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    by Published on 07-18-2016 11:34 AM
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    2. The Music In Me
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    I don’t remember where or how I heard it. It might have been in a magazine or it might have been on the street. I don’t think I dreamed it, and when I think about it, it still makes sense. My memory these days isn’t what it was, and there’s lots of things I forget, but a) my long-term memory is fine, and b) there are things I forget, but what I remember, I remember, which is taking too long to tell you that back in the late 1960’s I heard or read that there were four bands in America, two on the east coast, and two in the west coast, that other musicians studied for their musicianship. On the east coast they were Steely Dan and The Band, and on the west coast they were Little Feat and The Sons of Champlin. Who? The Sons of Champlin. So here’s a bit of Bay Area musical history you might not be familiar with. ...
    by Published on 07-12-2016 03:00 PM
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    I stumbled on a site named Polygraph a few months ago. Polygraph actually operates completely opposite from the way CA operates. I usually elect to use prose over graphics and photos, while Polygraph tells stories with data and code to produce fabulous visuals. Polygraph describes itself as, "a publication that incites water cooler discussion about complex topics. We avoid long-winded essays at all costs, using code, visuals, and animation to construct a different sort of story, one that's often reader-driven, embeddable, and open-source." What makes Polygraph so interesting to me and the CA Community is the use of technology to tell us something about our favorite music.

    A few of the topics covered by Polygraph include:
    The Evolution of Music Taste
    Wikipedia Pages On Which Miles Davis Is Mentioned
    Using Spotify To Measure The Popularity Of Older Music
    When Music Becomes Popular, Faster
    This Is What Hip Hop Sounded Like In 1995
    Using Playlists To Crowdsource The Definition Of Punk
    Hip Hop Labels Sorted By The Success Of Their Artists On Billboard
    Rappers Sorted By The Size Of Their Vocabulary ...
    by Published on 07-06-2016 02:59 PM
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    Last week the McIntosh Group hosted its first ever convention in Sardinia, Italy. The Group consists of six brands including McIntosh, Audio Research, Sonus Faber, Wadia, Pryma, and Sumiko. Thus, there was quite a bit of audio being discussed at the event, from analog to digital to all-in-one speaker systems to large flagship loudspeakers. It was a great opportunity to dig deep into the product lines, talk to product designers, and get a glimpse into the future of each brand. For some brands like Sonus Faber the future is now, with the introduction of the Sf16, while other brands like Wadia are undergoing a makeover for an upcoming transformation. Here are my highlights of the McIntosh Group convention 2016. ...
    by Published on 06-29-2016 08:59 AM
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    Hello Everyone, I'm currently out of town at an audio event in Italy, but still want to let the CA Community know about a new podcast in which I participated in a show about high resolution audio. The podcast is called The Next Track, and it's hosted by Kirk McElhern and Doug Adams. Mac users will likely be familiar with both of these guys. Kirk is a Senior Contributor to Macworld, where he writes the Ask the iTunes Guy column. He has also written more than twenty books. Kirk has been kind enough to mention CA in both print and digital editions of Macworld and on his site Kirkville. Doug Adams is the guy behind Doug's Scripts, a site dedicated to AppleScripts since 2001. If you're an iTunes user on CA and haven't used at least one of Doug's scripts, I'd be very surprised. Doug is also a media / voice-over producer.

    The Next Track is billed as, "a podcast about how people listen to music today... We discuss music and how it’s consumed, whether it be analog or digital, downloaded or streamed, audio or video. We also look at some of the hardware we use to listen to music: speakers, headphones, portable players, and home audio equipment." ...
    by Published on 06-16-2016 08:40 PM
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    2. The Music In Me
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    WARNING: This essay contains prrofanity. Definitely NSFW! And then more NSFW at the end!

    In 1969, the Rolling Stones were once again behind the Beatles. The Stones’ manager made them write their own songs because the Beatles were writing their own songs, but the Beatles were always a few months ahead. The Beatles went out-there-psychedelic with Sgt. Pepper’s six months before the Stones went out-there-psychedelic with Their Satanic Majesty’s Request. Then the Beatles went acoustic and diverse with the White Album, and the Stones followed them with Beggar’s Banquet. In 1968, the Beatles left their onerous contract with Capitol Records and started their own label, calling it Apple Music, which was also planned to encompass clothing, inventions, and other bands and projects of an as-yet ill-defined nature. It was an exciting time in Beatleville, what with them driving cool cars and buying estates in the country to live in while the Stones were angry and tired of being perennially so broke that they had to ask for money to pay rent on the boring London flats they were still living in. The Beatles were rich and they weren’t. By now they knew that the only way to make any money was to do what the Beatles had done, so they decided to leave their label, London (Decca), and start their own label, which they’d call Rolling Stones Records. ...
    by Published on 05-22-2016 06:21 PM
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    2. The Music In Me
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    There was a brief time in America between the beatniks and the hippies, and that was the time of the folkies. The Sixties was a time of cultural change, and among the precursors of the change was the new interest in folk music. Actually, to say that the interest in folk music was new would be disingenuous; what we now call folk music used to be known as… music. It chronicled the thoughts of the day, and some of those songs are still around, although their meanings have generally fallen into don’t-know-don’t-careville. Por ejemplo, it’s commonly understood that song we all sang, “Roses, roses, pocket full of posies, all fall down,” was about dying from the Black Plague in London in 1665. As recently as the 1920’s and ‘30’s, we had the folk music that came out of the deep South and the Okie Dust Bowl migration of the 30’s, and some of that turned into jazz, blues and rock. Before the new jongleurs* like Bob Dylan showed up in the early Sixties, folk music was mostly songs from the past, although the irony must have been noted that at one time, those songs had been written, they’d been topical. Sure, songs about romances sweet and tragic were always topical, but we’ve been singing about the erosion of London Bridge since at least the Sixteenth Century. Still do, yo. ...

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