The New CA Issues and Feedback Thread

    +10. I’m always forgetting what thread I am reading!
  6. Thanks Jud. The Banff Springs Hotel (first opened in 1888!) is where we are staying. It's very romantic, close to all three of the big ski parks, and Banff is a really cute town by the Bow river. My wife's birthday is also this weekend and since I am terrible at planning gifts, I'll likely just take her shopping. I think she wants ski boots.
  7. Best how? Most people will be feeding the EtherREGEN from some other switch or router in their house that is handling family computers, etc. While the EtherREGEN will function as a general purpose switch, its ports are most likely to be used for the few audio-centric network connections (music server, NAS, streamer/renderer, etc.). So for that I think our 6 ports (4 Gigabit copper, 1 Gigabit SFP cage for optical or copper module, and 1 über-special actively isolated port for renderer/DAC) will suit most. Oooh, sorry, Santa is going to disappoint you then. EtherREGEN will not ship until early next year. But I promise that our very tall elf is working hard on it and I am working to be sure the parts, the case, and everything else will be ready concurrently. Thanks for your patience. Hope everyone has a lovely holiday, --Alex C. P.S. We are about to close for vacation (leaving our teen/college sons home and taking my wife to ski in Banff, Alberta for our 30th wedding anniversary--we honeymooned there in summer 1988!). Tomorrow (Wednesday, December 12th) is the last day for web orders to be placed (for UltraCap LPS-1.2, ISO REGEN, or bundles of those) and still have them shipped before my trip. I'll be back in the office on the 26th. In my absence, please all try to not make too much of a ruckus in this thread--or in my e-mail in-box!
  8. Yes, I was not paying close attention to what parts and where they we making substitutions. I was just responding to your statement that digital circuits don't have complex power supply demands.
  9. Actually, digital circuits present a more complex load to a power supply as they draw with high frequency bursts. Ultra-low PS output impedance--across a wide bandwidth--is extremely important to achieve best performance. Due to that, physically big and high capacitance caps are often the opposite of what one wants in a digital power supply (high ESR and inductance are anathema here).
  10. Aside from there being many types (some are much better than others, and what you follow them with matters a lot as well), I can tell you that NOBODY else is currently using digital isolators on Ethernet signal lines. There are reasons for that ('cause its not easy), but now I definitely will stop short of further elaboration.
  11. Hi Andreas: You know I like you. But you sometimes lack a polite filter for your thoughts. I am happy to discuss technical differences between products (and the benefits of our from-the-ground up new design versus switches that are just mods of commodity units), but I feel comments such as yours above have no place here in our forum. Every small manufacturer in the audio business needs to make their own way. We like to compete, but we also like to keep things friendly and respectful. I hope you understand. Thanks, --Alex C.
  12. Don’t worry, we are not skimping on any elements in the EtherREGEN! (Though I admit to being a bit price conscious, selection between two performance-equivalent parts usually comes down to which is more likely to be available in the required quantities at production time.) We have a lot of reasons to believe that EtherREGEN will accomplish the goal of near-complete isolation and quality clocking—using true digital isolator chips, something nobody else is doing. And while later on we hope to back up our work with measurements showing downstream (post DAC) effect, it really will be up to users to compare and decide if our product amounts to a “breakthrough” as you put it. On the matter of price: I have stated our desire to keep the retail price in the $495-$595 range (won’t know exactly until the final BoM costs are tallied; we already know that $400 is impossible). But comparing an UpTone retail price to that of most other manufacturers is really not a fair way to compare value. And what I mean by that does set aside subjective/objective performance. I am speaking strictly of parts cost versus retail price. Most firms—with larger staffs, a marketing budget, and dealers/distributors to support—set retail prices at least 5-6x parts cost (sure some go well beyond that, but such is more rare than some cynics would have you believe). The most I have ever set the retail price for an UpTone product is 2.5x parts cost (that includes custom aluminum enclosure, accessories and packaging—but excluding labor cost). So there is that... While a fiber media converter will provide complete galvanic isolation from the upstream connections, that is really about all it accomplishes. There is still much to consider from the fiber back to copper Ethernet and on into whatever critical DAC-connected device you are feeding. The FMCs we have looked at are filled with cheap noisy regulators, they do nothing to isolate from the processing of the SFP-caged module, there is no isolation after the switch chip (or whatever form of Ethernet processor they happen to employ), no improvement to clocking, and no focus on output signal integrity. EtherREGEN does focus on all those things, plus offers one fiber media port and 4 Gigabit copper ports—in addition to our super-optimized 10/100 “output” port. So we will look forward to reports comparing our switch to FMCs. We honestly do not know how significant the difference will be for how many of you. But my personal experience with FMCs versus even the special Cisco Catalyst (that @lmitche turned me on to) suggests many folks are in for a treat. Those single port GigaFOIL devices, starting at $475 (https://www.djmelectronics.com/ethernet-emi-rfi-filter.html) are fiber-optic based isolators, strictly focused on EMI. As detailed elsewhere, we are taking a broader approach.
  13. For those who follow this thread and John's writings, you may really enjoy a great post he just made explaining some about DC-DC regulators, as it does pertain to the EtherREGEN: And here is the followup post I made there: Of course that was a great post by @JohnSwenson. The only thing I feel inclined to add is that while the EtherREGEN board is already up to eleven(!) LT3042/45 ultra-ultra-low-noise regulators (at around $3.50 each in quantity), we may have almost as many of the fancy, low-emmisons DC-DC buck regulators he mentioned. And those too are about $3.50 each. All that does not even include the $15 isolating regulator module that we are using to get voltage across the "moat." It's crazy but the bill-of-materials for the state-of-the-art power regulation in the EtherREGEN could come close to equalling the total cost for the Ethernet switches, magnetics, PHYs, clock synthesizers, XO, digital isolators, and high-speed low-jitter differential flip-flops. And some of the above parts are not always well stocked. I am sitting here today searching stock and placing advance orders for some of the more difficult items. I sure hope this all turns out to be worth it!
  14. Of course that was a great post by @JohnSwenson. The only thing I feel inclined to add is that while the EtherREGEN board is already up to eleven(!) LT3042/45 ultra-ultra-low-noise regulators (at around $3.50 each in quantity), we may have almost as many of the fancy, low-emmisons DC-DC buck regulators he mentioned. And those too are about $3.50 each. All that does not even include the $15 isolating regulator module that we are using to get voltage across the "moat." It's crazy but the bill-of-materials for the state-of-the-art power regulation in the EtherREGEN could come close to equalling the total cost for the Ethernet switches, magnetics, PHYs, clock synthesizers, XO, digital isolators, and high-speed low-jitter differential flip-flops! And some of the above parts are not always well stocked. I am sitting here today searching stock and placing advance orders for some of the more difficult items. I sure hope this all turns out to be worth it!
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