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Introducing Dark Matter system clarifier by Barrows Worm

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So what is Dark Matter (DM) 

DM is a small, passive, device which damps RF energy. RF energy is all around us, and it can contaminate our audio systems, hardening and sharpening the sound unnaturally, and obscuring very low level details. RF energy comes into our audio systems from the AC line, from airborne interference, and is also produced by our audio systems themselves (especially digital products, and computers used for playing file based audio to our systems). By reducing the level of RF energy present in our systems, we can gain performance in system transparency, low level detail retrieval, and realistic musical timbre.

 

How to use Dark Matter
Experimentation is encouraged, but typically DM works best in close proximity to sources of RF energy which one wants to reduce. So far, very good results have been found by placing it where AC wiring enters components, at the IEC connector, or even better, internally inside a component with the internal AC wires running in close proximity to it. There is no cause for concern in terms of where it is used as it is an entirely sealed in non-reactive epoxy, and no area of it can conduct electricity, the active compounds are all encapsulated inside. It can be used anywhere one expects that high levels of RF energy may be causing problems (close to computer processor chips, for example, but be careful to not alter the ability of high power chips to dissipate heat). DM will be more effective in areas, and around wiring, carrying high currents, so the first place to try it is at the AC input of power conditioners feeding the entire system, or at the AC input of power amplifiers; but again, experimentation is encouraged. DM does take a little while to become fully effective, so the best way to audition it is to place it where one feels it may be effective, and then leave to there for awhile. Then after a few hours of playback, do a listening test by playing a reference track, and then removing the DM and playing the same track again. DM can be affixed to smooth surfaces through the use of some double sided foam tape (use only a small amount, as some of these tapes can be very hard to remove). Or can be attached to cables using wire ties, or can be simply placed on a level surface anywhere.

 

What is Dark Matter made of?
OK, what DM is made up will not be revealed. Suffice it to say it includes a couple of compounds which are effective at coupling with RF energy and converting that energy to heat. There are also some other properties of DM which have been found to be somewhat beneficial for sound quality, including a compound which produces negative ions. There are some other products on the market which work in similar fashion to DM, but DM includes a much higher quantity of the active compounds than most other similar products on the market, and yet DM is relatively affordable compared to them.

 

Snake Oil?

There is no snake oil in Dark Matter. The primary compound is scientifically accepted to couple with RF energy and convert some of that energy into heat. The secondary compound is known to be effective as well. The only valid question is how much of these effects are necessary to improve audio performance in a meaningful way? Every system is different, and no claim is being made as to DM’s ability to turn a bad sounding system into a glorious sounding system, but properly applied DM can improve a good system and make a meaningful improvement in sound quality. The only reason DM is for sale is that it made enough of a difference in tests and it was decided it was worthwhile to offer to audiophiles.

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10 minutes ago, m3lraaHnevetS said:

where to buy and how much does it cost?

Introductory price will be around $73 including shipping in the US.  Will be available, in limited quantities at first, from sonore.us.

Price is likely to go up a bit later, once we get an idea on the demand.

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@feelingears.  Dark Matter is a passive device which damps RF energy fields.  It will have the most effect where RF problems are greatest.  I would encourage experimentation, but I doubt there would be an effect on things like speaker cables (but it would be easy to try there for those interested) unless a system has a real problem.  I use it on AC power delivery, specially on the AC input to my amplifier.  Just one in that position has a beneficial effect in my system.  

I only really have tried it for AC conditioning, but I will be experimenting with it in proximity to digital processor chips, as I know other RF reduction strategies have worked well to reduce RF/noise issues in those areas.

 

If one is not interested, do not bother with it, if one is, it is easy and relatively affordable to try if you are interested in reducing RF interferences.

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9 minutes ago, barrows said:

Dark Matter is a passive device which damps RF energy fields

Maybe Dark Matter Strange Attractor for Radio Wave?

😊

 

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3 minutes ago, AudioDoctor said:

I have a question.  How does it work.

This has already been answered here:  Dark Matter contains compounds which couple with RF energy and convert it to heat.  This is pretty simple stuff really.

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@barrows Thanks for the reply. I'm amazed and annoyed at how much power (or everything, really) matters. But the JSSG360 stuff has me intrigued, and I just found happy results with the new Audience Forte power cable. Although I'm quite close to end-game for me in my room for my preferences, I'm game for a little RF black magic box (sorry) experiment.

 

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15 minutes ago, AudioDoctor said:

You should sell this to the government, they might want to wrap their stealth planes in this stuff.

Stealth tech uses mostly carbon fiber construction to achieve similar effects.  Stealth aircraft and ships also use specific shapes to damp, and reduce the reflections (scatter) of RADAR, so they are using both damping properties and scattering properties.  Aerospace and RF engineers are well aware of the RF damping effects of these compounds already, the compounds used in Dark Matter are nothing new.

 

Carbon fiber is worth more experimentation for audio chassis use, as it is both effective in terms of shielding and damping.

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13 minutes ago, barrows said:

Stealth tech uses mostly carbon fiber construction to achieve similar effects.  Aerospace and RF engineers are well aware of the RF damping effects of these compounds already, the compounds used in Dark Matter are nothing new.

 

Yep, some good old fashioned analog tech and good old fashioned American execution...

 

Curious if you can say anything about the shape of the product. Such a cute little cube! I can't wait to tell my wife, "uh, it's something I found in some packaging...it's just to hold up the power cable...but really it's a black magic audio tesseract!" 😉

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It would be really cool to see some before and after measurements of the device in action. Even if it’s just a demonstration of the concept. 

 

I’m not a hardliner about measurements. I think there are merits to such a box. 

 

I wonder if placing the DM near a WiFi access point would reduce one’s wireless network performance? In addition, does the DM help keep WiFi RF out of one’s audio system?

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Now what condition would make RF leave the cosy confines of a conducted ecosystem and be lured by Dark Matter. That would be an impedance null or a broadband null with a low pass filter. Wouldn't be effective with shielded AC cables though. Yes I would need more evidence.

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2 minutes ago, One and a half said:

Now what condition would make RF leave the cosy confines of a conducted ecosystem and be lured by Dark Matter. That would be an impedance null or a broadband null with a low pass filter. Wouldn't be effective with shielded AC cables though. Yes I would need more evidence.

Shields are hardly 100% effective, but I agree that the best way to use Dark Matter is internally in a component: for example, I use one inside my amplifier, with the AC input wires running directly over it.  RF energy is, by definition, able to be airborne.  It broadcasts from wires.  Anyone can easily demonstrate this to themselves by taking a handheld AM radio, tuning it between stations, and holding it up to cables, wall sockets, light switches (do this test on a typical AC light dimmer switch set to dim your lights and you will think again about having these switches in your home).  The radio test, while crude, will easily demonstrate where there is airborne RF energy.  Try it on a computer and you will gain new understanding of why you want computers located at a distance from your system.  Hold it up to shielded power cable, you will still hear plenty of RF energy escaping right through the shield.

Dark Matter does not "lure" or attract RF energy, it acts on RF energy which is present in its vicinity.  So placement is critical to effectiveness.

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9 minutes ago, look&listen said:

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00050WQ1G/?coliid=I2PG5XLP0OXPKK&colid=1GKZNA4CBLA55&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

 

1 year ago was $115. Not know what happened? But other choices on page.

That device is not going to be sensitive enough to measure the effects of Dark Matter, but it will work, probably,  about as well as the AM radio test described above for folks interested in seeing how much RF energy is in and around their systems.

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9 hours ago, barrows said:

Carbon fiber is worth more experimentation for audio chassis use, as it is both effective in terms of shielding and damping.

 

Is it flammable?

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1 hour ago, barrows said:

I love measurements, but I also accept there are plenty of things which standard audio analyzers do not measure.  To be clear, the effects we are talking about here are subtle (but meanginful) to an audiophile.  They are akin in magnitude to cable upgrades, or playback software changes, or different oversampling approaches:  I have never seen any measurements with standard audio analyzers show differences of things like this (at least in the audible bandwidth).  I would suggest that Dark Matter is not for those audiophiles who feel that 18 AWG zip wire from the local hardware store makes perfect speaker cabling.

 

 

I use my best measurement instruments: my ears with all their inherent distinctive pros and cons.

 

Audiophiles almost cannot talk about the intangibles I hear (and I know some of you hear too) around how dimensionality occurs, or the "thickness" of the sound around, say, a frequency that is a violin (for simplicity's sake). So, since we all cannot use the same language, we must just use our ears and after many years of learning to hear, I trust my mine.

 

In this hobby, $75 is within my interest level. Joe Bob says, "Check it out!" 

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