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    by Published on 02-28-2009 11:37 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. iTunes,
    3. Software,
    4. Basics

    Sharing a single iTunes Library among several users is not difficult to setup if you know what you're doing. If you're a newbie it can be an exercise in frustration when error messages about read only directories pop up. The term Sharing in the context of this article does not equate to the built-in iTunes library sharing feature. Rather, sharing in this situation means using a single iTunes library and music folder location for several different users of the same computer. (Note: This will also work for several users on different computers if the appropriate files are placed on a network drive visible by all computers.) After setting up the shared library all users should be able to sync their individual iPods with their own personalized settings as well. Here is a video showing how to setup a single iTunes Library for use by several users, followed by some basic instructions that go along with the video. ...
    by Published on 02-27-2009 10:28 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. iTunes,
    3. Basics

    Moving an iTunes library is one of the simplest tasks around. Yet, many people are hesitant to move their library for fear of losing all their music. Plus, many people who have attempted to move their library have run into problems and error messages that appear to indicate their music has disappeared. Frequently these problems lead to frantic forum posts where readers plead for help like their dealing with a life and death situation. I think most of us have been there at one time or another. Even if for a split second, the thought of accidentally deleting your whole library is terrifying. Sure much of the music is replaceable but the time spent to rip a couple terabytes worth of music is gone for good. Fortunately Apple has made the process of moving an iTunes library very simple. In fact it's so simple that many people quickly look over-think the process and assume they need to recreate the wheel to accomplish the task. There are a few more ways to move a library that are not covered here. I've selected the easiest method of moving from point A to point B for this article. What follows is a short Computer Audiophile Academy how-to video and the official Apple documentation about moving an iTunes library. ...
    by Published on 02-18-2009 09:38 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Software,
    3. Bits & Bytes

    Computer Audiophile readers using Mac OS X are very familiar with the sample rate ritual required to play high resolution material through iTunes. In the near future Sonic Studio's Amarra hardware/software package will render this ritual obsolete. Amarra has built-in auto sample rate recognition, in addition to many other great features, that enables listeners to switch between sample rates without touching Audio Midi Setup or closing iTunes. The output from Amarra remains bit perfect at every sample rate up to 24/192. However, Amarra is still being refined before its official release date fairly soon. Plus, the current global economy has most people exercising restraint before shelling out money for items that don't keep the heat on or keep the roof over their head. In the spirit of saving money and increasing convenience I now present CA-SampleRate my semi-automatic sample rate solution. Did I mention it's free? (As in beer)

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    by Published on 02-15-2009 08:18 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Music Servers

    Audiophiles using Microsoft operating systems have many options when it comes to customized music servers. Everything from micro sized low power music servers to ultra powerful space shuttle-like music servers (think noisy) can be purchased from numerous online dealers. However, the much preferred silent and solid state music servers are few and far between. One company filling this void is End PC Noise. In collaboration with Goodwin's High-End, one of the most respected names in high-end audio, End PC Noise is offering music servers built specifically for audiophiles. I've been using the mCubed hFX Music Server built by End PC Noise since I arrived home from CES and I continue to be very satisfied with the audiophile-esque build quality and 100% silent operation. ...
    by Published on 02-11-2009 10:20 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. 2009 Consumer Electronics Show

    According to Wikipedia, "In film and video, footage is the raw, unedited material as it had been originally recorded by video camera, which usually must be edited to create a motion picture, video clip, television show or similar completed work." The follow four videos are definitely in the footage category, but the word lost might be a bit of a stretch. It sure makes the title sound more important though. This footage has been sitting on my MacBook Air since the 2009 Consumer Electronics Show back in early January. As usual other topics have jumped the queue and made the front page of Computer Audiophile before I had a chance to publish these videos. Since this stuff is raw and unedited I hope it at least gives the readers/viewers a feel for what the show is like if nothing else. Some of the footage is blurry, but video of the Manley suite is always good considering the very cool vibe that perpetuates in there year after year. Other footage includes Kimber Cable, Boulder, PS Audio, dCS, and Red Wine Audio. Enjoy. ...
    by Published on 02-10-2009 09:14 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. iTunes,
    3. Software,
    4. Basics

    Creating playlists is one thing I avoided for the longest time. I could never think of a reason why I'd want a playlist. My listening habits were so haphazard that I rarely knew what I wanted to hear until I clicked the mouse on an album. That was pre-high resolution audio. Now I have a separate playlist for every sample rate in my collection. I use iTunes Smart Playlists because manual upkeep is not my thing. iTunes smart playlists dynamically stay up to date based on the rules you create. The following video shows how to create smart playlists for all sample rates between 16/44.1 kHz and 24/352.8 kHz. Using sample rates to define smart playlists is one of many very cool ways to sort a music collection. Watch the video, create your own personalized smart playlists, and share with the rest of us what you've done. ...

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