• The Front Page RSS Feed

    by Published on 01-24-2009 02:14 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Music

    Some Computer Audiophile readers have been familiar with Kent Poon of Design w Sound for quite a while. To be honest I had heard of him and had browsed his website here and there, but I didn't really understand what he did or what his site was all about. If I had done a little research at the time I would have realized Kent Poon is a is a highly esteemed producer and mastering engineer. Kent is at the top of the industry in Asia and has a very impressive resume. In fact he is one of the youngest full members of the Audio Engineering Society (AES). I met Kent this year at CES and I've been extremely impressed with him and his work ever since. I am very pleased to introduce the rest of the Computer Audiophile readers to Kent Poon and his latest piece of work Audiophile Jazz Prologue III. ...
    by Published on 01-19-2009 02:07 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. 2009 Consumer Electronics Show

    Old school analog and new school digital were definitely coexisting and thriving at CES 2009. This was never more evident than in the TAD suit where high resolution music was playing back from a music server and a tape machine. There were also suites dedicated to each playback method. For example Winston Ma's hospitality suite featured a MacBook Pro with Amarra and Sonic Studio's FireWire hardware. On the opposite end of the spectrum was the J-Corder suite that featured nothing but custom reel-to-reel tape machines. Both methods of playback were equally as impressive and enjoyable in their own right. ...
    by Published on 01-16-2009 11:06 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. 2009 Consumer Electronics Show

    The TAD suite at CES this year produced some of the best sound of the entire show. OK, I must admit to being a little bias because I did build the music server TAD used for the entire show. Fortunately everyone who sat through a demonstration from TAD's Andrew Jones was very pleased with the sound as well. Thus you can be sure I'm not exaggerating just because I was involved in a tiny piece of the sound quality. Much of the build information about this exact server can be found in my previous article titled Absolutely Silent Audiophile Music Server. The hardware is pretty close to what Robert Harley used for his music server article in the January issue of The Abso!ute Sound. In addition to fine tuning the OS I configured Windows XP to operate using only three services and 57MB of RAM at startup. Scaling back a Windows operating system is never a bad thing in my opinion. ...
    by Published on 01-14-2009 02:06 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. 2009 Consumer Electronics Show

    At CES this year Ayre Acoustics unveiled its USB DAC. In typical Ayre fashion this component has very nice build quality with a minimalist appearance. The most impressive things about the Ayre USB DAC are 1. It supports 16/44.1, 24/88.2, and 24/96 native sample rates, and 2. This DAC use the asynchronous USB protocol. Think of the Ayre USB DAC as the solid state version of Gordon Rankin's Wavelength Audio DACs. Ayre Acoustics partnered with Gordon to develop this new USB DAC and licensed his asynchronous USB implementation. This Ayre DAC is built solely for USB computer integration. There are no other interfaces available. This allowed Ayre to concentrate all its efforts on one interface without compromises. The DAC is also fully compatible with the AyreLink communication system through RJ-11 ports on the rear of the chassis. I spent some time listening to the new Ayre USB DAC and was pretty impressed even under less than ideal show conditions. I'm looking forward to reviewing this DAC as soon as it's officially released in a few months. Read more for images of the Ayre Acoustics CES suite. ...
    by Published on 01-13-2009 09:22 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. 2009 Consumer Electronics Show

    CES 2009 has been over for a couple days now and I've had some time to digest everything I saw in Vegas this year. Computer based playback has finally overcome many of the traditional high-end audio hurdles. Even the old school audiophiles used music servers in their suites at the Venetian. The manufacturers without music servers usually had a new CD player to showcase and didn't want to send mixed signals by using a computer based source. USB was the most popular interface but there was no shortage of S/PDIF, AES, FireWire, and even Ethernet. Many operating systems were in use including Windows XP, Windows Vista, OS X, and different versions of Linux. Plus, there was an important presence by Sonic Studio's Amarra software / hardware package...

    ...
    by Published on 01-07-2009 01:07 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. 2009 Consumer Electronics Show

    The 2009 Consumer Electronics Show is here! Check Computer Audiophile frequently for the latest information about computer based playback and music servers. There will be some great product announcements over the next few days and Computer Audiophile will have photos and videos of everything. All the CA readers in Vegas are encouraged to share their experiences here on the site.
    ...

  •