• CA Articles RSS Feed

    by Published on 09-20-2016 10:20 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. The Music In Me
    Article Preview



    Songs get written, songs get recorded, songs get heard, songs get rerecorded and then heard again. Okay, so no one learned anything new from that, but youíll enjoy some of the songs weíre covering today. Covering! Ha! That was mighty clever, as youíll soon agree.


    When someone records a song, thatís a recording. But when someone else hears that recording and then plays it or records it, thatís a cover. Sometimes a cover recording is more famous than the original, and some of the songs you like might be covers and you might like the original better than the version you know. Weíre going to visit three covers and you can decide which you like better. Itís not a contest, there are no prizes, itís all for fun. There are scads of covers, and you could suggest your own, but we only have time for three, so with no reference whatsoever as to why I chose these three, here they are. Regular readers will know that I love the Stones, so letís go there: ...
    by Published on 08-25-2016 07:31 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. The Music In Me
    Article Preview



    Editor's Note: I've written and re-written several introductions to this article over the past 30 minutes, but none of them do this article justice. An introduction isn't necessary, but I believe it's important, to get the point across that this article contains difficult subject matter and how those in the artistic community dealt with a terrible part of our history in the US. If this article doesn't make you feel for the people involved, doesn't make you want to listen to the "song of the century," doesn't make you want to listen to more of the great music of the time, then I can't relate to you. I thank Gilbert for writing about this song, the surrounding circumstances, and including insightful information. If you're familiar with song and the situation, this remains an interesting read and should spark you to do some listening this evening. - CC


    In 1999, as the Twentieth Century was winding down, Time magazine sent its editors and correspondents out on an epic assignment: define, analyze and curate the Twentieth Century. It was to be the story of the century (no pun intended). Time wanted to present whatever had happened, what preceded it, what succeeded it, and what it meant. All categories were to be considered and evaluated, and as this column is about music, weíll look at how they rated the music of that volatile, passing century.

    They considered beauty and impact, and out of every piece of music written and recorded in the past hundred years, their selection as the most significant song of the century was ďStrange Fruit,Ē by Billie Holiday. While I know there are excellent reasons for their selection, I asked several friends what they knew about the song, and thatís why I feel that not enough people know it. And, as you would surmise, the song has quite a story behind it. So it is both historic and it has a history. Letís look and listen: ...
    by Published on 08-11-2016 03:42 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Bits & Bytes
    Article Preview



    In the summer of 1991 Pearl Jam's album Ten was released and it changed my life. Since then, Pearl Jam has been my favorite band. I've seen them play around the country many times. Each Pearl Jam show features a new setlist created by singer Eddie Vedder on the day of the show. To more experienced concert goers, who attended shows in the 1960s and 1970s, this type of setlist is nothing new. But, for younger music aficionados like myself, a new setlist at every concert is something special. My first concert was a Motley Crue show at the long gone Met Center here in Minnesota on March 06, 1990 (here's my ticket stub). Motley Crue played virtually the same 17 songs two nights earlier in Omaha as they did in Minnesota and three nights later in Madison, Wisconsin. Over the years I've seen more band's with fixed setlist than I've seen those who mix it up on a nightly basis. Anyway, when Pearl Jam announced it would be playing Boston's Fenway Park this summer, I immediately logged into my Pearl Jam fan club account and entered the drawing to purchase tickets. Weeks later I was notified that my name had been drawn for two tickets to the August 05, 2016 show. Flights were booked, hotel reservations were made, and as Pearl Jam sang in the song Corduroy, the waiting drove me mad. ...
    by Published on 07-28-2016 12:49 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Bits & Bytes
    Article Preview



    While the prices of many HiFi goods continue to go up, the prices of high tech goods continue to go down. In addition to prices going down, high tech goods almost always increase performance and features while decreasing in size for this reduced price. I wish the HiFi world was like the high tech world in this respect, but I completely understand the nature of building something by hand at the highest quality in low quantity versus building something for the lowest price at incredibly high volume in parts of the world where labor is extremely inexpensive. That may be a discussion for a different day because today is about the convergence of HiFi and high tech.

    I've always recommended that people start by purchasing the least expensive products and move up the ladder until they are satisfied. It simply makes sense. Some people know they will only be satisfied with the best and possibly most expensive options while others feel rewarded by finding a the best value. Neither way is right, it's all about choice.

    Before we get started with this cool new product, I want to address a misconception that some people have with CA covering items like a $7.99 audio endpoint. I've been told by some manufacturers that I shouldn't write about this stuff, it's too DIY and DIY'ers don't spend money, and that it isn't HiFi enough and that they don't like the direction of CA. I believe that type of small-minded thinking is what old-school HiFi is all about and it's something that old-school HiFi must get over if it wants to succeed in the future. CA isn't a DIY site, but we feature cool products when we seen them. Plus, these articles do wonders for bringing in a new audience to the CA community and HiFi in general. CA has a huge contingent of readers in Silicon Valley (and Australia, G'day mates) who love music, are a bit geeky, have technical aptitude, have disposable income, and would likely never have heard of most of our favorite HiFi brands without content like this that bridges the gap. Furthermore, when people purchase $7.99 audio endpoints, they need DACs to make music. Purchase five of these inexpensive endpoints for different rooms, and one will need five DACs. The money saved on endpoints can also be spent on other items such as software, music, amps, cables, loudspeakers, etc... I could go on, but I don't want to derail an otherwise cool product introduction with my rant about why products like this are good for HiFi. Either one believes it or not. The world is changing. ...
    by Published on 07-18-2016 11:34 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. The Music In Me
    Article Preview



    I donít remember where or how I heard it. It might have been in a magazine or it might have been on the street. I donít think I dreamed it, and when I think about it, it still makes sense. My memory these days isnít what it was, and thereís lots of things I forget, but a) my long-term memory is fine, and b) there are things I forget, but what I remember, I remember, which is taking too long to tell you that back in the late 1960ís I heard or read that there were four bands in America, two on the east coast, and two in the west coast, that other musicians studied for their musicianship. On the east coast they were Steely Dan and The Band, and on the west coast they were Little Feat and The Sons of Champlin. Who? The Sons of Champlin. So hereís a bit of Bay Area musical history you might not be familiar with. ...
    by Published on 07-12-2016 03:00 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Bits & Bytes
    Article Preview



    I stumbled on a site named Polygraph a few months ago. Polygraph actually operates completely opposite from the way CA operates. I usually elect to use prose over graphics and photos, while Polygraph tells stories with data and code to produce fabulous visuals. Polygraph describes itself as, "a publication that incites water cooler discussion about complex topics. We avoid long-winded essays at all costs, using code, visuals, and animation to construct a different sort of story, one that's often reader-driven, embeddable, and open-source." What makes Polygraph so interesting to me and the CA Community is the use of technology to tell us something about our favorite music.

    A few of the topics covered by Polygraph include:
    The Evolution of Music Taste
    Wikipedia Pages On Which Miles Davis Is Mentioned
    Using Spotify To Measure The Popularity Of Older Music
    When Music Becomes Popular, Faster
    This Is What Hip Hop Sounded Like In 1995
    Using Playlists To Crowdsource The Definition Of Punk
    Hip Hop Labels Sorted By The Success Of Their Artists On Billboard
    Rappers Sorted By The Size Of Their Vocabulary ...

    Page 1 of 48 1234511 ... LastLast