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accwai

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About accwai

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  1. Stangs? This, Ford: Made right here in Toronto, Canada... Only if one got more money than one know what to do with of course But in today's internet age, even the original Ford GT40 could be located without great difficulty. In fact, all kinds of obscure things can be found on the net: Lola T70, Lancia Stratos etc. Speaking of Lancia, came across a first generation Lancia Delta parked in the street of Genoa, Italy earlier this year, among a sea of tiny city cars. The thing was sparkling like new. Not a Stratos but still, this generation hasn't been made since 1999. I guess on internet, you can get anything done if you're crazy enough. As for myself, have been thinking about Toyota Celica GT-Four ST205 WRC for a while. The WRC Group A homologation specials hadn't been sent to North America as far as I know. But after I retire, I just might be crazy enough to try and pull something like that together. In any case, I've always wondered about the quality of available gas in the future. After alternating between 91 octane E0 and 93 octane E10, I've finally settled on 94 octane E10 only. There is one school of thought that goes like "Octane rating doesn't matter, go with the freshest E0 possible." That's just wrong. The difference between 91 E0 and 94 E10 isn't trivial. What can one say... Speaking of which, I've also been wondering what kind of gas restored classic cars would need. News of a fully restored 1943 VW KdF-Wagen has been making the rounds on the net lately. That's Beetle #20 out of more than 21 million. The thing can go down the road normal now. Does it run on pump gas or need some special brew?
  2. Stick shift manual tends to require quite a bit of focus to keep appropriate engine RPM at all times. And whereever one is, one can always carefully shift the weight around, trade between braking and steering etc. That's entertaining enough already personally. Sadly old fashioned stick shift is dying. Autoblipping on modern DCT has made a lot of the traditional fancy footwork obsolete. DCT should in theory open up a brave new world of left foot braking. But in the name of safety, most of them would cut power on gas/brake overlap. So technology is chipping away at the art of driving. In a decade, likely nobody will be doing any driving at all. Then we can all discuss in car mch audio installation at autoaudiophile.com forum while the cars speed themselves down the road at 200mph. Oh well... In the meantime, AWD hybrid that has engine driving the rear and electric motor driving the front seems like a very intriguing way to go. At the top level, just look the cars in LMP1-H class, e.g. Audi R18 e-Tron, Porsche 919 Hybrid and Toyota TS050. These are staggering in both performance and efficiency. In the streets, BMW i8 are all over the place these days. They don't sound all that impressive though unless you pump synthetic exhaust note through the stereo. Oops, there goes the stereo delete As for DACs, I'm a totaldac person. Michael Lavorgna loves the stuff so everybody on CA knows it's garbage. So I'm not going to embarrass myself in front of the distinguished audience here.
  3. Johann Sebastian Bach: Wachet! Betet! Betet! Wachet!, BWV 70(a?)/1 Choir and Orchestra of J. S. Bach-Foundation, Patrick Henrichs, Rudolf Lutz
  4. Vivaldi: Concerto per l'orchestra di Dresda in G minor, RV 577 Ensemble Matheus, Jean-Christophe Spinosi
  5. Tōru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Toronto New Music Ensemble
  6. accwai

    My Essential Classical Albums.

    It's quite obvious the guy is an uncultured audiophile. What could he possibly know about music? And he talks a lot about operas too. Gross!
  7. Giovanni Gabrieli: Sacrae Symphoniae - Canzon duodecimi toni II a 10 London Brass, Philip Pickett
  8. accwai

    Audiophile VS Musiphile - Your Thoughts?

    Thanks for taking the time to enlighten us 'philes. Lately I've been focusing a lot on the sound of this: So in my mind what should I classify myself as?
  9. Johann Sebastian Bach: BWV 36/2 - Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland Joanne Lunn, William Towers, English Baroque Soloists, John Eliot Gardiner
  10. Pablo de Sarasate: Jota Aragonesa, Op.27 Tianwa Yang, Markus Hadulla
  11. Manuel de Falla (arr. Paul Kochanski): Suite Populaire Espagnole - VI. Jota James Ehnes, Eduard Laurel
  12. Johann Sebastian Bach: Prelude No. 21 in B-flat major, BWV 866/1 Blandine Verlet
  13. Thomas Morley: Fantasia I, Fitzwilliam Virginal Book CXXIV Zsuzsa Pertis
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