Jump to content
Computer Audiophile
  • The Computer Audiophile
    The Computer Audiophile

    Notes From a Disconnected Axpona

    This is not a show report. 

     

    I'm well aware that show reports are great click bait and drive a large amount of traffic, but I'm just not feeling it right now. I've been dreading writing something about Axpona all week. Not because I didn't have a good time at the show. I've been hesitant because I had a really good time at the show and it didn't revolve around 99.9% of the rooms and equipment on display. Writing show reports with sonic assessments and pretty equipment pictures doesn't excite me (for the most part). Noisy hotel rooms and really bad acoustics don't lead to good conditions for listening to music and assessing equipment. Kid yourself all you want, I'm just stating the facts. Some rooms at the show were a breath of fresh air, where sonic assessments were possible. I'll get to those in a bit. What I really want to discuss is a huge disconnect between consumers and "the industry." 

     

    First, a little background. At 5:30 PM on the first day of the show, I ran into CA contributor ted_b. He mentioned that a group of people from the CA community were meeting in the bar and he invited me to attend. Of course I was all in. This is the best part of my job, meeting the people with which I have so much in common and those who make this job possible. Over the course of an hour we all struggled to get words in because there was so much to discuss. I felt like these guys were friends I hadn't seen in twenty years. 

     

    We discussed a couple rooms that were enjoyable and a couple components on our recommended lists. However, for much of the conversation we all talked about music. And here's the disconnect, nobody talked about Diana Krall, Rebecca Pidgeon, or the latest quad DSD or 24/384 recording of a guy beating tree trunks with Japanese urushi drumsticks. If you like that stuff, I'm very happy for you because you'll be in heaven at a HiFi show. We all talked about music made by the likes of David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Blind faith, Radiohead, Led Zeppelin, Pearl Jam, and Prince. I have to ask, why is it that none of these artists graced a single playlist in any of the rooms in which I visited?

     

    Talk about disconnect. Not only did our group of people enjoy "real" music rather than stereotypical audiophile crap, so did many of the people I talked to within the industry. I can't count how many times I've been told by people putting on demonstrations, that they'd rather stick pencils in their necks than listen to Hugh Masekela one more time. Here's a tip - STOP PLAYING IT! 

     

    Why does the industry cater to one segment of consumers, to the detriment of all others? HiFi is a small niche. Within this niche is another niche of people who like traditional audiophile music. As an industry we cater to to that niche within a niche, yet we complain about not attracting more civilians to our hobby. Hello! When is the last time you visited an unpleasant place and thought, "I should go back there again." An audio show where people bring significant others and children, should be about reaching out, not fighting over the last members of a dying breed (literally). 

     

    After the second day of the show, I met up with a longtime member of the CA community, who was actually in attendance at the Computer Audiophile Symposium at Fantasy Studios in Berkeley, CA back in 2009. It was great to talk with him about the show and all things HiFi. It was interesting to hear his opinion about entering the rooms and listening to whatever music was playing. He is a shy guy and didn't feel comfortable asking for specific music. Some of us who have been to way too many HiFi shows are totally fine with playing our own music, but I don't think we are in the majority. Why does the industry make people feel that playing Beyonce at a HiFi show is sacrilegious? I told this member of the CA community that I played Beyonce's Formation in the Quintessence Audio room on the 12th floor, and he sounded excited but a little sad that he missed it or couldn't do so himself. 

     

    Another item we discussed is value in HiFi and the prices of equipment. Neither of us have an issue with high priced equipment or even stratospherically priced equipment. Manufacturers only build what customers want and if customers can afford it, that's excellent. Heck, I wish I could afford more of the stuff about which I write. I relayed a story about the time I was fresh out of college in the late 1990s and saw/heard a pair of B&W Nautilus 802 loudspeakers at a local dealer for the first time. The speakers were $8,000. I was an aspirational buyer at the time, with a job that didn't put me in the top tax bracket. I started putting money away and months later I purchased a pair of the 802s. I remember it like yesterday. 

     

    Sure $8,000 is a lot of money, but it was an obtainable amount for a guy working in IT right out of college (without kids or a house payment). Without objective data to support my opinion, I expressed that I thought much of HiFi was beyond the reach of aspirational buyers today. After the conversation I pulled up an inflation calculator to compare what the adjusted price of the 802 speakers would be in today's dollars and the current retail price. I realized this wasn't a longitudinal study and was full of irregularities, but it would give me one data point. I believe I bought the speakers in 1999 for $8,000. In today's dollars that would be $11,727 according to this calculator. The MSRP of a new pair of B&W 802 D3 loudspeakers in 2017 is $22,000. I have a hard time believing that a version of me, fresh out of college today, could even be an aspirational buyer of the B&W 802s. 

     

    Our discussion also touched on value. Value is a tough one because it's so subjective. A value for me isn't a value for my neighbor. However, this doesn't mean the subject is off limits. I don't mind spending a lot of money on something if there is perceived value. Streaming a couple movies on a private jet over the Atlantic ocean for $10,000 in data charges has no value to me (true story, not my money). Spending the same amount of money to put local storage of movies in that same jet has much more value. Ten grand is pocket change to some people, but those people don't like to waste money any more than me. 

     

    The $2,299 Schiit Audio Yggdrasil doesn't cost a lot of money for many people in this hobby, but it's more money that most civilians have in the bank. By most standards it's expensive, but I also consider it an incredible value. On the other hand, there are components and speakers that combine to make systems at or above $1,000,000. I completely understand the cost of goods made in small quantities, and the value of exclusivity etc... but comparing all the items one million dollars could purchase, makes me struggle to find value in a $1,000,000 audio system. A couple houses, a few Ferraris, a few outstanding college educations, etc... I would probably be much more inclined to see value in such an expensive audio system if I heard a demonstration and it was the best system I'd ever heard. Not the best system by 90%, but just the best system period. Even if it was only 5% better than a much cheaper system. At Axpona, there were some systems that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. I won't judge them based on the terrible show conditions, but based on my experience I can say there is little value in these systems as a whole. 


    Another disconnect I ran into at the show involved me sitting through 30 minutes of misinformation from a manufacturer. I entered his room, interested in a new product. There were other people listening to music and asking questions when I entered. I quietly sat on the side and listened to the conversations until I was asked a specific question, to which I gave an honest answer. The manufacturer was going on and on about how USB is the worst interface and he couldn't even listen to music through USB. Then he started in with DSD versus PCM and how one was clearly superior. Then he honestly told people that Tidal compressed the dynamic range of music more than the CD of the same music. As if someone at Tidal remastered millions of albums, but was able to somehow keep them bit-identical to the CD versions (I've tested this). This guy wasn't talking about data compression and FLAC, he was talking about dynamic range compression. I know this because he later went into data compression and why it's also the devil. 

     

    The bottom line is this, we had one guy telling people everything they are doing is wrong. Not only this, but he was using alternative facts to justify his statements. I don't care if he isn't a fan of USB interfaces. I do care that he was spewing misinformation to people who will spread that misinformation and cause others to waste money on needless upgrades and very possibly get turned off of this hobby eventually because of this crap. Misinformation isn't a successful longterm strategy.  

     

    In this same room, I had a writer from another publication engage me in a conversation about MQA. I don't remember who he was or what publication he wrote for and chances are good he has no idea who I am or what publication for which I write. No biggie. Anyway, this guy was 100% certain that MQA was first decoded by the USB interface, in addition to other things. I tried to provide some information about how MQA works and that USB has nothing to do with MQA, but he wasn't hearing any of it. In his mind he was right and he was there to spread the word. It was awkward in that room. Between the main conversations and my side conversation, I was turned off. Things like this don't happen in every room, but they happen more often that most people could imagine. It's things like this that are draining and they get old. This was an audio show. A pinnacle of HiFi performance where people from the area gather once per year to hear and see the best in the world, and talk amongst like-minded individuals. We should stop complaining about flaws in technologies such as USB, as if all other technologies are flawless, or the difficulty of computer networking, and start leading as an industry. Give people what they pay for and show them how to get the best out of any technology. Right now, I'm willing to bet the local Best Buy offers a better experience than Axpona and many HiFi shops. Networking and computers aren't the antithesis of audio and music reproduction. They aren't rocket science either. In 30 minutes the kid at best buy could have someone setup with a working wireless network and an audio system. It may not be the best, but it's better than the system the HiFi industry complains about and pushes away as if it's leprosy. OK, that was a little side rant that could the subject of an entire editorial, but I'll save it for another day.  


    Let's talk about the good times at Axpona. First and foremost, I enjoyed the Quintessence Audio room on the 12th floor (straight off the elevators), more than all other rooms combined. The room featured Dynaudio Contour 60 loudspeakers and a serious stack of Moon by Simaudio components. The digital source was an Aurender. The team at Quintessence really setup the room well, enabling people to hear the system more than the acoustics of the room. One afternoon the guys in the room let me control the playlist for what seemed like an hour. I kept queuing up tracks and listening like I was at home. Playing all my favorite music. Sure, a few people walked in and were scared off by Iggy Azalea's latest single Mo Bounce, but I would have been scared off by their Nils Lofgren albums had the situation been reversed. I played everything from Pearl Jam to Peter, Paul and Mary. I really liked how everything sounded in this room. The Moon gear was wonderful as usual. I really think the Dynaudio Contour 60 loudspeakers offer a great value and should have a long life for the company. Yes they are $10,000, but the equivalent speakers from other brands are double that price. 

     

    Imagine if civilian show-goers could have had the same fun experience that I had in the Quintessence room rather than disturbing the peace by walking in on a 32/768 kHz rendition of Kazakhstan Wind Chimes being listened to by some reviewer who has been in the business since I was nine years old, who expects the world to stop when he is listening. This isn't far from what I experienced at Axpona. A reviewer asked if anyone could name the music he played and some guy said, "that wasn't music!" He was right, it was a bunch of banging on things in high resolution. If people like that stuff, no worries. It's just not the kind of stuff that the people I know like and it's certainly not the kind of stuff that will attract anyone to this hobby. 

     

    Another room I really enjoyed featured Doshi analog components, dCS digital components, and Wilson Audio Yvette loudspeakers with Transparent cabling throughout. The system was setup well, even though the room was less than ideal. Nick Doshi was playing some jazz through the dCS gear, and I was mesmerized. I have no clue what album it was or even who the artist was, but I sat there enjoying the whole thing. It was an old school jazz club recording with stand-up bass and drums and improvisation. Great stuff. I remember listening and thinking that I needed to consider Doshi components and the Yvette loudspeakers in my system (the dCS is already here). That's how powerful good music is on a good system. I really hope civilians had the same experience in that room. After several minutes of the great jazz album, another guy working the room said he had some Donal Fagan queued up. I couldn't help but to speak up to say I was completely satisfied with the current track and that I'd heard Donald Fagan about 1000 times at shows in the past. Thus, I'd rather not hear Morph the Cat again. Anyway, this room was a blast that made me rethink my current system.  

     

     

    Wrap-up

     

    I'm not holier than thou. I don't care why you are into this hobby. For music, for gear, or to spend all the money you inherited or married into, is of no concern to me. I honestly really don't care. I'm the most nonjudgemental person you'll ever meet. If you like HiFi because it looks cool and impresses your friends, I am honestly happy because it's making you happy. This editorial wasn't meant as an indictment on the motives of my fellow audiophiles. Rather, it was to express a little frustration about a big disconnect in the industry. Axpona wasn't the cause and wasn't the first place I witnessed this disconnect. It just sparked me to write this editorial. Perhaps the time spent with a few really smart guys in the industry sparked me to write this as well. There are a few guys in the industry who aren't clinging to the old way of doing business and who have great vision for the future. These guys inspired me at Axpona and made me realize this wonderful hobby will survive, but not in its current form. 

     

    People in the industry should ask themselves if they are having fun at these audio shows. The chances are high that the answer would be no. If they aren't having fun, how do they expect potential customers to have fun? As an industry, can we cater to more demographics than those on deck for the nursing home? That's not a slight against older people. I tell my five year old daughter all the time that older people are the best because they have so much experience and so many good stories from which she can learn. As an industry, can we cater to the music lover who is capable of talking about music with other people over a few beers at the bar, in addition to the guy with literally 10 CDs (5 of them different versions of Jazz at the Pawnshop)? 

     

    Let's close the gap between HiFi and everyone else on the planet. Music is a universal language that brings people together, unless it has been outlawed by those who see its power to change the world. 

     

     

     

    P.S. After writing this I questioned whether it should be published. I don't want to be seen as just another guy in the industry ranting about the industry. The industry is full of blowhards who do a great job of this already. Hopefully others will see at least a tiny bit of value in this editorial or at least get some enjoyment out of it or make a connection with some of my experiences. Please remember. I'm in this for the long haul. It's a marathon, not a sprint. I'm not the Minister of Information. I'm here for you, you aren't here for me. 



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Chris, thanks for the article and it has been something I've been saying at Headfi meets and audio shows I have been to or run. It is great to listen to "audiophile" recordings but I also want to listen to the music I am going to listen to at home. 

     

    I'll never forget the reaction I got at Sound by Singer when I brought in my CDs to demo speakers back in the day. I wanted to hear what a speaker could do with everything from RATM debut to PJ10 to Eric Johnson Ah Viacom to Miles Davis to Biohazard. They were not amused but tolerated the demo from a mid twenties guy with limited funds. I love listening to what a system can do with optimally recorded music but I also need to understand if that same system will fall apart when I on Led Zeppelin. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    First off awesome article Chris!  I couldn't agree with you more!

     

    I attend AXPONA b/c it's the one chance I get the opportunity to hear exciting new (high end) gear that I can only dream of affording.  I fall into the category that can't afford the $10,000 speakers but it gives me a perspective into some gear that I might be able to afford in a few years when I buy it used.

     

    I attended AXPONA the first 2 years it started and took the next couple off due to the fact nothing changed.  This year I was excited because I got to hear every high end speaker that I ever wanted so that should hold me for the next few years.

     

    Getting back to your article Chris, I think the age gap you mentioned in the article is HUGE! In the rooms I enjoyed the most were the rooms that had someone around my age or younger playing the music and was playing music that I actually listen to that made me want to stay.  I can't tell you how many rooms I walked into and didn't even make it to the chair, I turned right around and walked out b/c for me it doesn't pay - I would never play solo piano, horn, vocals, etc. I can't wrap my head around the fact that someone would demo music that only covers 1/4 of the frequency spectrum, how is that showing you what the speakers can do?  If that's the case just get a Diamond coated, Beryllium infused, Unobtanium Dome Tweeter and throw it in a 72 coat Piano Black Lacquered box and you should be good to go!

     

    I know people have the money to spend on this high end hobby otherwise it wouldn't exist.  But for my hard earned money I want to spend money on a system to see what it can do with the music I actually listen to.  I see the value on playing some high res demo files to accentuate certain parts of a system, but all I ask is to vary the music played to actually show what a system can do with all types (varieties) of music.

     

    Ok, I done now!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Tom

     

    "You honestly think I don't realize that most people earn their money? I have zero bitterness toward anyone in any tax bracket. 

     

    Plus, you have no clue about my financial situation. "

     

    Dude, there you go again, of course I realize that, I was just calling it the way I read it. Isn't the comment section for feedback? 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Great reporting.   I am done with shows and you just told me why! 

    In re pricing:  I think most of the super high end equipment is sold outside the US.  (opinion only)   

     

    Example 1.  China is Porsche largest market.

    Example 2.  My Persian rug dealer has regaled me with tales of Russian kleptocrats asking for the most expensive rug in the shop with no concern for the design, provenance, size or history of the piece.....

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Agree with your overall reaction and position. I rarely find that shows offer more than a passable music experience. When they do it's almost always with live music, and lively attendees, and even manufacturers reps, such as Peter McGrath of Wilson. When the manufacturer or dealer puts the music first, that's when I get engaged. Our analogue brethren typically breath that air, while many in the computer space aren't always coming from that space.  Fact is, the public thinks about music reproduction in the home, in a variety of diverse ways. I always tell people I know to avoid shows if they think they'll find a suitable system. I steer them to their local dealers where they are more likely to find a better environment for both getting a good listening experience and options that fit their home and budget. By the by, do you plan on reviewing any dCS gear?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, steve21 said:

    Tom

     

    "You honestly think I don't realize that most people earn their money? I have zero bitterness toward anyone in any tax bracket. 

     

    Plus, you have no clue about my financial situation. "

     

    Dude, there you go again, of course I realize that, I was just calling it the way I read it. Isn't the comment section for feedback? 

     

    Please help me understand. 

     

    You were joking in the first comment? Because you said "of course I realize that" I can only assume you said it as a joke or for some other reason of which I'm unaware. 

     

    Then you suggest you're calling it the way you see it. Huh? 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    12 minutes ago, stevebythebay said:

    Agree with your overall reaction and position. I rarely find that shows offer more than a passable music experience. When they do it's almost always with live music, and lively attendees, and even manufacturers reps, such as Peter McGrath of Wilson. When the manufacturer or dealer puts the music first, that's when I get engaged. Our analogue brethren typically breath that air, while many in the computer space aren't always coming from that space.  Fact is, the public thinks about music reproduction in the home, in a variety of diverse ways. I always tell people I know to avoid shows if they think they'll find a suitable system. I steer them to their local dealers where they are more likely to find a better environment for both getting a good listening experience and options that fit their home and budget. By the by, do you plan on reviewing any dCS gear?

     

    Yes, I have a Rossini in my system right now. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Chris, while there is a thread about 'superclocks' elsewhere, do you have the Ros Clock with you? I vaguely recall from your Paganini review that you weren't overwhelmed by the addition of the master clock, so I'm curious if your impressions differ this time.

    My previous dCS dealer is no longer around, so it's hard for me to ever contemplate an upgrade to a Ros DAC by demonstration. 

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    49 minutes ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

     

    Yes, I have a Rossini in my system right now. 

    What about the Network Bridge?  And will you be reviewing either/both in the future?  I'm particularly interested in your thoughts on using the Network Bridge in lieu of the Berkeley Alpha USB with the Ref 2 DAC.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Great post.

     

    I was just telling my wife how it is so difficult to find like-minded people, that really enjoy music. Even among local hi fi groups, at meetups, you tend to hear people recycling pet recordings that have mediocre musical value but pristine sonics. Even worse is when people exhibit snobbery over music that they haven't even heard, because it is not on an audiophile-approved list, or it is from an unknown recording studio, engineer, or label.

     

    Worst of all in my book is when people don't see live music to gain a better understanding of how real instruments and voices sound outside of the rarefied listening room. Live music, more than helping to calibrate how your system should sound, reminds you how music communicates. So you get to understand how throat singing or any other example of unfamiliar music is more than just the sound being reproduced in front of you, you can understand the why as well.

     

    Very little data to support this, but the more money is available in a group or community, the less musical appreciation actually drives decision making.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    "People in the industry should ask themselves if they are having fun at these audio shows. The chances are high that the answer would be no. If they aren't having fun, how do they expect potential customers to have fun?"
     
    This quote from the article really stands out to me.  This is a hobby and hobbies should be fun for all involved.  Indeed we can derive our fun in different ways from various things as audiophiles - you could be into SET amps/high efficiency speakers/classical/DIY, but it should be fun.  Fact is that manufacturers pay a LOT of money to come and support these events and if they are doing the same thing year after year, playing the same music, you are simply doing it wrong.  Showcasing new gear, customer exposure to manufactures, learning about new tech, and music discovery should be at the center of reasons audio shows should attract people.  We should be expanding the hobby and appreciation of a quality listening experience to everybody that likes music, not just to audiophiles in our own echo chamber.  If we can reach more people that enjoy music, then you can attract new people to appreciate music as they have not before.  Think of the people who are on the every two year revolving door or buying the newest tech in a TV.  If consumers can understand and appreciate high quality video, then surely they would appreciate a quality lossless audio experience if they were just exposed to it.  Also, misinformation and arguments on questions nobody asked should not be a thing at a paid event.
     
    This is an editorial that every exhibitor, show sponsor, and audiophile should take to heart.  I really appreciate you taking a risk Chris and breaking character to start the discussion.  Your candor and style on topics like this are exactly what make CA different than other resources.  I imagine that months of planning and executing a forum transition eating into your music time set the tone for your perspective (no harm no foul on that….).  One thing that I think would be cool coming out of this would be for rooms to sponsor people within the industry to come in at pre set times and “play a set” as you did in the Quintessence room.  It’s about the music, right?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I won't beat a dead horse, but perhaps people are taking my statement in other ways I didn't intend. The statement is about why people are into this hobby, not how they pay for the hobby. People paying for gear with their own hard earned money fall into the first two categories of in it for the music and/or in it for the gear.

     

    Anyway, @steve21 sent me a PM to follow up on his comments. All is well. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Well said Chris, thank you!

     

    I find it very rare in this industry to find store/salesmen etc that still care about music and the enjoyment of it. And if I'm not mistaken that's the whole point, if it wasn't for the music there'd be no industry at all. 

     

    Keep up reporting it like you see it!

     

    Andy

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Well thought out article, Chris, and many valid points made. The gathering at the bar was a highlight for me too, and, as Ted noted, a reminder of how much we love music and why were are in the audio game in the first place. It was great to meet you and Ted and everyone, and the continuing discussion many of us had over food and beer (big thanks to the Concierge for the coupons) was an additional bonus.

     

    Ted, I also greatly enjoyed Klaus of Odyssey's Blacklight/Tiki Bar room, and his complete system for $6995.00 including the Khartago monoblocks, his new preamp, the amazing Kismet speakers (which he hates to make) and all cabling was one of the miraculous bargains of the show. 

     

    Did anyone else hear the incredible horn speakers on the 6th floor next to the Lampizator room? Fred (an old Head-Fi buddy) the US Lampizator rep told me to make sure I stopped at the unknown Polish audio company's (Destination Audio) room next door, and I can't thank him enough. Those immense horns that were being powered superbly with only 1.5 watts per channel were simply breathtaking in their sound and otherworldly in their soundstage. I first walked into a live recording of Johnny Cash and thought I was on the stage with him. It takes the gentleman who owns the company and his five man team literally six months to build a single pair of these magnificent speakers. I made no less than three trips back to that room just to listen to various musical selections played back through the horns and sat in near disbelief at the sound that came out of them.  The richness of the sound, the depth, and immense air of the notes as they surrounded you were simply breathtaking. If it possible for anything to be said to be a bargain at $95,000.00 a pair. I am currently looking into selling body parts I can get along without to fund a pair of these but sadly, realize I will never have the means. 

     

    Here is some commentary from Stereophile's coverage of the show about these magical speakers:

     

    http://www.stereophile.com/content/janas-day-3-axpona#D0adgTvs6BzpPXTB.97

     

    JC

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I do like the editorial. The industry works for us not the reverse. It is Sunday afternoon, I preparing the slides for a symposium in Florence next October while listening to a Fagiolini HiRes file of Monteverdi's The Other Vespers on Devialet Pro 440 monos fed by a dedicated MacBook Pro running Roon connected to a pair of Wilson Duette. This is what music is for me, my audio equipment is just a way to make me connect best to the music I love. Background music? Yes, I am a busy academic surgeon and I rarely have time to listen with nothing else to write or read. It is neither right or wrong, it is just my way!

    Nice work Chris, keep going!

    Andrea

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    On 4/29/2017 at 8:45 AM, The Computer Audiophile said:

     

    Dare I say you're part of the problem. 

    I love what you do on this site.

     

    But as a professional musician (not as a rawk guitar operator), I'd like to feel that I've earned a point of view.

     

    The "solution" may not rest in 40-50 year old rawk offerings, remastered for the umpteeth time.  

     

    But to each his own.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    33 minutes ago, boatheelmusic said:

    I love what you do on this site.

     

    But as a professional musician (not as a rawk guitar operator), I'd like to feel that I've earned a point of view.

     

    The "solution" may not rest in 40-50 year old rawk offerings, remastered for the umpteeth time.  

     

    But to each his own.

     

    Nobody needs to earn a point of view here. All are welcomed. 

     

    I just have an issue with you suggesting a HiFi system and certain music don't mix. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Why do they play Barbies and Krells and Bubbles at shows?

    Because they sound "spectacular" and make their gear "look" good.

     

    There was a time in my life when I lived off the words of the hi-fi critics, drooled over the photos of high-end gear in glossy magazines, my heart pounding in excited expectation as I picked up the latest issue, and I  listened repeatedly to that audiophile-approved garbage looking for the imagined effects of some ridiculous tweak; and I think that I wasn't the only zombie who fell into that bad spell...

    Fortunately I have grown out of it.

     

    R

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now

  • Superphonica
×