• The Computer Audiophile
    The Computer Audiophile

    Peachtree Audio DAC•iT Review (AKA DACiT)

    dacit-thumb.jpgI'm not a big fan of blind listening tests. I rarely put myself through blind tests when reviewing products. My standard reviewing methodology is to listen to familiar components for a few hours, or even days, then place the piece of reviewed gear into the system. No matter the price difference between the components I can at least identify sonic differences as a starting data point. Sonic differences are much easier for me to identify after long listening sessions as opposed to short A/B type sessions. After listening to my system for a few hours I switched preamp inputs to hear what the Peachtree Audio DAC•iT had to offer compared to other components. I was immediately and thoroughly impressed by the DAC•iT's performance. There were no glaring and easily identifiable deficiencies. This first impression had such an impact on me that I conducted a blind listening test between components costing thousands of dollars and the paltrily priced Peachtree Audio DAC•iT at $449. The unscientific blind, and sighted, test results were unflattering of my ability to differentiate between these components over a short period of time. Following prolonged listening I was able to identify a couple small imperfections in the DAC•iT but not a single showstopper. Peachtree Audio's DAC•iT is an overachiever that has definitely out-punted its coverage.

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    <center><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/PeachtreeDACiT.jpg"></img></center>

     

     

     

    <b>DAC•iT - Not DACiT, DAC-iT, or DAC-$#!T</b>

     

    The DAC•iT is Peachtree Audio's least expensive Digital to Analog Converter. The unit is without bells, whistles, and audiophile grade gold plating. The DAC•iT has a surprisingly nice fit and finish for a $449 high performance audio component. The metal chassis rests on a sensibly designed rubber bottom so as not to scratch the component or the supporting structure. There are four buttons on the front panel, all of which illuminate upon selection. One button for power and the remaining three buttons to select the appropriate digital input. Peachtree Audio wisely designed the buttons without needless over-engineering. I've used components in the recent past with buttons that looked great and lit up like a Christmas tree but were simply unacceptable for daily use. Operating the DAC•iT's buttons requires a simple push of a finger. The ease of use and corresponding light leave no ambiguity as to whether or not the button has been properly selected. Trust me I am not making something out of nothing. Readers willing and able to attend CES in January should walk the Venetian halls and press a few buttons on the components. Some designers outsmart themselves with overcomplicated buttons. Peachtree Audio has always been prudent with its designs.

     

    As Peachtree Audio's base DAC the DAC•iT doesn't offer everything, it simply offers enough for many listeners. Three digital inputs covering coaxial S/PDIF (electrical), TosLink S/PDIF (optical), and USB are enough inputs for a number of different listening scenarios. I can think of five great uses off the top of my head, AppleTV, Squeezebox, Sonos, PC/Mac, and a server such as the Aurender S10. One of the main uses Peachtree envisioned when designing the DAC•iT was to pair it with components like a Sonos, AppleTV, or Squeezebox. The DAC•iT enables users to upgrade the sound quality substantially in one or more zones without replacing the complete system or spending a small fortune.

     

    The DAC•iT doesn't offer analog input, volume control, or balanced XLR analog output. None of this should be a surprise to astute Computer Audiophile readers. The chances are very high that DAC•iT users have a volume control elsewhere in their systems whether digital through a Squeezebox or analog through a preamplifier. As the name implies the DAC•iT is a DAC, that's it.

     

    Internally the Peachtree Audio DAC•iT offers a more robust analog output stage compared to nearly all streaming devices. It also makes use of the highly praised ESS Sabre 9022 DAC chip. Part of the Peachtree Audio mantra is its components use great ESS chips as one critical piece in components designed for use in computer audio systems. Peachtree uses the ESS Sabre 9022 to re-clock all incoming digital signals. According to Peachtree Audio's David Solomon this re-clocking in combination with transformer coupled digital inputs, including USB galvanic isolation, play a much greater role in a DAC's sound quality than its USB transfer mode (adaptive or asynchronous). I don't completely agree with David's assessment as I believe asynchronous USB is required for reference quality USB DACs to reach the highest levels of performance. Even though the DAC•iT is an adaptive USB design, as is the Stereophile Class A rated Peachtree iDAC ($999), Peachtree Audio hasn't shunned asynchronous USB all together. Peachtree Audio's new Grand Pre ($2,999) offers an asynchronous USB input. However, Peachtree says async is used more because of consumer demand than greater performance.

     

    Included with the Peachtree Audio DAC•iT are a switch mode power supply and a remote control with discreet input selection.

     

     

     

    <b>The Daily DAC(•iT)</b>

     

    Peachtree Audio's DAC•iT is not only a great component for streaming based systems but nearly all types of computer audio systems. I used the DAC•iT with my <a href="http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/Computer-Audiophile-Pocket-Server-CAPS-v20">C.A.P.S. v2.0</a><a href="http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/Computer-Audiophile-Pocket-Server-CAPS-v20"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a> server and the Aurender S10 music server for most of the review period. Using the C.A.P.S. v2.0 server with J River Media Center 17 I thoroughly tested each digital input to determine the supported sampling frequencies and audio output modes.

     

    Inputs & Sampling Frequencies

    <ul><li>USB -> Supports 44.1, 48, and 96 kHz. Does not support 88.2, 176.4, or 192 kHz.</li>

    <li>TosLink S/PDIF (optical) -> Supports 44.1, 48, 96, and 192 kHz. Does not support 88.2 or 176.4 kHz.</li>

    <li>Coaxial S/PDIF (electrical) -> Supports 44.1, 48, 88.2, 96, 176.4, and 192 kHz.</li></ul>

     

    Audio Output Modes

    <ul><li>WASAPI - Event Style -> Worked without issues.</li>

    <li>WASAPI -> Worked without issues.</li>

    <li>ASIO -> Unsupported.</li>

    <li>Kernel Streaming -> Problems changing tracks, static.</li></ul>

     

     

    Listening to the $449 DAC•iT was real pleasure. I frequently enjoy items more, whether audio related or not, when they are such an incredible deal. The entire review period I thought to myself, this thing is such a guilt free purchase for music lovers and audiophiles alike. Many CA readers likely have more money invested in their remote control (iPad).

     

    The more hours I put on the DAC•iT the more familiar I became with the device. I enjoyed all types of music through the unit but enjoyed rock and jazz more than the other genres. There was something about solo horns and the complete horn sections of my favorite jazz recordings when played through the DAC•iT. The horns sounded so appealing as if they were jumping out of my TAD CR1 loudspeakers and into my lap. Throughout the review I had two albums in heavy rotation. First, the newest version of The Dave Brubeck Quartet's Time Out (<a href="http://www.nomp3s.com/Time_Out_K2hd_p/886978835321.htm">2011 Sony K2HD Master</a><a href="http://www.nomp3s.com/Time_Out_K2hd_p/886978835321.htm"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a>), second Harry James and His Big Band The King James Version (<a href="http://www.sheffieldlab.com/sheffield.pl?detail=SL10068">Sheffield Lab</a><a href="http://www.sheffieldlab.com/sheffield.pl?detail=SL10068"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a>). The horns on both 16 bit / 44.1 kHz albums were fantastic through the DAC•iT.

     

    <img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/dacit-black-thumb.jpg" style="padding: 5pt 10pt 7pt 5pt;" align="left">24 bit / 96 kHz rock music from Pink Floyd was also on the DAC•iT review menu. Both The Dark Side of the Moon and Wish You Were Here sounded great. The bass was as wall-shaking as it should be during Welcome to the Machine. David Gilmour's infamous cough, sniff, and deep breath at the beginning of Wish You Were Here were very evident and the opening guitar solo was as lifelike as I've ever heard through such an inexpensive component. In fact, I'd put DACs worth thousands of dollars more than the DAC•iT up against this thing and expect very little difference. Oh wait, I already did. At any given time I have ten or more DACs in my listening room for review, evaluation, or simply my listening pleasure. I don't want to embarrass any manufacturer or unduly influence people not to purchase a product they truly enjoy. Plus, my results are valid only in my system, in my room, with my ears, on the days I listened to the DAC•iT. Therefore I'll withhold the details of my comparisons. The takeaway from this should be to audition a DAC•iT in addition to much more expensive DACs. There's no right answer or correct selection. It all comes down to what people like.

     

    No DAC is perfect and certainly not a $449 DAC. Design compromises must be made to keep the price reasonable. I found three main imperfections with the DAC•iT after listening and comparing for many hours. There is a strong likelihood these imperfections wouldn't be noticed by listeners without other high performance DACs on hand for comparison and certainly not by listeners upgrading devices like the AppleTV, Sonos, and Squeezebox.

     

    Low level resolution was not on par with my best DACs, but was certainly better than any DAC I've heard around this price range. Listening to the Dallas Wind Symphony Crown Imperial track 8 Michael Daugherty: Niagara Falls at <a href="https://www.hdtracks.com/index.php?file=catalogdetail&valbum_code=HD030911111229">24 bit / 96 kHz</a><a href="https://www.hdtracks.com/index.php?file=catalogdetail&valbum_code=HD030911111229"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a> required a major volume adjustment to hear the low level details present in the recording. This track has almost no dynamic range compression and a <a href="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/dr17.png" class="thickbox" rel="dr17">dynamic range score of 17</a><a href="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/dr17.png"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" class="thickbox" rel="dr17" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a>. The track requires very resolving systems to bring out every detail without adjusting the volume up and down for quiet and loud passages respectively. This leads me into my next imperfection, a slightly rolled off very top end. Listening to the same track through the DAC•iT there was a tiny lack of detail at the very top. This track has information all the way to 35 kHz. There's no way I can come close to hearing that high of a frequency. The highest audible frequencies lacked a crispness that was present through my other available and much more expensive DACs. The last imperfection I found with the DAC•iT was an every so slight thickness in male vocals. Listening to Ray LaMontagne's God Willin' and the Creek Don't Rise tracks 5. Are We Really Through, and 6. This Love Is Over were just a skosh more chesty than through the other more expensive DACs in my comparison. Again, I want to stress not a single one of these imperfections is a showstopper.

    <center>Click To Enlarge</center>

    <center>Dallas Wind Symphony Crown Imperial track 8. Michael Daugherty: Niagara Falls</center>

    <center><a href="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/daughterty-freq.png" class="thickbox" rel="daugherty"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/daughterty-freq-700.png"></a></center>

     

     

     

     

    <b>Conclusion</b>

     

    <a href="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/cash-logo-black.png" class="thickbox" rel="cash-ma-1"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/cash-logo-black-thumb.jpg" style="padding: 2pt 10pt 5pt 2pt;" align="left" alt="CASH-List"></a>

    The Peachtree Audio DAC•iT is not without faults but is with many attributes of much more expensive DACs. In fact I am so impressed by the DAC•iT, it's now the least expensive DAC ever placed on the <a href="http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/Computer-Audiophile-Suggested-Hardware-List">C.A.S.H. List</a><a href="http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/Computer-Audiophile-Suggested-Hardware-List"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a>. The sound quality available through this DAC may fool even the most knuckle dragging, card carrying audiophile in a short term blind or sighted listening test. I encourage readers to find another DAC of this quality anywhere near this price. The DAC•iT is not for listeners who require analog input(s), balanced analog outputs, or volume control. The DAC•iT may be the component of choice for readers seeking a low cost, high performing, overachieving DAC from a company created solely to meet the needs of computer audiophiles. The DAC•iT is highly recommended.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    <center>Click To Enlarge</center>

    <center><a href="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/DAC.iT.Back.jpg" class="thickbox" rel="dac-it-back"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/graphics/2011/1214/DACiT700.jpg"></a></center>

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    <b>Product Information</b>:

    <ul>

    <li>Product - Peachtree Audio DAC•iT</li>

    <li>Price - $449</li>

    <li>Product Page - <a href="http://signalpathint.com/index.php/DAC-iT/dacit.html">Link</a><a href="http://signalpathint.com/index.php/DAC-iT/dacit.html"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a></li>

    <li>Where To Buy - <a href="http://signalpathint.com/index.php/Dealers/">Link</a><a href="http://signalpathint.com/index.php/Dealers/"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a></li>

    <li>User Manual - <a href="http://files.computeraudiophile.com/2011/1214/Dac-it%20Manual2(V17).pdf">Link (PDF 2.3MB)</a><a href="http://files.computeraudiophile.com/2011/1214/Dac-it%20Manual2(V17).pdf"><img src="http://images.computeraudiophile.com/ca/icons/ex.png" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 0pt 3pt;" alt="link"></img></a></li>

    </ul>

     

     

     

     

    <b>Associated Equipment</b>:

    <ul>

    <li>Source: <a href="http://www.aurender.com/">Aurender S10</a>, <a href="http://www.computeraudiophile.com/content/Computer-Audiophile-Pocket-Server-CAPS-v20">C.A.P.S. v2.0 Server</a></li>

    <li>Remote Control Software: <a href="http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aurender/id426081239?mt=8">Aurender iPad App</a>, <a href="http://www.bitremote.com/">BitRemote</a></li>

    <li>Remote Control Hardware: <a href="http://www.apple.com/iphone/">iPhone 4</a>, <a href="http://www.apple.com/ipad/">iPad</a>, <a href="http://www.apple.com/macbookair/">MacBook Air</a></li>

    <li>Playback Software Windows 7: <a href="http://www.jriver.com/">J River Media Center 17</a></li>

    <li>DAC: <a href="http://www.berkeleyaudiodesign.com/">Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Series 2</a>, <a href="http://www.berkeleyaudiodesign.com/">Berkeley Audio Design Alpha USB</a></li>

    <li>Preamp: <a href="http://www.audioresearch.com/LS27.html">Audio Research LS27</a>, <a href="http://tad-labs.com/en/consumer/c2000/">TAD Labs C2000</a>, <a href="http://www.emmlabs.com/html/audio/pre2/pre2.html">EMM Labs PRE2</a></li>

    <li> Amplifier: <a href="http://www.belcantodesign.com/Belcanto_Ref1000M_Amplifier.html">Bel Canto Design ref1000m</a>, <a href="http://www.mcintoshlabs.com/us/Products/pages/ProductDetails.aspx?CatId=Amplifiers&ProductId=MC275">McIntosh Labs MC275</a></li>

    <li>Loudspeakers: <a href="http://tad-labs.com/en/consumer/cr1/">TAD Labs CR1 Compact Reference</a></li>

    <li>Cables: <a href="http://www.audioquest.com">AudioQuest Redwood Loudspeaker Cable</a>, <a href="http://www.audioquest.com">AudioQuest Niagara Balanced XLR Analog Interconnects</a>, <a href="http://www.mogamicable.com/category/bulk/dig_interface/aes_ebu/">Mogami W3173 Heavy Duty AES 110 ?</a>, <a href="http://www.audioquest.com">AudioQuest NRG-100 Power Cables </a>, <a href="http://www.wireworldcable.com/products/107.html">Wire World Silver Starlight USB Cable</a>, <a href="http://www.audioquest.com">AudioQuest Diamond USB Cable</a>, <a href="http://www.kimber.com/products/interconnects/digital/select/ks2020/">Kimber Select KS2020 S/PSIF Coax Cable</a>, Generic TosLink S/PDIF Optical Cable</li>

    </ul>

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    <br />

    Why doesn't it support 88.2 or 176.4 kHz. via optical or USB? I've always found this perplexing. I mean, if you don't go over 96 for USB that seems ok, but then why no 88.2? And why not on optical if you have it for electrical?

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    Chris,<br />

    <br />

    Can you please post a picture of the back and the power supply? Do you think an upgraded PSU will improve it even more?

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    Quote: drumstix18 <br />

    How would you compare the DAC.IT to Arcam's rDAC<br />

    Unquote<br />

    <br />

    Same question here. Thanks.

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    Chris did you use a linear power supply on the DaciT. I tend to skim but I don't see a mention of that. Seems mandatory for any dac using a cheap smps.<br />

    <br />

    Edit: never mind, I see that linear PS for 9v are hard to come by. I wonder if a 12v would work? An Energixer XP8000 battery pack would do the trick though...

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    The thing with Darko's review is that he was comparing against the Jkeny 9022 dac and he is a very ardent fan of Jkeny's products, so the review really just ends up being an endorsement for another product. Also as much as I like his reviews and writing it's really hard for me to trust his conclusions when he is listening with Zu Omen speakers which have to have a heck of a wacky frequency response. Not that I doubt they are good, just that what he hears through them via his DACs are not likely to be what the majority of readers hear by virtue of those speakers (provided they are what he uses to review).<br />

    <br />

    just my .02

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    Hey wushuliu<br />

    <br />

    Thanks for the kind words. The DAC*iT was compared to both the JKDAC and the Calyx Coffee because they both deploy the same Sabre chip tech. I thought that pretty damn relevant. All three come in under $1k too, so that loosely sits them in the same animal pen. Comparisons are the key, no? Surely "How does X compare to Y?" is more likely to be uttered than "How good is X?". [OK OK OK, I won't call you Shirley.]<br />

    <br />

    As such I'm finding (absolutist) descriptors such as "the bass was fantastic" increasingly pointless. At the very least, I tried/try to capture the flavour as much as possible. I thought I was enthusiastic about the DAC*iT - it's certainly one of my budget favs - but....<br />

    <br />

    ....it's funny - I can never tell how people are gonna read my reviews. Case in point: I thought it MORE obvious how much I love the Audiophilleo (more so than the JKMK3 with *most* DACs). Maybe that's a lesson for me? That what I intend to communicate and what people understand from my words might not always coalesce. Hell, that might even hold true for this very forum post.<br />

    <br />

    Zu Omen have a wacky frequency response? Where did you see/hear/learn that? I'm keen to hear your thoughts. Either way, the Omen still show differences between DACs. I also use some ProAc mini-monitors AND a Burson/AKG head-fi rig to double-check my findings. <br />

    <br />

    Cheers <br />

    <br />

    Darko

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    Dear Darko, just speaking for myself - sometimes the reviews have a clear throughline and sometimes I find myself reading them over again to pick up exactly what the frames of references are in relation to what has been covered before. In other words, I get lost. This happens most often with 6moons reviews. I feel like I'm wading through a word count minimum that had to be made. But I suppose you are right you do mention the audiophilleo lovingly. As for the Omens I am just going off published measurements from other models in their line and overall impressions from different threads. Again, not commenting on sound quality I am sure they sound great but I suspect they have a very different presentation than the 'average' speaker. Glad to know others are used in your evaluations, I don't recall you mentioning that although I see them listed in the associated equipment.<br />

    <br />

    My pithy previous post aside, I do appreciate and enjoy your reviews.

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    Wow - this <i>is</i> an over-achieving little DAC isn't it? I have about 300 hours of burn in time on one now, and though the sound is still changing a bit day to day, it really sounds detailed and sweet on our systems. Especially so when attached by coax to the Squeezebox Touch devices, but also when attached to a Macbook running Amarra (and compared to the Wavelength Proton attached via USB), and when attached to a PC Newtbook running JRMC 17, again attached via USB. <br />

    <br />

    Whatever filtering Peachtree did on the box seems to work much better for me than on some other ESS Saber based DACs. The sound is detailed but not annoying or bearing a strange sonic resemblance to an ultrasonic drill. The teflon on the frying pans is safe with this DAC! <br />

    <br />

    I pretty much agree with everything Chris said in his review. It was spot on. <br />

    <br />

    Especially about those horns - this DAC is in love with horns. I find myself pulling out music from Telemann to Chicago and being entranced by the horns. French horns in particular, seem to soar high into the air, pulling you with them. Very much like at a live concert. <br />

    <br />

    The DAC does seem to get a bit muddled with huge orchestral works, and the USB implementation suffers a bit in comparison to the Wavelength Proton, adding a thin layer of mist over the music that serves to take some of the edge off, and some of the excitement of the music along with it. YMMV of course. <br />

    <br />

    What makes this DAC so cool to me is that it is affordable enough to sprinkle around the house at remote locations. A SBT + DAC*IT utterly blows away the sound from a SBT by itself or an Airport Express being driven by iTunes or JRMC. <br />

    <br />

    An Airport Express connected via optical cable <i>does</i> sound much much better though. There was no mistaking the improvement in sound when I replaced a a venerable old DACMagic with the DAC*IT in the bedroom. Several layers of scrim just disappeared. :) <br />

    <br />

    Connected to an AppleTV2 and watching Netflix/iTunes videos, we found that the phantom center channel we depend upon was not as well presented as when the ATV2 is connected via HDMI to the T747 AVR. <br />

    <br />

    That could just be because the speakers are positioned correctly for the T747, but we think that there is something else involved. Music sounds very dimensional and the soundstage is placed correctly though the DAC*IT, even when feeding it through the T747's 7.1 input jacks. There must be something different in audio signals from video feeds, even when mixed down to two channels. Again, YMMV! <br />

    <br />

    Thanks for such a great review Chris. I am sure everyone is in agreement when I say how much I appreciate your careful and thoughtful reviews. They save a lot of wear and tear on our nerves. :) <br />

    <br />

    Yours,<br />

    -Paul<br />

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    Would you recommend Bel Canto DAC2 or DACiT for mostly computer playback? I would need to convert USB to Toslink for the DAC2.<br />

    <br />

    Thanks.

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    Nice, detailed review Chris. Thanks.<br />

    <br />

    Didn't you at some point say you were going to review the Phasure NOS1 Dac? If so, is it coming up any time soon? <br />

    <br />

    I think it would be interesting for a lot of folks here, to read your opinion of it. It doesn't seem likely it'll be reviewed elsewhere, and your take would be particularly interesting since you could compare it to the more typical oversampling/upsampling dacs, which you review regularly.<br />

    <br />

    -Chris

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    I really wonder how this compares to the DACMagic Plus? Anyone here has a DM+ can chime in?<br />

    <br />

    <img style="-webkit-user-select: none; cursor: -webkit-zoom-in; " src="http://canadahifi.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Cambridge-Audio-DAC-Plus.jpg" width="238" height="159"><br />

    <br />

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    I just bought one from Amazon (!) - Yay Prime Shipping! With only a few days burn-in it is an intriguing dac. Articulation and resolution of instruments is very strong. I do feel like I am listening to a 'hi-end' component. I also have the Hegel HD2 and Dacport LX. The LX has got an *amazing* midrange and is very musical and forceful - I love it, but it lacks depth. The Hegel is more typical sigma-delta, little splashy on the top-end, good detail and depth. The DaciT so far is kind of a combination of the two, so I am curious how it will sound after a week or two. I am using MF V-link which is connected directly to the DaciT coax input with a rca-to-rca adapter. <br />

    <br />

    I also swapped out the stock PS with a cheap linear that is available from Parts-Express. This bumped performance up a notch so should I keep this dac a more serious PS solution will be needed. Maybe the new diy kit from Glassware or the Salas shunt-regulated supply from diyaudio. Decisions, decisions...<br />

    <br />

    With the V-link the total was $550 (and the rca adapter eliminated need for coax cable IMO). Not bad at all...

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    It seems to smooth out around 200 hours and get more detailed and much more liquid sounding. At around 350 hours of continuous operation, it seems to be evening out and really hitting it's stride here.<br />

    <br />

    It sounds very much like my Wavelength Proton, but a bit more forward. The forwardness is perhaps because of the DAC*IT's upsampling. <br />

    <br />

    <br />

    -Paul<br />

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    A very interesting review. I was wondering (as a few earlier posters) if anyone has any insight on the comparison of this DAC iT and the Arcam's rDAC? Both seem priced reasonably the same and both are on my purchase radar, but what to choose?

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    Here is a very robust 9v linear power supply for only $50 (!). Originally designed for the Teralink X1 and X2, these have been used with other products and are popular on other forums. The seller has been around for a while and also sells a silver DC power cord for use with the power supply. <br />

    <br />

    I am sure an equivalent PS would cost 5-10X from any audiophile company/vendor.<br />

    <br />

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Teralink-X2-X1-U9VA-Linear-Low-noise-Power-Supply-/260908993850?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cbf634d3a#ht_2235wt_905

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    Well I went ahead and ordered the DACiT. My first DAC! Looking to see how it compares to my current two digital sources, my Naim CDX and the Creek CD43. the 43 actually has a coax out so I can also compare the CD as transport vs the DELL PC Serving up AIFF via COAX. <br />

    <br />

    I've only been able to compare the Naim DAC (ndac vs the Naim CDX and the ndac was significantly better. For $500 I'm not expecting it to deliver better then ndac sound however one can always hope.

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    It's sweet, no fooling. Do give it plenty of time to break in. It really started to shine at about 600 hours. :) <br />

    <br />

    Just leave something playing through it with the preamp/amp turned off. <br />

    <br />

    <br />

    -Paul<br />

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