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Introducing Dark Matter system clarifier by Barrows Worm

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1 hour ago, barrows said:

Dark Matter does not "lure" or attract RF energy, it acts on RF energy which is present in its vicinity.  So placement is critical to effectiveness.

 

Not practical to form into sheets which might be wrapped around cables? 

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I just did a web search on some terms used to describe this and found an article talking about how (and this is my layperson's translation) RF activates a reaction at an atomic level between materials, dissipating the energy as heat or however it does. So it seems that thickness is a factor related to size.

 

I have friends at Boeing who work with radiation so this is not new stuff. It's conceptually interesting how proximity to AC power may result in audible improvements. 

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@Jud, not sure on carbon fiber flammability...  But when in a resin matrix is is certainly not easily flammable.  Plenty of wood enclosure audio products out there anyway...  Almost anything will burn with enough heat!  I have seen audio products which use carbon fiber shielding/damping internally.

 

Thera are many approaches which could be used to apply these substances to cables.  The molded blocks could be drilled through, and then cables threaded through the holes.  It is likely possible that flexible sheets could be made as well.  Dark Matter in its current form is encapsulated in a flexible epoxy matrix.  But for it to be made in  flexible sheet would likely require less of the active compounds.  One thing in the making of these is that I really wanted to use much higher quantity of the active compounds than are used by similar products and achieving that requires some cubic area.

If one was manufacturing cables, there are various methods to incorporate Dark Matter.  In fact I am aware of at least one cable manufacturer that applies similar materials to their power cables in the form of a can, or block, around a portion of the cable length which contains the compound(s).  But I am not here to (specifically) discuss other company's products which may be similar.  

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@wgscott, the negative Ion aspect of this is indeed questionable, hence my emphasis on the RF damping effect.  But, Dark Matter does contain a compound which emits negative Ions when heated and/or under pressure (both heat, and movement exist in Dark Matter when energized by EM/RF).  Whether this negative Ion generation is effective at improving sound quality or not, I do not know, so I am not suggesting that it is effective in this.  There are other negative Ion products marketed to audiophiles which make claims that they improve sound quality, but I have no direct experience of this and do not claim such benefits for Dark Matter.  That said, negative Ion production is certainly not harmful to sound quality.

Water around electronic components seems a bit risky to me, especially if used internally.

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if this attracts and absorbs RF energy, I hope you don't have a wireless connection to anything in your audio room because it will no longer work. In fact, now that I think about it, this could be useful.  I am always annoyed with people's cell phone conversations in public.  Those operate on RF, I could just cause them to not work by carrying one of these around with me everywhere I go...

 

Come on.

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26 minutes ago, wgscott said:

If you are able to produce negative (or positive) ions with RF-energy radiation, you really need to publish this immediately, because you have refuted the fundamental basis for quantum theory, and, even more importantly, have disproven what Einstein won the Nobel Prize for.

 

EMSpectrumcolor.png

 

RF radiation is very low in energy.  In order to ionize a substance, you need UV light or higher energy photons.

 

 

Isn't an ionized gas called "Plasma?" Imagine the sound of listening to your stereo engulfed in plasma!

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@wgscott, As I mentioned, i believe the negative ion aspect of Dark Matter to be questionable.  And certainly no way am I suggesting the negative ion production is caused by RF (not directly at least).

Anyway, back to what matters here, which is the reduction of RF energy.

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20 minutes ago, AudioDoctor said:

if this attracts and absorbs RF energy, I hope you don't have a wireless connection to anything in your audio room because it will no longer work. In fact, now that I think about it, this could be useful.  I am always annoyed with people's cell phone conversations in public.  Those operate on RF, I could just cause them to not work by carrying one of these around with me everywhere I go...

 

Come on.

 

There are two testable ideas here.  

 

One is whether one of these blocks, or a glass of water (or a large aquarium -- maybe even a salt water one filled with ions) could change the strength of your wireless signal.  That is easily quantifiable (signal strength).

 

The other is whether reducing RF energy has any audible impact upon sound quality.  You could set up some sort of RF emitter (like a wireless router) near to the audio equipment, note the degradation (if present).  (A blind test where the listener does not know whether the wireless is on or off would make this more convincing).  Once that this positive control is established, determine if the presence of one or more of these "dark matter" blocks is in any way audible.

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59 minutes ago, wgscott said:

 

There are two testable ideas here.  

 

One is whether one of these blocks, or a glass of water (or a large aquarium -- maybe even a salt water one filled with ions) could change the strength of your wireless signal.  That is easily quantifiable (signal strength).

 

The other is whether reducing RF energy has any audible impact upon sound quality.  You could set up some sort of RF emitter (like a wireless router) near to the audio equipment, note the degradation (if present).  (A blind test where the listener does not know whether the wireless is on or off would make this more convincing).  Once that this positive control is established, determine if the presence of one or more of these "dark matter" blocks is in any way audible.

 

Or put it in my backpack and get on a city bus.  See how many people get mad at their cell reception.

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1 hour ago, AudioDoctor said:

 

 

Very cool and I am not surprised after reading this, "He was working on his PhD at UM Ann Arbor"

 

😉

 

I think potential asphyxiation may have been a feature of these tweeters (I believe it may have been only the tweeter?), as helium gas was used for the plasma to avoid ozone poisoning, a liability of other ionic/plasma tweeters.

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I was kind of fearful of the Lansche plasma tweeters when I was in the room with them at RMAF...  Glowing red mass of plasma coming out of the speaker!  They were very fast tweeters.

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2 hours ago, wgscott said:

The other is whether reducing RF energy has any audible impact upon sound quality.

 

Certainly if your cables or internal component connections act as antennas to pick up RF in the form of noise rather than (radio) signal, that could conceivably be audible. The questions would be whether your cables/components would act as antennas for whatever RF wavelengths happen to be around; if so, whether there's enough RF signal strength to be audible (or at least to obscure low level musical details); and whether a block or two of this can be placed in such a way as to appreciably diminish the RF available to screw up the sound. 

 

Regarding the last of these, I would imagine in modern homes RF is fairly ubiquitous, but I wonder whether there are critical areas (something feeding an amp or preamp circuit) where it might reduce RF reception enough to make a difference.

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10 minutes ago, barrows said:

I was kind of fearful of the Lansche plasma tweeters when I was in the room with them at RMAF...  Glowing red mass of plasma coming out of the speaker!  They were very fast tweeters.

 

You might not want to take a closeup of them in operation with your smartphone. 😉 

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I like the idea of testing with an RF emitter.  We need to know the wavelengths of interest, and areas inside a component or of cables that might be effective in order to reduce the dimensionality of the problem.

 

Alternatively, one could simply place some cables in an Xray Crystallography setup, and "set the controls for the heart of the sun."

 

There are numerous RAM compounds available - including as coatings or "paint" -- at least a half dozen of them are no longer classified.  For use inside a component, it should be easy to simply coat a shield.

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3 hours ago, wgscott said:

Although I know of no reason why RF radiation would ionize anything ( it lacks sufficient energy to do this), the idea of a block of anything emitting anions violates charge conservation, so is rather unlikely.

 

Neither RF nor infrared (heat) is ionizing radiation.  Electricity of course can ionize, but AIUI this stuff doesn't make electrical connections or generate electricity in the presence of RF (you wouldn't want it to for the same reason you wouldn't particularly want a glass of water sitting inside an electronic component).

 

So I think Sonore would want to have a solid physical explanation for something we haven't thought of, or consider withdrawing the language about negative ions being generated. 

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22 hours ago, vortecjr said:

It can be used anywhere one expects that high levels of RF energy may be causing problems (close to computer processor chips, for example, but be careful to not alter the ability of high power chips to dissipate heat).

 

Any measurements? Any ability to take one or two and pass them around the community? Are you offering a satisfaction guarantee and return policy that reflects Sonore's confidence in the product performance? 

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45 minutes ago, mansr said:

The only attractive force acting on electromagnetic waves (photons) is gravity. Is this thing made of neutron star material?

Please read MY descriptions, not those made by random posters.  I never said anything about an "attractive" force of any kind, and I specifically responded to one comment which used the work "lure" RF energy.  Dark Matter does not "attract" RF energy.  It couples with RF fields in its proximity (passing through it in other words) and converts some of the RF energy in its proximity to heat.

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34 minutes ago, plissken said:

 

Any measurements? Any ability to take one or two and pass them around the community? Are you offering a satisfaction guarantee and return policy that reflects Sonore's confidence in the product performance? 

1. Asked and answered above.

 

2. No, I would rather offer the product at lower price than provide free samples or return policies.  The cost of such policies is high, I would rather sell it at the current price than charge over $100 and offer a return policy.

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