Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1

    Playing files from external hard drive or ethernet connected NAS

    Hello all,
    I just fired up my new audio PC that only has an internal 128 GB SSD that stores windows 7 and J.River MC 17. All of my audio files are on a seperate Laptop and backed up on an external 1 TB SeaGate HDD. I connected the external HDD via the USB 3.0 to the new audio PC and attempted to play some music off of it. However, I could not. In MC17 I tried to load a library via File/Library/Import and Browse to my external HDD but the folder that holds the music was not visible. I'm wondering if I am missing something obvious or is there something that is preventing me from playing music off of the Seagate HDD. Playing from the external HDD is only a stopgap solution as I eventually want to play off of a Network Attached Storage (NAS) that I plan to attach to my wireless router via an ethernet cable. The router is attached to the Audio PC also via ethernet cable. I plan to eventually store all of my music on the NAS and have it serve the music files to the audio PC.
    I'd really appreciate some help. As you may have guessed I am new to computer audio so please make sure your advice is not too tech gargin heavy as I may not get it. Thanks, Garth

  2. #2
    Male Member crisnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,876
    Hi Garth,

    It should work from your usb hdd, unless it's a usb3 problem. Here's what you should try first.

    1. Make sure you can see your drive through Win Explorer
    2. In JRiver MC go to Import
    3. Select import Single folder, Next
    4. Browse
    5. Click on Computer
    6. Select the proper Hdd, OK
    7. Select the folder, Ok
    8. Select the file types you want to import, Finish

    That should do it.
    If the Hdd doesn't appear under Computer, try plugging it into a different usb port, or try a usb2 port.
    If that fails, try booting your computer with the hdd attached.
    If that fails, try the hdd on your laptop to see if it appears and then try it with JRiver MC on the laptop.

    Good luck.

    -Chris

  3. #3
    Hi Crisnee,

    Hi frani, My external harddrive was originally purchased to back up my laptop. So it has software on it designed to restore the data if the laptop crashes and so forth. So my music files are in an odd folder called My Replica. It is like a separate drive but it does not have a letter associated with it. It is referred to as a system folder. I don't know if that makes any difference from a computing stand point. I can "see" and navigate to the My Replica drive that has the music using windows explorer. When trying to Import a library with media center 17 i can see aspects of my seagate drive but not the My Replica drive (or folder). However, when I go to File/Open Media File and navigate to My Replica, I can then see my music files but nothing happens when I double click on them. Of course if I do the same action but navigate to the music files on my laptop and double click on them, I then get music.

    This might just be an idiosyncrasy of my backup HDD and is ultimately not a deal breaker because I want to play files off of a NAS device anyway. I am just concerned that I might run into the same problem with the NAS that I am having now with the SeaGate HDD.

  4. #4
    Male Member crisnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,876
    Perhaps you could move the files out of the system folder onto the main part of the drive in the root directory, into a new folder called something like MyMusic and then set your backup to bypass backing up whatever music you've been backing up. The Hdd does have a letter associated with it, doesn't it?

    Your system folder maybe locked or read only to you, so you may have to copy the files out of it and then stop backing up the music, or copy the music files from the original location. How much space do you have left on the drive?

    As to JRiver working with a NAS, it will work with just about anything. Why do you want to use a NAS anyway? Why not just get another hdd? They're cheap and will work just fine and are a lot simpler to deal with. The NAS is only more useful if you need computing power on your hdd or you have some special purpose, which you don't seem to have.

    -Chris

  5. #5
    I found that playing from NAS didn't sound as good as an external HDD and others have said they found the same thing. The difference is not big but worth considering. So I use the NAS for auto backups and play from local disks.

  6. #6
    Masters Level Member ted_b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Westlake, OH, USA
    Posts
    5,177
    Quote Originally Posted by Badpenny View Post
    I found that playing from NAS didn't sound as good as an external HDD and others have said they found the same thing. The difference is not big but worth considering. So I use the NAS for auto backups and play from local disks.
    Be careful with "others have found the same thing" to send a message that we all agree. I have reported here a couple times that my gigabit Synology NAS sounds as good, if not better, than my local USB Oyen digital drive. Thsi is with Linux MPD server, Mac Mini (w/ Pure Music and/or Audirvana Plus) and pc with J River). Rob Robinson, Pure Music founder/designer, says same thing. And a gigabit NAS (assuming gigabit all the way through system to server) is theoretically faster than USB 2.0 or firewire (although music files don't even need that speed), is acoustically isolated (next room), and is electrically isolated...so no reason it would be worse. I'd suspect your switches or cabling as a source of bottlenecking or noise in between, not the NAS per se.
    "We're all bozos on this bus"....F.T.

  7. #7
    Masters Level Member ted_b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Westlake, OH, USA
    Posts
    5,177
    Quote Originally Posted by crisnee View Post
    Perhaps you could move the files out of the system folder onto the main part of the drive in the root directory, into a new folder called something like MyMusic and then set your backup to bypass backing up whatever music you've been backing up. The Hdd does have a letter associated with it, doesn't it?

    Your system folder maybe locked or read only to you, so you may have to copy the files out of it and then stop backing up the music, or copy the music files from the original location. How much space do you have left on the drive?

    The NAS is only more useful if you need computing power on your hdd or you have some special purpose, which you don't seem to have.

    -Chris
    Chrisnee, a good quality NAS is very useful for large libraries, and isolating the file system (acoustically, electrically, etc). I have 5 TB...do you have a nice silent hdd for me?
    "We're all bozos on this bus"....F.T.

  8. #8
    Hi ted_b.

    For the record, my Synology NAS does not sound as good as my eSata connected hard drive.

    When I say people have said the same thing to me, that is what I actually mean. Some of my audio buddies tried a NAS and reported they felt it was marginally worse, suggesting to me my experience probably wasn't down to cables or switches. I never attempted to imply anything more than the words I used and will continue to post things I know to be true, and I reckon that is being careful enough thanks. Your pontifications about one being superior because it must produce less noise interference are speculation. Masquerading logical deductions as fact is something that may require more care don't you think?

    Nothing in my words suggested we all agree on my opinion here. I am sure that is not true. Feel free to disagree.

  9. #9
    Masters Level Member ted_b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Westlake, OH, USA
    Posts
    5,177
    Badpenny,
    I am sorry that you thought I came across as high and mighty. I was simply responding to your comments to let others know that not all NAS users are disappointed. I am surprised that your first posts here immediately lead to calling my response "pontifications" and claiming I am "masquerading logical deductions as fact"...seems a bit much, but I guess we'll learn to get used to your approach. Welcome to CA, regardless.
    "We're all bozos on this bus"....F.T.

  10. #10
    Ted_b, this is too petty to continue with. Let's get back to the OP's topic.

  11. #11
    Male Member crisnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,876
    Quote Originally Posted by ted_b View Post
    Chrisnee, a good quality NAS is very useful for large libraries, and isolating the file system (acoustically, electrically, etc). I have 5 TB...do you have a nice silent hdd for me?
    You need to read more carefully. I said unless you have a special use for one. The OP didn't seem to, as he seems to want to go simple. In that case I think a NAS would be overkill, especially for someone who is not very familiar or at ease with computer stuff.

    On the other hand I have nothing against using a NAS, as a matter of fact I have one. However, I don't use it anymore because I have several silent usb hdds that I like better.

    -Chris

  12. #12
    Crisnee, I probably don't need a NAS but it seems to me to be a good option to back up all of my data and to do it in a redundant fashion as to prevent against loosing my data. I also want it to be outside of my listening room to keep down on noise. Also, this way I won't have any noisy or moving parts attached to my "Caps" like audio PC I keeping with the CAPS philosophy. I am a little nervous about getting it dialed in though. Hopefully it won't be daunting.

    Ted: I am looking at synology, QNAP and a zyxel nsa325. I know that Zyxel gets some bad reviews but the NSA325 seems feature packed an the specs put it at a level above its price. The most that I want to spend for the NAS is $300 with out the drives but I'd like to spend less. Do you have any advice or recommendations.

    Badpenny: Yes I'm concerned about a NAS having a negative effect on sound but it seems like the best option for me. I'll just have to try and see.

    Thanks to all, Garth

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by gakaudio View Post
    Badpenny: Yes I'm concerned about a NAS having a negative effect on sound but it seems like the best option for me. I'll just have to try and see.
    Hi Garth, as I say it really isn't a significant sound difference so I think your approach is good. I have only had good experiences with Synology after trying four others, but I certainly haven't tried a lot. It can be pretty simple to set up if you just need it for copying files around and backing up. The only thing I ever regretted was not getting a bigger one for expandability and further redundancy. Once you have a NAS you will probably find other uses for it.

    One option to save money is to build a VortexBox with an old PC if you have one lying around. For what you appear to need it might be the cheapest option. If you have the PC, and given the software is a free download, you could get started for the cost of the disks and then transfer them into a Synology, or similar, if you don't like it.

  14. #14
    Sophomore Member astrotoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    287
    I am solving the quality vs ease of use by setting up a double system.
    I recently got a Synology NAS to help with the storage issues for my vinyl ripping project. It has 12 3TB drives in the Synology equivalent to RAID 6. I have been playing files with it and it sounds quite good. I also have a Drobo FS with 5 2TB drives, so with redundancy, I have about 35TB of storage (ripping at 192/24). However, I also have 3 128GB SS drives in my computer, so if I really want the best sound, I copy the file over to a SS drive and play it from that. However, the balance of ease of use vs sound quality means I usually don't do that extra step. I decided when I started the project that my time was the most costly (10,000 records and tapes at about 1 hour per record plus post processing which takes place when I am asleep). So buying a really good ADAC and associated equipment and software and getting expert instruction from consultants was worth the expense and inconvenience of the long learning curve. (My system includes a Pacific Microsonics Model Two, Pyramix software with Mykerinos card and Izotope RX2 processing software. This is all "pro" equipment and not intuitive at all.) However, my wife cannot play anything in the system. So I have recently decided to get a Berkeley Audio DAC and their USB link to use with an existing Mac Mini with Pure Music. I will be connecting several external HD's with most of the files I have already ripped, about 10TB worth. I may even attach the NAS drive that I am not using for ripping to the Mac Mini. (In addition to the RAID NAS drives, I also copy all the files that I rip and process on external HD's - for an extra layer of protection). She can then scroll through the Pure Music iTunes menu and the system changes sample rates (since I also have ripped CD's and other hirez files - at 88/24, 96/24 and 176/24 and just play whatever she wants. I can even listen to my ripped and processed files while simultaneously ripping. Not quite the quality of the Model Two, but I hope it will be quite good.

    Larry

  15. #15
    Sophomore Member astrotoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    287
    I now have my "convenient system" set up and running. It has a Mac Mini feeding a BADA USB into a BADA Series II DAC. I found that although I had bought Pure Music, Audirvana Plus seems to work better - I was having some issues with decoding 176/24 with Pure Music. One advantage to having a top notch dealer/consultant (Tim Marutani in my case) is that after I downloaded the software, I couldn't get any music to play. I am not a computer expert (I can download and reboot, but that is about all). Tim had me download Teamviewer and he spent the time to remotely fix the issues. Well worth paying retail!!

    Larry

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Badpenny View Post
    I found that playing from NAS didn't sound as good as an external HDD and others have said they found the same thing. The difference is not big but worth considering. So I use the NAS for auto backups and play from local disks.
    Interesting that a number of high end audio companies including Linn and Naim not only recommend a NAS for listening but their whole digital product lines are developed utilizing a NAS as the source. This by the way goes all the way up to their state of the art digital products which can cost as much as $23,000.

    Oh, and yes, they sound superb and are fully competitive with direct coupled DACs from companies such as DCS and ARC.
    David