• Auraliti PK100 File Player Review

    Demian Martin and Ray Burnham of Auraliti must frequently feel like Russel Ziskey teaching Basic English in the movie Stripes [Link]link. Almost everybody mispronounces their company name Auraliti. I admit to mangling the name a few times myself. An easy way to learn and remember the correct pronunciation is to repeat the words Audio and Reality as fast as one can over and over. Soon enough the tongue and lips get lazy and a shortened version of the two words is spoken as Auraliti. The name rhymes with the company's tagline - Welcome to the new audio reality. Auraliti's first product is the PK100. The name is not nearly as creative but mispronunciations will be very limited. The PK100 is an extremely basic yet highly refined purpose built file player. Readers seeking a multi-purpose computer capable of playing music and calculating the monthly grocery budget should look elsewhere. Computer audiophiles seeking a simple user interface, with no user intervention required or allowed, and automatic bit perfect playback of music from 16/44.1 kHz through 24/192 kHz may want to seek a new audio reality with the Auraliti PK100.



     


    What is it, What Does it Do, What Doesn't it Do?


    What is it?

    The PK100 file player is a computer underneath it's understated black metal housing. This computer is configured to function like a toaster. When I put bread in my toaster and depress the lever I can guarantee toast will pop up after a few minutes. It's that simple. Insert bread + depress lever = toast every time. The PK100 is a file player that requires no setup. In fact it cannot be setup by the end user. The PK100 arrives from Auraliti pre-configured and set in a read-only state of operation. When I connect music via USB hard drive to the PK100 the music appears in one of the many remote control applications and starts paying when I hit the play button within the app. Connect music + Select music = Play music. It's so easy even a caveman could … oh wait that's been used already. The PK100 design can be described with an analogy to the automobiles used in NASCAR races. The cars are purpose built to drive in an oval turning only to the left at a high rate of speed. For example Dale Earnhardt, Jr. drives a Chevrolet Impala on the track. This Impala would not function as an every day driver because all the modern conveniences such as power locks, windshield wipers, trunk, back seat, and normal tires, to name a few, have been removed. The PK100 is designed to play music and will not function as an every day computer because all the modern conveniences such as printing, office applications, and internet browsers have been removed or excluded from installation. It's not even possible to rip CDs with the PK100. Geeks will be happy to read the PK100 uses Linux with MPD installed to a small solid state flash drive set as read-only on an Intel D945GSEJT Johnstown Mini-ITX motherboard and a completely fanless design. Non-geeks should know that this is a great configuration that's nearly indestructible short of physical damage. The power can be removed and the user can click, the mouse, more times than people speaking the Khoisan languageslink without impacting the file player's configuration or functionality. Astute readers may have already noticed the PK100 is very similar to the Bryston BDP-1. The two players use the same concept of a Linux operating system, MPD, attaching USB drives, and iPhone control. Many of the differences between the PK100 and the BDP-1 are hardware related. The most obvious visible difference being the expensive casework housing the Bryston BDP-1. The PK100 is a very small square running 7.5 x 7.5 x 2.25 in and weighing in at 5 lbs. including power supply.



     

    What Does it Do?

    The Auraliti PK100 file player is not a jack of all trades music server. It simply connects to a USB drive full of music, an external DAC, and an Ethernet port. The PK100 supports zero-config or what's commonly called Apple's Bonjour communication protocol that enables configuration free connecting from one device to another. Bonjour allows users of the PK100 to open a web browser and type http://auraliti-player.local into the URL box and be presented with the player's web interface. There is no need to find the player's IP Address on the local area network in order to connect to the unit. The player comes with a simplistic web interface that directs users to its pre-installed control software (NeoMPC) and to other sites where users can download other applications to control the PK100. The built-in NeoMPC interface is text based and allows the user to browse the folders of the attached hard drives. It's very straight forward and doesn't require a training session before the user is well versed in using the player. NeoMPC functions very well on the iPad but is not the best control app for readers using an iPhone. The NeoMPC buttons are very small via the iPhone.

    One of the best things about the PK100 is it's only capable of outputting a bit perfect audio signal. Without any configuration options for the user there is no way to screw this one up. Most other players on the market require anywhere from minor to major adjustments before they're capable of bit perfect playback. The PK100 supports FLAC, WAV, AIFF, and MP3 according to Auraliti, but I was able to play some lossy 256 kbps AAC downloads from the iTunes Music Store without an issue. Another very impressive feature of the PK100 is its ability to play all relevant sample rates from 16 bit / 44.1 kHz through 24 bit / 192 kHz without a hiccup. The PK100 automatically changes the sample rate based on music selected for playback assuring the user of bit perfect operation. I like to test manufacturer's claims so this is one of the first items I test when receiving a product for review. The PK100 passed with flying colors.

    A feature I did not use is the built-in Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) with modified analog RCA outputs. The DAC is a 24 bit AKM that's capable of sample rates from 16/44.1 through 24/192. I prefer to use an external DAC with volume control and a few other features. The built-in DAC may be very nice for users just entering the computer audio world who don't want to purchase another piece of gear or simply don't have room for another box on their desk or in their living room. This is a great way start with a minimal outlay of cash.

     

    What doesn't it do?

    Understanding what a product does and does not do is key when making a smart purchasing decision. This way there are no surprises when the new product is connected to the audio system. There is nothing worse than purchasing one component and realizing another product of equal or greater value must be purchased in order for the initial product to function as needed. Readers considering the PK100 must know that another computer is required to use this file player. The other computer is not required while playing music rather it's required for housekeeping tasks such as ripping CDs and editing metadata.


    Here are some important considerations for potential PK100 buyers.

    1. No physical CD/DVD drive

    2. No ability to rip CDs

    3. No Network Attached Storage (NAS) support yet

    4. No usable onboard hard drive

    5. No physical buttons or user interface on the actual player chassis

    6. No USB or FireWire DAC support

    7. No Squeezebox / SqueezeCenter

    8. No iTunes music sharing capability

    9. No UPnP support




    Some readers will look at this list and consider the PK100 worthless. In fact that's a good thing because these readers are likely not the ideal user for the PK100. Readers seeking all the above features in a single box can immediately rule out this Auraliti unit and move on in their search for a music player or server. Remember the PK100 was created to play music and do it very well. There are many reasons why the PK100 doesn't offer the above features. There is no need for a physical CD/DVD drive since the player does not rip discs. The design decision to not include the CD ripping capability in the PK100 was very smart. Currently there are numerous applications that rip CDs very well and allow the user to edit the metadata. There's no reason for Auraliti to either reinvent the wheel with its own ripping app or to enable one of the open source ripping applications. In fact enabling the PK100 to rip CDs would require enabling many other features that have nothing to do with playing music. For example the PK100 would have to allow access to the attached hard drives over the network, for metadata editing purposes, thus becoming a network file sharing server. There is really no reason to enable features 100% of the time when they are used 1% of the time. The PK100 file player has a very purist design. Support for Network Attached Storage that would allow the PK100 to pull files from a NAS drive would be nice but would also involve more complexity from a design and usability perspective. I believe Auraliti is working on a NAS of its own that will function seamlessly with the PK100. No official release date has been provided as of this writing. The only drive the PK100 ships with is the onboard solid state flash drive. This drive is not usable for music storage as its very small and marked as read only. Auraliti was wise not to include a usable hard drive in this unit. Companies like Seagate, Hitachi, Toshiba, and Samsung are far better at selling and servicing hard drives than Auraliti. Plus, user size requirements are all over the board and advances in storage technology happen very quickly. If Auraliti did ship the PK100 with an internal hard drive I'm wiling to bet many users would replace it with a drive of their choice anyway. One feature the PK100 doesn't offer and the Bryston BDP-1 does is a front panel display with user interface. This type of display can have negative consequences on sound quality. According to Auraliti excluding such a display, "eliminates background processes which induce jitter inducing interrupts and noise from the GPU supplying a graphic interface." Readers who like the ability to see exactly what's happening or the ability to physically press play on an actual audio component may find the PK100's lack of onboard display frustrating. Perhaps the biggest potential show-stopper with the PK100 is its current lack of support for USB and FireWire DACs. Audiophiles with wonderful USB or FireWire DACs will have to think long and hard about replacing their DAC to accommodate the PK100's S/PDIF output. Auraliti did have a USB capable unit on display at The Show in Las Vegas this year but there is not scheduled release date yet. Lack of UPnP support, Squeezebox / SqueezeCenter support, and iTunes music sharing support are the three remaining items users should consider before purchasing the PK100. Some servers offer these options as they allow users to access or send music to other devices or rooms in one's house. It's been my experience that these server type features are best run from a NAS device not a high quality file player like the PK100. Again, Auraliti was wise to exclude these and many other features from the PK100. This file player is certainly not for everyone. Understanding what it doesn't offer should be something every potential purchaser considers.

     

    The Auraliti PK100 In My Listening Room

    In my listening room I used the PK100 in a few different systems. I spent a considerable amount of time with the unit connected to a new Peachtree iNova integrated amp with Peachtree D5 loudspeakers. I also used the PK100 connected to my Benchmark DAC1 PRE sitting on my desk with a pair of Sennheiser HD600 headphones. The PK100 produced absolutely no audible noise when placed at arms length on my desk. Originally this was not a configuration I was going to try but for testing purposes I gave it a shot and fell in love with this little system. The PK100 would be a great addition to many office audio systems no matter what components are already in place. Using one's office computer for music playback just doesn't cut it anymore once you've tried the PK100 approach. I highly recommend CA readers give this a shot.

    To give readers a better idea of how to use the PK100 I compiled a step by step list of the process I used in my system.


    1. Connected the PK100 to my home network via a single ethernet cable.

    2. Connected the PK100 to the Peachtree iNova via coaxial S/PDIF cable with a BNC connection on the PK100 end and a BNC with RCA adapter on the iNova end.

    3. On my OS X 10.6.6 MacBook Pro I formatted my external 750GB Oyen Digital USB hard drive as FAT32. This enabled me to read and write to this drive from my Mac or PC.

    4. On my Windows 7 PC (MacBook Pro running Boot Camp) I ripped music using dBpoweramp to the 750GB USB drive in FLAC format.

    5. I also copied AIFF files and other FLAC files from my NAS drive to the 750Gb USB drive.

    6. I ejected the 750GB USB drive from the MacBook Pro and connected the USB drive to the Auraliti PK100.

    7. On my MacBook Pro running OS X 10.6.6 I opened my web browser (Google Chrome) and typed http://auraliti-player.local into the URL box. This brings up the PK100 home page.

    8. Once a USB drive is connected the PK100 can take a few minutes to search the hard drive and create its local database of music contained on the drive. I used the NeoMPC user interface to check on the status of the database building process. This user interface is accessed by clicking a link on the PK100 home page.

    9. Once the database was fully populated I mainly used the free MPoDlink iPhone application to browse and play music straight from the connected 750GB USB drive. I also use NeoMPC from my iPad as there is no iPad version of MPod available at this time. An iPad version currently named MPaD is in development. I briefly used the Mac OS X application Theramin to control the PK100 but the experience was less than enjoyable.




    Example Configuration Using External dCS Debussy DAC



     



    The process to add music to the 750GB hard drive was very straight forward. I disconnected the drive form the PK100, connected it to my MacBook Pro, ripped a CD to the drive in any folder structure I wanted, ejected the drive from the MacBook Pro, and reconnected the drive to the PK100. While this process is easy I did get tired of moving the drive back and forth to add more music. I purchase three to five CDs per week which required me to go through the hard drive routine fairly often. Whether this is a show-stopper or not can only be answered by each individual. I would much prefer ripping my CDs to a NAS drive and refreshing the library on the PK100 with the click of a mouse or tap of the iPhone screen.




    The music I placed on the 750Gb hard drive for use with the PK100 was FLAC and AIFF originally ripped via dBpoweramp. Both types of files had all metadata including cover art embedded into each individual file. Using NeoMPC and MPod I was able to view all the metadata and cover art when paling FLAC files. FLAC is by far the best format for embedded metadata on all platforms except iTunes. MPod also handled AIFF embedded metadata without issue. NeoMPC on the other hand required a picture of the cover art be placed in each album folder and named folder.jpg in order to view AIFF cover art. Thus NeoMPC doesn't support embedded cover art with AIFF files. Ripping with dBpoweramp allows users to embed with cover art and simultaneously place the cover art into a folder.jpg file. This is a great way to cover more bases when ripping a collection. It's impossible to know what platform one will use in the future so this belt and suspenders approach is highly recommended.





             


     


    Sonically the PK100 out-punts its coverage or out-performs it's $799 price point by a long shot. The internal Juli@ audio card in combination with the single purpose finely tuned Linux operating system is every bit as good or better than a PC or Mac with Lynx AES16 audio card. It's impossible to compare apples to apples here because the Lynx AES16 cannot be placed into the PK100 chassis. It's very likely the Lynx would benefit from a simplified Linux OS, but I have a hard time believing it would sound better than the stock PK100. No doubt a fair amount of this great sound quality stems from PK100 designer Demian Martin's incredible knowledge and skill. Many Computer Audiophile readers already use components designed by Demian from Spectral Audio, NuForce, and a host of others for which Demian does't take credit publicly. He frequently shares much of his computer audio knowledge here on the CA forums. I'm always surprised when Demian spends his own time to research what may seem like an inconsequential issue raised by a CA reader and share his findings in a detailed response.

    Simply because I can I briefly compared the PK100 to my Pyramix machine with a several thousand dollar Mykerinos audio card running into a Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC. This is a totally ridiculous comparison on many levels including price and the user unfriendly professional software interface of Pyramix software. To my ears in my system the Pyramix / Mykerinos combination was clearly more resolving. In addition readers should know a very nice feature of the Mykerinios card, and a Lynx card, is the ability to externally clock the card from a DAC with word clock output such as the Weiss DAC202. External clocking is not a feature of the PK100 but I'm pretty positive nearly all PK100 users are thankful for this exclusion as an externally clocked card is quite cumbersome to operate.

     

    Conclusion

    The Auraliti PK100 is a finely tuned well designed computer file player. It's simple user interface that requires no tweaking is a major benefit to many computer audiophiles. The fact that users can't adjust any settings and obtain bit perfect playback automatically cannot be emphasized enough. this is a big deal. In my experience the most common cause of dissatisfaction with computer based sound quality is lack of bit perfect output. The PK100 completely solves this issue. Potential PK100 purchasers should ensure they've considered all the features this player offers and does not offer. This player is not a one size fits all music server and will not help complete one's taxes before April 18, 2011. The PK100 is capable of changing the way one listenings to music with it's highly refined minimalist feature set and simple operation. My tagline for this CA recommended player is, The Auraliti PK100 connect, select, and play.




     










    Product Information


    • Price - $799

    • Product Page - Linklink

    • Quick Installation Guide - (PDF)

    • Auraliti Simplified - (PDF)





    • Plays FLAC, WAV, AIFF, and MP3 music files

    • 44.1, 48, 88.2, 96, 176.4, and 192 KHz

    • Automatically selects for correct sample rate

    • Remote control from any web browser

    • Bit perfect, low jitter, and no resampling

    • SPDIF 75 ohm BNC digital

    • Internal Digital to Analog converter allows option of RCA output or*balanced*output*over TRS connectors


    Analog output: RCA stereo pair
    Optional Analog output: Balanced differential TRS connections
    Dimensions: 7.5 x 7.5 x 2.25 in; 190 x 190 x 55 mm
    Weight: 5 lbs, 2.27 Kg with power supply


     

     

     
    Comments 136 Comments
    1. 20hertz's Avatar
      20hertz -
      Chris,<br />
      So many words to explain the use of what is in reality a very simple and easily understood product.<br />
      <br />
      So FEW words to tell us what we want to know most, HOW DOES IT SOUND?<br />
      <br />
      PLEASE provide a better insight into the sonic performance, where it sits in relation to the products commonly used, Mac with Amarra,etc<br />
      <br />
      Thanx
    1. Lazenby's Avatar
      Lazenby -
      Forgot to add a (temporary?) downside:<br />
      <br />
      3. The user interface options for the PK100, as far as I am aware (and I have looked far and wide), do not lend themselves well to touchscreens, relative to a windows 7 / j river build (e.g., CAPS server), which seems a visual and tactile delight to use. It seems this is the case for two reasons: a) I have not come across a CURRENT mpd client that is designed with touchscreens in mind. b) Affordable touchscreens, like the Dell ST2220T, have no linux drivers. We may see these things change, given the open source nature of mpd... <br />
      <br />
      Ron
    1. Erwin S's Avatar
      Erwin S -
      Allow me to give my opinion as a Computer(1%)-Audiophile(111%)... The fact that the HD is external is a good option. The fact that one needs to phisically disconnect and move this HD close to a computer every time one wants to add music or fiddle with metadata is no advantage for my current set-up. And you mention some issues with metadata from AIFF. I can't see why this would be better or even as good as a similarly priced Mac mini with the same external HD attached. No NAS playback is a big flaw for such a device.
    1. Audio_ELF's Avatar
      Audio_ELF -
      Chris, (or anyone else) perhaps you could answer a couple of questions / queries...<br />
      <br />
      First off, the audio output (IIRC) is via a ESi Juli@ card. Apart from the "custom" connectors (BNC and twin RCA) is this an off the shelf Juli@ or has additional tweaking been applied?<br />
      <br />
      Second, if I was to use this with a DAC only supporting 24/96 will it downsample 24/192 files or will they just refuse to play?<br />
      <br />
      Finally, how does this compare with the Sonore players? Both are Linux based using MPd for playback so software they are similar (with additional functionality with the Sonore). Also, is there any prospect of you getting a Bryston BDP1 which would be interesting if Bryston bring anything (beyond a prettier case) to the party. <br />
      <br />
      Eloise
    1. Lazenby's Avatar
      Lazenby -
      <i>No NAS playback is a big flaw for such a device.</i><br />
      <br />
      Yes and no. Connection to a NAS is possible, but not any NAS will work. A purpose built NAS from Auraliti is(still?) on the way. <br />
      <br />
      I'll paste this response by Demian Martin from an older thread:<br />
      <br />
      "I'm happy to pass the details on making a server work with the auraliti players. I have a server 95% done (which I'm reminded repeatedly is 100% unfinished).<br />
      <br />
      To get a server working with the auraliti players it must support the following:<br />
      1) zeroconfig (aka Bonjour). This is the technology we use to get the boxes to find each other on the network.<br />
      2) nfs (network file system) is how the boxes communicate. Its a Unix technology well supported on all unix platforms (linux, Sun, OSX) but poorly supported on windows. It works really well for what we are doing.<br />
      <br />
      If those are both supported then the settings become important- the server's host name must be correct and the content directories must be exported. We have details on these settings somewhere and I can pass them to interested parties after I dig them up. I don't want to make a mistake here since the consequences will be lingering.<br />
      <br />
      I have looked at a number of commercial nas boxes for details but many are not clear on whether these are supported or if they can take specific settings."<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>I can't see why this would be better or even as good as a similarly priced Mac mini with the same external HD attached.</i><br />
      <br />
      From what I have read, a Mac mini is a noisy beast (in an electrical/RFI sense) compared to the Auraliti, and there are anecdotal reports that mpd running in the Auraliti hardware is preferable to itunes/Amarra etc.<br />
      <br />
      Ron
    1. Goopie's Avatar
      Goopie -
      I agree with a previous post that this review is long on words and very short on a description of its sound quality.<br />
      <br />
      $799 seems very expensive for such a simple device. Why would I buy an Auraliti PK100 over a Squeezebox Touch for $299? The Touch seems a more elegant solution than the Aurality.<br />
      <br />
    1. Wavelength's Avatar
      Wavelength -
      Chris,<br />
      <br />
      I am pretty sure Ray has released a version of the unit now with an additional USB card instead of the Juli for use with USB DACS. They sent me one a couple of months ago and have some of my product for which they are testing with.<br />
      <br />
      Thanks<br />
      Gordon
    1. Pale Rider's Avatar
      Pale Rider -
      But simplicity and purism do not by themselves get us to elegance. Requiring disconnection/reconnection/disconnection/reconnection for the simple process of updating the library will indeed—as Chris and others pointed out—make this a non-starter for many. It does for me.<br />
      <br />
      I would gladly replace my Mac mini in my office listening system with a device such as this, if we could solve the NAS access issue or the HD reconnection issue. Issues with metadata in AIFF are also irksome but addressable. <br />
      <br />
      Still, a promising sign of things to come.<br />
      <br />
      P.S. And like the others, I would also like to hear more about how it sounds.
    1. losingmyreligion's Avatar
      losingmyreligion -
      <br />
      <br />
      "External clocking is not a feature of the PK100 but I'm pretty positive nearly all PK100 users are thankful for this exclusion as an externally clocked card is quite cumbersome to operate."<br />
      <br />
      thanks Chris, I was wondering about this, as I'd prefer the option of clocking the PK100 (or the upcoming L1000) from my LIO-8.<br />
      <br />
      I have the question in to Demian on the L1000, since it would be connecting to my DAC via AES/EBU.<br />
      <br />
      clay<br />
      <br />
    1. davidada's Avatar
      davidada -
      I have been using the Auraliti for over one month, previously using Mac Mini and Pure Music or Amarra out to Wyred 4 sound Dac 2.<br />
      I liked the idea of a headless unit outputting bit perfect data.<br />
      I was able to AB the two systems easily as I had duplicate HD's, Iwent USB into the Wyred from the MAC and BNC from the Auraliti.<br />
      At first I was not happy with the results from the Auraliti it sounded flat and thin, I really wanted it to sound better and logically thought it must - I put the difference down to the Music software from the MAC.<br />
      Ray at Auraliti was happy to take the unit back although he to was confused by my discovery.<br />
      One night I decided to do a hard reset on the Wyred 4 sound dac and lo and behold everything changed - now the Auraliti was clearly the better sounding by a large margin. I can only assume I had the output set at different values for the DAC inputs.<br />
      I am extremely happy with the Auraliti and it would be even better with an Auraliti NAS attached.<br />
    1. Vade_Forrester's Avatar
      Vade_Forrester -
      The Auraliti PKUSB is listed as "coming soon" on the Auraliti web site. It should be an interesting product for those with a USB-only DAC.<br />
      <br />
      Vade Forrester
    1. Pale Rider's Avatar
      Pale Rider -
      David:<br />
      <br />
      Thanks for this comment. The W4S DACs are on my short list for my second system. I was under the impression the DAC requires proprietary drivers in order to function. Is that not the case?<br />
      <br />
      I would also be interested in your elaboration on "better sounding by a large margin" comment. Really? Please elaborate and describe. I am sure the PM/Amarra folks would find this interesting. Although primarily a Fidelia user, I also have a PM license, and since my Audiophilleo is telling me that I am delivering bit perfect source, I would be curious as to your thoughts on not only how the sound os better by a large margin, and your speculation as to the reason.<br />
      <br />
      Thanks!<br />
      <br />
      Greg
    1. Audio_ELF's Avatar
      Audio_ELF -
      Greg, yes the Wyred4Sound needs proprietary drives to use it via USB however if can also be used via SPDIF such as from the PK1000. <br />
      <br />
      It's doubtful if the Wyred4Sound DAC2 would be usable with a USB only version of the Auraliti. <br />
      <br />
      Eloise
    1. losingmyreligion's Avatar
      losingmyreligion -
      <br />
      Was the Mac Mini you compared against tweaked at all, or just as Steve Jobs intended?<br />
      <br />
      thx<br />
      clay<br />
    1. Pale Rider's Avatar
      Pale Rider -
      Thanks Eloise.
    1. Vade_Forrester's Avatar
      Vade_Forrester -
      Eloise, I'm curious why you think the DAC-2 wouldn't work with the USB version of the Auraliti. The DAC-2 has an excellent USB input which accepts music files up to 192 kHz sampling rate. As I understand the Auraliti's USB model, it has a USB output optimized for audio. You may even be able to turn of the USB power transmission. To my simple mind, the DAC-2 should work better with the Auraliti USB model than with most computers.<br />
      <br />
      Vade Forrester
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi Vade - The W4S DAC2 USB implementation requires special drivers that only exist for Mac OS X and Windows. Implementations such as Streamlength don't require such drivers.
    1. ted_b's Avatar
      ted_b -
      user has no Linux USB drivers for the DAC2, only Mac and PC. Since the W4S DAC requires proprietary drivers (unlike some other USB DACs), users would need EJ (Wyred co-founder) to write them a Linux one. However, my understanding is that Auraliti's next approach, USB, comes at a much different price point (i.e $3k-ish)..so something is clearly improved over just a USB port. My guess is a sophisticated power supply, for one.<br />
      <br />
      I am also very interested in reading DavidA's comparisons with Amarra/PM (Mac Mini) and with Chris's thoughts on the PK vs his other non-Pyramix listening (PM/Amarra/Mac Mini, JRiver/pc, etc). <br />
      <br />
      Wonder how long a 1TB USB drive takes to read and sort, and then when one adds a new album does one connect and re-estabish a whole new directory again?
    1. dummy's Avatar
      dummy -
      Is Streamlenght the only asynch/USB that doesn't require drivers? Even at 176/192? I thought drivers were always needed beyond 96khz. Or is It only with an asynch implementation (other than Streamlenght)?<br />
      <br />
      Thanks!
    1. manisandher's Avatar
      manisandher -
      <em>"I have the question in to Demian on the L1000, since it would be connecting to my DAC via AES/EBU."</em><br />
      <br />
      Clay, I'm really surprised that you're looking into using an AES/EBU connection (albeit one utilizing a separate wordclock). I thought you were a firewire die-hard. Also, what is it about using a Mac Mini that you think you can improve on with a L1000? Just interested...<br />
      <br />
      FWIW, I <em>love</em> the philosophy behind the L1000, and if it wasn't for the fact that the NOS1 needs an upsampling/upscaling player, I would certainly consider it.<br />
      <br />
      Mani.