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  1. #1
    Sophomore Member Booster MPS's Avatar
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    Disaster Recovery Plan for Data Storage

    I have heard (and responded to) the warnings of several members regarding backing up our data. I thought I would ask the next level question of how members back up data off site in the unfortunate event or loss of data in a home. I was thinking this weekend as I was wrapping up ripping my CDís what would I do if not only the data was lost on my redundant drives but also the original physical media in the event of something really bad happening.

    Are there members who have addressed backing up data to an off site location? How did you do it? I could not imagine that something like DropBox would be a reasonable solution give the volume of data that we collect on drives.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Just keep your backup hard drive in your friend's house. No need to make it complicated

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by phofman View Post
    Just keep your backup hard drive in your friend's house. No need to make it complicated
    Yup. I keep a backup drive at my office with the most valuable stuff on it. At this stage, every site I DL from except HD tracks allows multiple DL's anyways, so only the HD Tracks stuff and stuff I kinda didn't pay for needs triple backup.

  4. #4
    I have a 3-TB external drive connected to my computer at home. It contains my entire music library, which is about 2.5-TB big.

    Almost every day I am adding new music or updating tags. Every evening before I turn off my computer, I sync my music library with a backup copy I keep on two 2-TB portable hard drives which I keep with me. I use the Windows program FreeFileSync for this purpose. I had to split my main music library into two smaller sub-libraries and keep each sub-library on a different portable drive.

    I also have a 3-TB external drive attached to my computer at work. Each morning I sync my portable drives with my work drive, making my work drive a mirror of my home drive.

    So I have three copies of my music library, which I started to work on back in 2004. My main copy at home, a mirror image copy at work, and a copy that I keep with me "just in case".
    Last edited by pescholl; 03-19-2013 at 09:56 AM. Reason: fix typos

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by pescholl View Post
    I have a 3-TB external drive connected to my computer at home. It contains my entire music library, which is about 2.5-TB big.

    Almost every day I am adding new music or updating tags. Every evening before I turn off my computer, I sync my music library with a backup copy I keep on two 2-TB portable hard drives which I keep with me. I use the Windows program FreeFileSync for this purpose. I had to split my main music library into two smaller sub-libraries and keep each sub-library on a different portable drive.

    I also have a 3-TB external drive attached to my computer at work. Each morning I sync my portable drives with my work drive, making my work drive a mirror of my home drive.

    So I have three copies of my music library, which I started to work on back in 2004. My main copy at home, a mirror image copy at work, and a copy that I keep with me "just in case".
    Very wise. I am very similar.

    I have a three TB LaCie and a 4TB Lacie hooked to my music laptop and I consider them my "masters" which are backed up at that site by a 3TB WD Green in a Eagle enclosure.

    My downloads come in through the laptop in my home office, and this is connected to a WD 4TB and a pair of Seagate 3TB drives. The WD is my primary backup for files as they come in. One of the secondary Seagates is devoted to office and non-music backups, the other backsup hi-res rips, DSD material. ISO files I keep on a drive in the closet.

    Purely for entertainment I have a 3TB Convr Mohawk that is cool, and provides one last level of backup.

    So unless I have a real disaster, I am secure.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Hutton View Post
    At this stage, every site I DL from except HD tracks allows multiple DL's anyways, so only the HD Tracks stuff and stuff I kinda didn't pay for needs triple backup.
    Sites that exist today may not tomorrow: I would suggest triple backups for the entire music collection.

  7. #7
    Ideally I would like to have optical backups of my music collection to protect it against a nuclear EMP, but with (affordable single-layer) BluRay storage limited to 25Gb per disc, this is not practical at all. Are you aware of hard drive enclosures that are sufficiently shielded to protect the drive from a nuclear EMP?

    Perhaps I am going too far: if things go so badly in the world that a hydrogen bomb gets detonated in the stratosphere, maybe I will have other things to worry about than my music collection...

  8. #8
    I am planning to do an optical backup of my music collection on Blu-Ray in the near future. I figure 50 BDs per TB of data. So my entire music collection would fit on 150 BD-Rs. That is entirely manageable.

    Purchase one of those "DJ" cases with the hanging CD sleeves. Toss the sleeves and replace them with double slimline jewel cases. Store the BD-Rs in the slimline cases and the cases in the DJ box. Be sure to use archival grade BD-Rs such as TDK, Falcon or M-Disc.

    Put the DJ case in a lead-lined, underground vault that can withstand a direct nuclear explosion...

  9. #9
    The main reason I'm planning on doing an optical backup of my music library is the threat of a virus. If a virus were to get past my home defenses and start messing up the headers in my music library, and I sync my drives without realizing what happened, I could loose all my music and nine years of work.

    With that in mind, a non-volatile optical archive of my music library (and other data libraries) becomes high-priority.

  10. #10
    I have only 800Gb of music files, so after all I "only" need to burn 20 Blu-ray discs. But still, I am dispirited by the prospect of spending so many hours burning BD-Rs...

  11. #11
    Freshman Member bogdan101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris75 View Post
    Ideally I would like to have optical backups of my music collection to protect it against a nuclear EMP, but with (affordable single-layer) BluRay storage limited to 25Gb per disc, this is not practical at all. Are you aware of hard drive enclosures that are sufficiently shielded to protect the drive from a nuclear EMP?

    Perhaps I am going too far: if things go so badly in the world that a hydrogen bomb gets detonated in the stratosphere, maybe I will have other things to worry about than my music collection...
    At least the surviving cockroaches will be grateful to you for safeguarding for them your music collection.

  12. #12

    Disaster Recovery Plan for Data Storage

    I also have 3 copies, permanent Time machine backup of the entire system at home and all drives in CarbonCopyCloner backups at work that I synchronize about 1x month

    On the blue ray approaches, experts will tell you that all physicals dis eventually will have problems, including discs.
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  13. #13
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    This is hilarious, I was just thinking about this and was going to start a thread. Lo and behold, it's the top thread in this section right now!

    I want to also hear what others are doing!

    Locally, I have a 12TB RAID 5 Array (~10TB usable: 6 2TB Drives) driven by an Adaptec 51245 Controller in my Windows 2008 R2 Server, which holds all my stuff, not limited to just music. All music is accessed over the network via SMB shares to my Sonos or Thinkpad which I use as my audio server, running JRiver 18.

    For on-site backup, I have an 8TB drive (2 4TB drives in a RAID 0 enclosure) which I back up to about monthly using Acronis Backup & Restore. It sits in a fire safe when not in use. RAID 0 is admittedly terrible for a backup, but it's better than nothing!

    In the next year, I plan on getting a QNAP or Synology NAS OR an Intel NUC or something with external RAID drive. I'll put 4+ 4TB drives in this, do an initial backup to it, then put it at my Dad's house in the Midwest (I'm on East Coast) on an UPS and do incremental backups to it over the Internet with a backup software package I have yet to determine. Looks like if I use Synology, I'll have to use some kind of rsync client. If it's a full on Windows machine, I'll have more freedom, but then it will be one more computer to manage, ugh.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Musicophile View Post
    On the blue ray approaches, experts will tell you that all physicals dis eventually will have problems, including discs.
    True. I'm in my mid-50s and have a couple chronic medical problems, I hope to have another 20 years left in me. I just want my music collection to last longer than I do and then passed down to my kids. My oldest daughter will treat it like a family heirloom, knowing how much of my life I've poured into it.

    Concerning optical media, I am a firm believer in non-volatile backups of my data. Heck, I'm almost OCD about it! For the consumer, that means optical discs.

    When my brother was working on his masters thesis, a hard drive failure delayed him getting his degree by a year. I've lost personal data due to hard drive crashes, computer failures, and viruses. Corrupted data gets backed up as easily and good data. The only data truly "safe" from corruption is stored on non-volatile media.

    A good rule-of-thumb is: Have three copies of your data on two types of media. In my case, that's hard drive and optical.

  15. #15
    Sophomore Member Great Gig's Avatar
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    Keep a copy at work, you could even keep a copy in the boot of your car
    Tim

    "Songs are really just very interesting things to be doing with the air."
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  16. #16
    Junior Member Jsmith's Avatar
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    I am surprised more people are not using online backup solutions for offsite support. I use Crashplan for my offsite backup. A two year unlimited size backup is $114. This is not much more than a 1TB drive.
    - It is hosted so I don't have to worry about a hardware failure on my side.
    - It is offsite so that is taken care of.
    - It runs on Mac or Linux so I can backup from my Mac or VortexBox.
    - I can schedule it to only run during specific hours (typically 1:00 Am to 6:00 Am) so there is no chance it is when I am listening to music.
    - It detects new files and automatically backs them up so there is no thought involved.

    I have done a file recovery and compared to the original and it matches perfect.
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  17. #17
    Freshman Member Ralf Hutter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jsmith View Post
    I am surprised more people are not using online backup solutions for offsite support. I use Crashplan for my offsite backup.

    I have done a file recovery and compared to the original and it matches perfect.
    How long would it take for the initial upload? In my case it would be around 3TB.

  18. #18
    Junior Member Jsmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralf Hutter View Post
    How long would it take for the initial upload? In my case it would be around 3TB.
    Well it all depends on your WAN upload speeds.

    If you are willing to pay extra money to speed it up, most online places offer a seeding process. They will mail you a hard drive for the initial large backup. Once they receive it, it is uploaded and you do incremental from there.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralf Hutter View Post
    How long would it take for the initial upload? In my case it would be around 3TB.
    I'm doing an initial upload of my entire iTunes library (approx 2.5TB). I'm looking at a progress bar that says "6.4 months remaining." And it's not April Fools' Day.
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  20. #20
    Amateur iago's Avatar
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    And you are lucky. My upload speed is approximately 50 kB/s (this is why it's called asymmetric DSL), which would mean something over 365 days for a full backup. Not really useful ...
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  21. #21
    Junior Member Jsmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iago View Post
    And you are lucky. My upload speed is approximately 50 kB/s (this is why it's called asymmetric DSL), which would mean something over 365 days for a full backup. Not really useful ...
    Not real useful to you!

    If you check out the following thread on this site, you will see many on here have very capable internet speeds for online backup.

    Internet speeds...

    Also, you live in Germany and according to this the average broadband speeds there exceed those in the U.S. So it is entirely possible for you to get higher speeds.

    Internet Speeds Around the World [infographic]

    When you take into account how often hard drives crap out, having multiple drives to sync between home and offsite, and other factors, you may even consider bumping up the internet speed as the cost difference may not be that much.
    Audirvana Plus on 27" iMac --> Moon Audio Blue Dragon USB --> Oppo HA-1 w/ Cullen Cables Crossover Series power cable--> Beyerdynamic T1 with Moon Audio Black Dragon balanced cable

  22. #22
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    I think my next step in this process is going to be taking a harder look at Amazon Glacier. I can afford $25-$30/mo to store a copy of my iTunes library in a place far, far away. Getting the data back all at once if I ever have to restore looks like it may be fairly expensive, and I'm not sure I understand how to handle incremental additions. May be time to get on the phone.
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  23. #23
    Since many years I have my music on a NAS. When copying music files from my computer to my NAS I copy these files in parallel to an external hard disk connected to my computer. A few weeks ago my NAS crashed due to a severe bug in a firmware update. I had to replace all the disks in the NAS. Thanks to my backup it took only 3 days to copy all my music (over 7 Tb) back to the NAS. Working this way I have always an up to date backup without much effort.