• Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Reference Series Review



    Rarely do I hear a component that's truly a game changer, a component that's so good I can't stop listening through it, and a component that's so good it renders much of the competition irrelevant. I can't remember, off the top of my head, the last time I heard such a component. That is, before the Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Reference Series arrived. The Alpha DAC RS, every bit a true game changer, blew me away from the first listen in my system. Since its arrival I've listened to more complete albums and heard more new sounds from old albums than any time in my life. The Alpha DAC RS is so good and such a game changer it may force consumers to reconsider their desire for high resolution music. Sure the Alpha DAC RS can reproduce high resolution music better than any DAC I've heard in my system, but its absolute magic can be heard with standard CD quality 16 bit / 44.1 kHz material. The Alpha DAC RS is without question the best DAC I've heard anywhere when it comes to 16/44.1 playback. I've never heard detail, delicacy, and transparency with my favorite music like I have when listening through this DAC. The Alpha DAC RS is so outstanding that I equate its presence in my system to that of a new pair of loudspeakers. That's correct; the Alpha DAC RS had an impact on my system equivalent to a new pair of loudspeakers. In fact, the Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Reference Series is the most remarkable sounding product I've ever reviewed.


    Alpha DAC Reference Series


    The Berkeley Audio Design team is well known for pursuing perfection of performance and producing peerless products. The original Alpha DAC is considered by many to be the best $5,000 DAC money can buy. The company's subsequent USB to AES converter has been unequalled when it comes to sound quality and electrical isolation in D-to-D converters. Pushing boundaries and shooting for unparalleled performance is not an easy task and frequently takes quite a bit of time. Such is the case with the Alpha DAC Reference Series. According to Berkeley Audio Design's Michael Ritter, the Alpha DAC RS contains proprietary parts that didn't exist prior to the creation of the DAC. During the initial design stages of the RS 'Berkeley' asked several manufacturers to build certain parts to its specifications. All but one of the companies said no because it was difficult to build and there was no market for such impeccably spec'd parts. In addition the cost of the parts ended up being 40x greater than parts used in the Alpha DAC Series 2 or the Alpha USB.

    Internal parts are but one piece of the Alpha DAC RS puzzle. The other major piece is intellectual property. 'Berkeley' previously made a $5,000 DAC sound as good as or better than many DACs costing several times more money. To do this requires the intellectual know-how that other DAC manufacturers, who just assemble parts and follow chip manufacturers' app notes, simply don't have. Talking to Berkeley's lead Engineer Michael "Pflash" Pflaumer, it's clear that the Alpha DAC RS contains engineering wizardry and original ideas that the previous 'Berkeley' products don't contain. The Alpha DAC RS isn't a sibling of the original Alpha DAC, rather it's a close cousin. Both DACs have the same designer, but the Reference Series is so above and beyond that it's in a league of its own. This time, using a mix of proprietary parts and vast intellectual property, Berkeley Audio Design has created a $16,000 DAC that may be the best in the world at any price.

    One of the strengths of the Alpha DAC RS that make it such a great component is its ability to playback standard resolution (16/44.1) material better than any DAC I've heard. According to many DAC designers, playback of standard resolution is where the rubber meets the road, not only because the vast majority of music is released at 16/44.1, but because it takes considerable expertise to develop digital filters for CD quality material. This is where Berkeley Audio Design excels. Michael "Pflash" Pflaumer's digital filter mastery is the stuff of legend in high end audio. One only needs to listen to the Alpha DAC RS at 16/44.1 to hear Pflash's superior skills shine. There's no chip a manufacture can purchase and implement that comes close to replicating 'Berkeley's' custom filtering technology.

    Now for the fun part, telling the world how the Alpha DAC RS sounds with some of my favorite music. The RS single handedly sent me into a Natalie Merchant binge that lasted a couple weeks. I couldn't stop listening to Natalie's new self-titled album and her Motherland release from 2001. Both albums are the standard issue, released at 44.1 kHz and not remastered. The detail and delicacy brought out by the Alpha DAC RS on both albums is unparalleled. For example, the track Maggie Said from the 2014 Natalie Merchant album has incredible separation and delineation between instruments. So much so that I can't get this good of sound even through my Sennheiser HD600, Audeze LCD-XC, or JH Audio JH13 in-ear monitors. The first track on the album, Lady Bird, opens with a delicate drum roll. Listening through other DACs and even through headphones, the drums tend to sound like paper, as if the drummer is striking a couple sheets of loose leaf paper from the Dollar Store. Through the Alpha DAC RS it's possible to hear the texture of the drum heads. I'm willing to bet any competent drummer could identify the exact drum kit, and even the sticks used by the drummer, after listening to this track through the Alpha DAC RS.

    Continuing my Natalie Merchant kick, I spent countless hours listening to her Motherland album. Track two, titled Motherland, features a guitar, banjo, accordion, and some of the richest sounding vocals Natalie has ever produced. I've never heard this track sound so good and Natalie's vocals sound as wonderful as I have when listening through the Alpha DAC RS. The delicate accordion comes and goes in the background landing like a butterfly with sore feet. The banjo and guitar have terrifically distinct sounds that can be heard even at the lowest volumes through the 'RS'. In fact, I've never heard a DAC excel more at low volumes than the Alpha DAC RS. Listening to the entire Motherland album I kept the volume at such low levels that the crickets outside my listening room drowned out the quiet passages more than a few times. This is in stark contrast to listening through some DACs that lack resolution and force the listener to turn up the volume a notch for every track. After an hour of listening one's ears are tired and ready to retire for the evening. My experience with the Alpha DAC RS couldn't be more the opposite. I never wanted to stop listening once during the entire review period.

    Classical music isn't traditionally one of my favorite genres. However, when a component like the Alpha DAC RS is placed into my system I feel the need to listen to all of my music as if it was all new. During this review I frequently said to myself, "I wonder what X or Y sounds like through the RS." It was as close to the kid before Christmas feeling as I could have as an adult. Thus, I played the Kansas City Symphony's Britten's Orchestra recorded and released at 24 bit / 176.4 kHz by Reference Recordings. This album demonstrated the Alpha DAC RS' ability to reproduce transients like no other DAC I've heard. About 4:20 into the track Passacaglia things get real interesting. The horns start out quite delicate augmenting the string section that is building the scene. By 5:30 into the track the horn section is leading the way in the most transparent sounding symphonic reproduction I've yet heard. At 5:45 into the track the deep horns start to snap and the drums create an incredible sounding crescendo. Then all is quiet with the exception of a soft and delicate string section in recovery from the event that just took place. Throughout the track the Alpha DAC RS appears to only reproduce the music. There's no memorializing of an event after it happens and there certainly are no rounded edges of transients. This DAC starts and stops like no other.

    Organic and transparent is how I describe listening to Jack Johnson's Brushfire Fairytales through the Alpha DAC RS. This isn't the most well recorded album, but through the 'RS' something magical comes out of each track. The Alpha DAC RS isn't adding anything or forcing a Hi-Fi signature on the album, rather more sounds and nuances are coming through now than ever before through any other DAC. The track Flake features a very soft steel drum in the left channel and acoustic guitar in the right channel at the beginning. The guitar sounds incredibly organic and realistic while the steel drum smoothly floats in the background with its soft presence. Through less resolute DACs I frequently turn up the volume during this part of the track because I can't hear the steel drum enough for my liking. Through the Alpha DAC RS the steel drum magically comes through appropriately soft but appropriately present. It's really magical to hear these seemingly antithetical (soft / present) characteristics come through with delicacy and transparency like never before.

    Closing out the review period I wanted to push the bass limits of the Alpha DAC RS. What I had heard up to this point was incredibly tight and deep bass from more traditional sources like rock and roll and jazz. It was time for a little Jay Z, one of my favorite hip hop artists of all time. Jay Z's MTV Unplugged (with the Roots band) is a great sounding album but it doesn't have the bass of the Magna Carta... Holy Grail album. After warming up with MTV Unplugged I switched to track Holy Grail featuring Justin Timberlake. A synthetic piano and somewhat synthetic sounding vocal start the track before a huge bass beat kicks in. Under the right conditions I'm sure one could blow woofers into a listener's lap. Fortunately the track isn't just a bass monster / demo track. The deep beat is great as are the lyrics with a sample of Nirvana's Smells Like Teen Spirit. The Alpha DAC RS puts out the deepest and tightest bass of any DAC I've yet heard. Listening to this deep tight bass gave me a similar feeling to listening to soft and present steel drums from Jack Johnson. The deep bass was omnipresent as it was supposed to be, but it wasn't overpowering. Jay Z's and Timberlake's vocals were clearly audible and intelligible as were the plethora of other sounds going on in the track. Chalk this magic up to the Alpha DAC RS and its brilliant designer Michael "Pflash" Pflaumer and the rest of the 'Berkeley' team who took part in creating the best DAC on the market.


    Conclusion


    The Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Reference Series is a DAC for the ages. Delicacy, detail, and unparalleled transparency are hallmarks of the RS. Reproducing soft yet present background instruments as clearly as the lead guitar is something only the Alpha DAC RS has done in my system. This DAC is capable of hooking the listener in to hours long listening sessions even at the expense of getting other work done. In other words, the Alpha DAC RS reproduces addicting sound. The Reference Series is what the term "game changer" was meant to describe. It's a PCM only DAC that renders most other universal DACs on the market irrelevant. Irrelevant because they cost more and don't sound as good. A DAC that can make standard resolution (16/44.1) material sound as good as high resolution is a true game changer. The advanced digital filtering algorithms created by Berkeley Audio Design do exactly that with 16/44.1 music. I know of no DAC available today that can reproduce Redbook CD content as well as the Alpha DAC RS. Period. If I could afford it and my job allowed it, the Alpha DAC RS is the only DAC I'd use for the foreseeable future.






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    Product Information:
    • Product - Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC Reference Series
    • Price - $16,000
    • Product Page - Link






    Where To Buy:

    The Audio Salon





    Ciamara








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    Comments 166 Comments
    1. ted_b's Avatar
      ted_b -
      I guess you liked it.

      What was the primary source and path? Did you find it immune or sensitive to cabling? Did you attempt to convert DSD to 176k+, and if so, how did it sound vs native (EMM)?

      Thx
      Ted
    1. kirkmc's Avatar
      kirkmc -
      Hmm... Sorry to be the first commenter and be skeptical. If I understand correctly, you're saying that this device negates every other audio device you've ever heard. That suggests to me that it is altering the music - arguably in a way that you enjoy - but not "playing the music as the artist intended," to use an increasingly common trope. Because, Chris, I know you have a lot of experience with high-end equipment, and the mere thought that one such device is so different from all the others makes it hard to imagine that it is faithful.

      Does that make sense? I'm sincerely curious about this, because you're not generally the type to be this effusive.

      Kirk
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by kirkmc View Post
      Hmm... Sorry to be the first commenter and be skeptical. If I understand correctly, you're saying that this device negates every other audio device you've ever heard. That suggests to me that it is altering the music - arguably in a way that you enjoy - but not "playing the music as the artist intended," to use an increasingly common trope. Because, Chris, I know you have a lot of experience with high-end equipment, and the mere thought that one such device is so different from all the others makes it hard to imagine that it is faithful.

      Does that make sense? I'm sincerely curious about this, because you're not generally the type to be this effusive.

      Kirk
      Hi Kirk - First, what are you doing reading Computer Audiophile on one of the biggest days in Apple history? Only kidding :~)

      I certainly understand where you are coming from and you are correct that I'm never this effusive about anything. This product really has to be heard to be believed. I think your statements / skepticism could be turned around and be just as valid by saying that everything else is altering the music and changing it in a way that the Alpha DAC RS doesn't. Most DAC designers seek perfection. 'Berkeley' has come as close as possible to perfection whereas the other designers haven't touched this level yet.

      P.S. I'll be following your tweets this afternoon. There's no way Apple is going to call it the iWatch :~)
    1. ted_b's Avatar
      ted_b -
      Quote Originally Posted by kirkmc View Post
      Hmm... Sorry to be the first commenter and be skeptical. If I understand correctly, you're saying that this device negates every other audio device you've ever heard. That suggests to me that it is altering the music - arguably in a way that you enjoy - but not "playing the music as the artist intended," to use an increasingly common trope. Because, Chris, I know you have a lot of experience with high-end equipment, and the mere thought that one such device is so different from all the others makes it hard to imagine that it is faithful.

      Does that make sense? I'm sincerely curious about this, because you're not generally the type to be this effusive.

      Kirk
      Kirk,
      Why wouldn't the perspective be that this device is altering the sound even less than anything he ever heard? Why more?

      Oops, Chris was typing while I was and reached same point.
    1. kirkmc's Avatar
      kirkmc -
      Chris,

      I'm a multi-tasking super-hero. :-) And, yeah, iWatch? That sounds too limiting.

      I see your point. You're suggesting that everything else is putting a veil over the music? But this suggests that even those oxygen-free mono-directional cables don't make much of a difference then... (Sorry, couldn't resist.)

      It's quite a bold statement. I'm curious to see if other reviewers say the same thing.

      Kirk
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by ted_b View Post
      I guess you liked it.

      What was the primary source and path? Did you find it immune or sensitive to cabling? Did you attempt to convert DSD to 176k+, and if so, how did it sound vs native (EMM)?

      Thx
      Ted
      I used the Sonore Signature Series Rendu for much of the review. This allowed me to use JRiver as the DLNA server and JRemote for control. I have a copy of all my DSD material in both native DSD and converted 176.4 kHz (converted with JRiver offline). I played plenty of the 176.4 PCM stuff through the RS and it sounded better than the native through other DACs. The RS is a game changer.
    1. bobflood's Avatar
      bobflood -
      I have always thought that proper implementation of the 44.1/16 standard would reduce the demand for for Hi-Res formats. With any luck there will be a trickle down of this technology in the future.
    1. kirkmc's Avatar
      kirkmc -
      Quote Originally Posted by bobflood View Post
      I have always thought that proper implementation of the 44.1/16 standard would reduce the demand for for Hi-Res formats. With any luck there will be a trickle down of this technology in the future.
      Hmm, that's interesting. That does, however, negate the claims of audiophiles who say that high-res music is superior.

      So, no need for Pono if we have $16K DACs? :-)

      Kirk
    1. ted_b's Avatar
      ted_b -
      Given the investment-grade status of this digital piece, and given that the digital sector of the audio world is the fastest changing, what is Berkeley's future-proofing or update/upgrade capability for this unit? I see there is no ethernet port nor USB port (two classic paths for field-updatable firmware).
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by ted_b View Post
      Given the investment-grade status of this digital piece, and given that the digital sector of the audio world is the fastest changing, what is Berkeley's future-proofing or update/upgrade capability for this unit? I see there is no ethernet port nor USB port (two classic paths for field-updatable firmware).
      Berkeley has typically updated firmware through WAV files just like dCS. Playing them through the DAC updates the firmware.
    1. Steve7's Avatar
      Steve7 -
      So, what did you really think of it? I'm a little surprised that at this price, it doesn't incorporate at least native DSD. I really hope to be able to hear this some day, but it'll require some saving and/or a second mortgage. You're right - I'm envious!
    1. joelha's Avatar
      joelha -
      I want to jump in and completely echo Chris' comments here.
      I have the unit in my home system and believe it is one of the most significant purchases I've ever made in this hobby.
      It's almost unprecedented in my experience that a single component could improve the sound to the degree this one has.
      And I find that surprising because my brain wants to tell me that the playback of bit perfect digital files simply shouldn't have the kind of potential for improvement that I've heard.
      It's funny Chris would make the comment about the Berkeley's playback of redbook files as I had sent him a message recently saying that I couldn't believe so much detail could be extracted from "simple" 16/44.1 files.
      Chris is not exaggerating. This DAC offers not a meaningful but a dramatic improvement in the sound it processes.
      I wasn't prepared to be this much of a believer but I'm a big (and very happy) believer now.
      Listen to it in a system you know well and you could become a believer as well.
      Joel
    1. ecwl's Avatar
      ecwl -
      Chris, joelha, I was wondering if you tested out the digital volume function of the RS. The DAC is a bit pricey as an upgrade but if I were to sell my current DAC & preamp...
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by ecwl View Post
      Chris, joelha, I was wondering if you tested out the digital volume function of the RS. The DAC is a bit pricey as an upgrade but if I were to sell my current DAC & preamp...
      I only used the RS with its digital volume control. I connected the RS directly to Pass Labs amps.
    1. bobflood's Avatar
      bobflood -
      Hi Chris,

      Did you try it with the Aries using the Aries' AES/EBU output? Strikes me that this would be a good combo.

      Bob
    1. manisandher's Avatar
      manisandher -
      "A DAC that can make standard resolution (16/44.1) material sound as good as high resolution is a true game changer."

      In which case, Berkeley are some 3 years behind the real game changer... IMHO of course.

      Mani.
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by bobflood View Post
      Hi Chris,

      Did you try it with the Aries using the Aries' AES/EBU output? Strikes me that this would be a good combo.

      Bob
      Not yet.
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by manisandher View Post
      "A DAC that can make standard resolution (16/44.1) material sound as good as high resolution is a true game changer."

      In which case, Berkeley are some 3 years behind the real game changer... IMHO of course.

      Mani.
      Quite an antagonistic comment Mani. I've likely heard what your talking about and it's no game changer.
    1. manisandher's Avatar
      manisandher -
      Quote Originally Posted by The Computer Audiophile View Post
      I've likely heard what your talking about and it's no game changer.
      What? You've likely heard a Phasure NOS1? Come on, you either have or you haven't... If you have, which version was it and with which PC and software player? What system were you using it with? With a preamp?

      You know I have a Pacific Microsonics Model Two. Certainly a SOTA ADC, but considered by many (you?) to be a SOTA DAC too. 3 years ago it was totally embarrassed by the original NOS1. Totally embarrassed. The latest NOS1a is a lot better than the original. On a final note, virtually no NOS1 owners are interested in hirez - most redbook sounds pretty much as good (upsampled in XXHE).

      Chris, I don't mean to sound antagonistic, but I think I'm entitled to consider the original Phasure NOS1 a true 'game changer'.

      Mani.
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Quote Originally Posted by manisandher View Post
      What? You've likely heard a Phasure NOS1? Come on, you either have or you haven't... If you have, which version was it and with which PC and software player? What system were you using it with? With a preamp?

      You know I have a Pacific Microsonics Model Two. Certainly a SOTA ADC, but considered by many (you?) to be a SOTA DAC too. 3 years ago it was totally embarrassed by the original NOS1. Totally embarrassed. The latest NOS1a is a lot better than the original. On a final note, virtually no NOS1 owners are interested in hirez - most redbook sounds pretty much as good (upsampled in XXHE).

      Chris, I don't mean to sound antagonistic, but I think I'm entitled to consider the original Phasure NOS1 a true 'game changer'.

      Mani.
      I figured that was the DAC you alluded to in your comment. Yes, I've heard it and stand by my opinion.