• Halide Design Bridge Review

    In 2008 Devilsound Labs released its Digital Audio Cable. The idiot-proof USB to RCA DAC in-a-cable reviewed here on Computer Audiophile. Since the DAC’s release Devilsound Labs has changed its name to Halide Design and released The Bridge its new asynchronous USB to S/PDIF converter. The Bridge isn’t just another USB to S/PDIF device. Halide Design licensed Streamlength™ asynchronous USB code from Wavelength Audio to take this converter to another level. Not content to rely on Streamlength’s™ reputation as one of the best USB implementations available, Halide completed The Bridge with an innovative design in a very small package.


     

    Devilsound Horns Roots

    Over the last couple years I've talked to Jonathan and Aaron of Halide Design via email numerous times. Half of our conversations were about Halide Design products while the other half were about computer audio and the high end industry. After every conversation I always said to myself, "These guys are really cool, really smart, and have great potential in high end audio." There's a lot to like about the unjaded enthusiasm and ideals of Jonathan and Aaron. Never once have they talked about high margins and snake oil. It's really refreshing to hear their ideas about new high quality products at relatively reasonable prices. These guys are not in the business to separate people form their money. Jonathan and Aaron really have a passion for creating great sounding and innovative audio products.

    Jonathan and Aaron share many beliefs with the readers of Computer Audiophile. "Computer audio is here to stay, and at this point, can supply sound quality that matches or rivals the best audio devices out there. Computers can store all your music (lossless of course) and have moved from a novelty, to a convenience, to a central component of high resolution computer playback." Said Jonathan and Aaron.

    When Jonathan and Aaron first dipped their toes into designing commercial high end audio components, the company name Devilsound Labs seemed perfectly fine. At least it signified something different from the more traditional audio companies. According to Jonathan, "We wanted to make something for the "new generation" of audiophiles. Simple, small, easy to use, and relatively inexpensive. Thus was born the Devilsound DAC, our first product. The idea there was to take ideas that had been floating around in the audiophile world, such as non-oversampling on the D/A converter and high-quality interconnects, and add our own touches."

    The signature touches of Devilsound Labs products are good components, circuit design and layout, and compact size without sacrifice. In almost every audiophile endeavor shorter is better at keeping the audio path cleaner. During the design phase no opportunity is missed to make these paths shorter in the interest of better measurements and increased sonic accuracy.

    After the successful Devilsound DAC and a bit more experience under their belts Jonathan and Aaron decided to advance the company further with a new name and new product. They settled on Halide Design as the label to launch new products. It does sound much more professional and robust compared to the possibly juvenile Devilsound Labs.

     

    The Bridge

    Continuing with their signature design touches Jonathan and Aaron set out to make The Bridge USB to S/PDIF converter. They saw no need for the traditional S/PDIF output cable. Instead they aimed to clean the signal path by using what they call an "Active Interconnect" where the device is really a signal unit. "The advantage of eliminating unnecessary components is that it leads to reducing other unnecessary components. So for instance, since we don't need any sample rate converter or other bulky devices to clean up jitter, this saves board space, and makes it possible to build the device small enough to eliminate the cable as well." Said Jonathan.

    Short clean signal paths are not the only innovative design elements in The Bridge. Without a separate power supply The Bridge receives power via a USB port. Five volt power emanating from the less than satisfactory switching power supply of a computer is the last thing an audiophile wants feeding his components. To the layman it may appear there is no room in The Bridge's small CNC milled anodized aluminum frame to address this dirty power issue. Audiophiles are used to enormous linear power supplies, exotic power cords, and numerous power related products. I'm certainly guilty of running a separate power sub-panel to my listening room with dedicated circuits for the components. All of this seems so far from what is possible in the tiny Bridge USB to S/PDIF converter / Active Interconnect.

     

    "In order to supply clean power to the on-board circuitry, the Bridge uses a combination of power supply filtering and an newly released power down regulator. Power coming into the device is first PI filtered (CLC), which gives a two-pole attenuation for noise above roughly 3 kHz. This works to eliminate high frequency noise, which down-regulators are typically not as good at rejecting. This filtered signal, which is slightly less to 5 V (due to resistive elements in the passive filter), is down regulated to 3.3 V for the digital electronics, and an separate 3 V line for the clocks. Note that down-regulators tend to be excellent at rejecting noise at DC and lower frequencies, the rejection ratio falls off at higher frequencies. The combination of an initial LC filter and a regulator with high PSRR (70 dB at 10 Hz, a reduction factor of over 3,000), ultralow noise regulator insure that the clocks and the digital circuitry can operate as accurately as possible."

    "In order to isolate the output from the (potentially noisy) computer ground, and to avoid the possibility of ground loop noise, SPDIF commonly employs an output transformer. We use a small, high-quality output transformer, which allows excellent isolation and signal integrity in a small package." - Halide Design

     

    Removing unneeded internal circuitry and improving The Bridge's use of dirty computer power were two critical first steps. Getting to the next level of performance required the use of an asynchronous USB implementation. Not to be confused with Asynchronous Sample Rate Conversion (ASRC). Jonathan and Aaron were not satisfied with the existing adaptive USB or off the shelf implementations found in most USB audio devices. These guys look at everything from an engineering viewpoint as well as an audiophile sound quality viewpoint. Using either perspective it's easy to see or hear the advantages of an asynchronous design. (See Asynchronicity USB Primer here on CA for additional information). Halide Design didn't settle for just any asynchronous design as The Bridge needed to be completely plug n' play without additional device drivers to achieve the "Active Interconnect" concept.

    Jonathan and Aaron contacted Gordon Rankin of Wavelength Audio who developed Streamlength™ asynchronous USB code and licenses it to a limited number of high end audio manufacturers. Based on my conversations with Gordon it's evident he likes Jonathan and Aaron and thinks these guys have great potential as well. It should be noted that Gordon doesn't license his code to just anyone. Fortunately Halide Design was able to acquire the Streamlength™ license from Gordon and implement this asynchronous USB code in The Bridge.

    The Bridge ships with a captive six foot USB cable that is capable of being extended with a standard USB extender or a much better optical USB extension and isolation device. The six foot cable length is a bit short for my system as I house my music servers outside my listening room. I typically use three meter USB cables that passthrough a port in the wall from my music servers to my audio components. Without a USB extender readily available during this review period I moved my C.A.P.S. silent music server next to my Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC. This eliminated the need for a longer USB cable but was a little inconvenient. The Bridge truly is plug n' play without the need to install any software of drivers. It supports bit transparent digital audio output at 44.1, 48, 88.2, and 96 kHz. The Bridge is available with Eichmann RCA or standard 75 ohm BNC terminations. During the review I used the BNC version connected directly to the BNC input of my Alpha DAC. Both versions are cryogenically treated and have a fully isolated output using a high quality digital audio transformer.

     



     

    The Bridge To Sonic Bliss?

    Simply put, I was surprised by the high performance of The Bridge. I had an inkling The Bridge would be good based on its designers and the Streamlength™ USB code, but I didn't expect it would be this good. Playing all types of music The Bridge offered wonderful separation of the instruments and a clarity from top to bottom that was close to my Lynx AES16 PCI card. During the review I purchased Reference Recording's Crown Imperial by the Dallas Wind Symphony from HDtracks at 24 bit / 96 kHz. I own the HRx version at 24 bit / 176.4 kHz but The Bridge does not support sample rates above 96 kHz. Track eight on this album, Michael Daugherty's Niagara Falls, has become one of my favorites as a civilian and as a reviewer. Listening to Niagara Falls through The Bridge seemed to open another complete octave at the top end compared to other USB to S/PDIF devices I have used. The resolution and extension was so good I contacted a couple colleagues in the industry to discuss why I wasn't getting this level of performance from other converters. Specifically the M2Tech hiFace. My comparison between the hiFace and The Bridge was not a scientifically thorough longitudinal study conducted under controlled conditions. I have many hours of listening left before writing the complete hiFace review. It's entirely possible I'll be able to squeeze improved performance out of the hiFace in the coming days and weeks. As of now The Bridge is definitely my go-to USB to S/PDIF converter even if it is limited to 24/96 and below.

    Another clear sign of The Bridge's great performance can be seen through my listening habits during the review period. When I first placed The Bridge in my system I had the urge to listen to tons of music just to hear what it sounded like through The Bridge. I listened to a minute or two of what felt like hundreds of tracks. After twenty-four hours of this kid-like listening style I fell into complete album mode. I listened to whole albums one after the other. In the case of Shelby Lynne's new album Tears, Lies, and Alibis I listened to the same album three times in a row all the way through. This type of listening does not happen with every component and especially new components I'm not accustomed to hearing in my system. Sure the extremely low jitter specs of The Bridge play a role in its performance, but it's much easier for me to judge performance when my listening habits are altered by a component. I have other audio components here that can't hold my attention more than one or two minutes. The music through these components is simply inaccurate and unappealing causing my brain to tune out.

    During my last listening session with The Bridge I played the Anthony Wilson Trio's Jack of Hearts. This is a terrific album musically and sonically. I often play this album to hear how accurately components can reproduce drums and cymbals. On many mainstream recordings drums sound like someone is striking a piece of paper with a stick. This can make sonic quality judgments nearly impossible. Not so with Jack of Hearts. As far as I could tell The Bridge reproduced this recording with great accuracy. The drums sounded very good with space around them, appropriate reverb trials, and sharp transients. I'd have to ask Audioquest's Joe Harley for a 100% accuracy check as he was involved in the production of this fine album. Again, The Bridge performed great and was a pleasure to have in my system.

    Throughout the review I used J River Media Center v14 and v15 with WASAPI output. I was able to achieve bit transparent output without jumping through any hoops. I used the C.A.P.S. server running 32-bit Windows 7 Ultimate edition.

     

    C.A.S.H. Worthy

    The Halide Design Bridge asynchronous USB to S/PDIF converter has earned a well deserved spot on the Computer Audiophile Suggested Hardware List (C.A.S.H. List). This simple, small, single cable solution incorporates innovative design and the current holy grail of USB implementations asynchronous transfer mode, not to be confused with Asynchronous Sample Rate Conversion or ASRC. There are some fabulous DACs around without USB or FireWire input that will benefit greatly from the Halide Design Bridge. The Bridge enables audiophiles to use these existing DACs with almost any computer audio system available today. At $450 The Bridge is a relatively inexpensive component with great potential to bring any audio system into the future of high end audio reproduction. I highly recommend The Bridge from Halide Design to colleagues and Computer Audiophile readers around the globe.


     

     






    Product Information

    • Price - $450

    • The Bridge Product Page - Link

    • Product Design Details - Link

    • Halide Design Store - Link



     

    Associate Equipment:

    Verity Audio Fidelio loudspeakers, McIntosh MC275 amplification, Richard Gray's Power Company High Tension Wires, Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC, Wavelength Audio Proton, Ayre AX-7e Integrated Amp, C.A.P.S. server, Bel Canto USB Link, Halide Design Bridge, dCS Debussy DAC, dCS Puccini U-Clock, Kimber USB Cu, Kimber USB Ag, Benchmark DAC1 PRE, Kimber Select KS1011 Analog Cables, Kimber Select KS2020 Digital Cable, Kimber Monocle X Loudspeaker Cable, ASUS Xonar HDAV 1.3 Slim, Apple iPad, Sonic Studio's Amarra, M2Tech hiFace, Weiss Engineering DAC202, Lynx Studio AES16 Digital I/O Card.

     

     

     

     
    Comments 139 Comments
    1. bryan0101's Avatar
      bryan0101 -
      I wonder how this simple implementation would be against the highend non-asyn bridge like the bel canto USB link. Would love to see a comparison.
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi Bryan - The Bridge sounded much better than the USB Link in my system.
    1. all300b's Avatar
      all300b -
      Agreed that these asynch solutions should in theory sound BETTER than the (non-asynch) Lynx- wonder what is going on.<br />
      A more comprehensive comparison of how this and the Lynx SOUND different might help.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
    1. bryan0101's Avatar
      bryan0101 -
      Thank you Chris. <br />
      <br />
      Of course you have a bel canto lying around in your tool box under the sink for testing...(^_^) . Still, if Halide is perform on par with Lynx, what about the Asus Xonar with the latest driver in win7 doing bit-perfect? We never have a onboard cards....no...pure digital transports battle royale (no Dac function). That'd be awesome.
    1. blueixus's Avatar
      blueixus -
      Thank you Chris for the revue of the Halide Bridge. Frustratingly I have no doubt it will difficult to 'trial' here in Coalition UK.<br />
      <br />
      Surely the acid test will be how it performs against it's European rival the M2Tech Hiface and it's soon to be released (I hope) brother the EVO version - which I would guess would be at a very similar price point. <br />
      <br />
      This USB to SPIDF conversion is an ever burgeoning market which is good news for us stubborn legacy DAC owners and importantly reduces the price entry point to decent computer audiophilia.<br />
      <br />
      Is the M2Tech review coming soon?
    1. Part-Time Audiophile's Avatar
      Part-Time Audiophile -
      I have to wonder why it's getting an endorsement? Not to snipe or question your methods or metrics, or even the value or performance of the product, but as a strict question of methodology, if you're looking at a product in a given price point then wouldn't it make sense to set the bar at your standard? That is, when judging whether or not to classify a given product as a "superior/recommend product", shouldn't it have to actually provide performance equal to or better than the standard at that price point (in this case, the Lynx)? Better products that also happened to be more expensive could then be used to establish a new standard for that higher price point. Likewise for less expensive (and lower performing) products. Products that compete above their price category can be listed as such, or labeled as a "best buy" or something -- or simply set a new standard. <br />
      <br />
      Just a thought.<br />
      <br />
      But at the risk of being labeled a fanboi, I have to say that my experience with the ART Legato has proved to provide <i>superior</i> sound to a Lynx -- and the Legato competes in the $500 price point also. <br />
      <br />
      Just sayin'.<br />
      <br />
      ;-)
    1. Sasaki's Avatar
      Sasaki -
      Thank you for the review. This is fairly interesting.<br />
      I have tried their Devil Dac and I felt the dac-cable sounded very decent for the size. I think their products looks simple but sounds serious.<br />
    1. labjr's Avatar
      labjr -
      Seems kind of late in the game for new products which are limted to 2x sampling rates.
    1. bryan0101's Avatar
      bryan0101 -
      On another note. Would love to see a comparison of top asyn-USB converters vs squeezebox touch/transporter. Those squeezeboxes are rather short in it signal path: basically a custom OS, extract out the FLAC digits straight into digital-out (down-sample into 24/96 if 24/192, which is comparable...), pretty decent clock crystal. Wonder which setup win.
    1. kamil's Avatar
      kamil -
      Chris,<br />
      Hiface has 24/192 and the Bridge hasn't but is twice the price... but may be it makes up in sound quality. So when you compare the two, it would be interesting to know if the Hiface at 24/192 (or 24/176 for that matter) sounds better or worse than the bridge at 24/96 on the same recording.
    1. digger945's Avatar
      digger945 -
      WoW. What would it take for you to do this full time Chris?<br />
      Thanks a bunch.
    1. idiot_savant's Avatar
      idiot_savant -
      will NOT magically make your DAC async - the DAC clock <strong>still</strong> has to slave to the SPDIF. Now, the SPDIF coming out of an async device will have less jitter than an adaptive one, but the fundamental issues of SPDIF are not resolved by just coming out of a different box. In this case, I expect the SPDIF coming out the Lynx is already pretty good, but you obviously can't fit a Lynx to e.g. a Mac Mini, iMac, laptop, netbook, iPad etc.<br />
      <br />
      There are solutions where the PC interface <strong>can</strong> be in a different box, and avoid the SPDIF issues - on another thread is a scenario with a Weiss DAC acting as a master to an AF11, and I think dCS and Wadia offer similar options, but in all these cases the DAC has to have been designed to operate in this way.<br />
      <br />
      your friendly neighbourhood idiot
    1. Andrew S.'s Avatar
      Andrew S. -
      "Would love to see a comparison of top asyn-USB converters vs squeezebox touch/transporter."<br />
      <br />
      I've compared the HiFace(rca) to the TP, Touch and a modded SB3 (pulse transformer mod)all feeding an Ergo (which is very jitter and noise sensitive).<br />
      HiFace was much a tad better than the Touch and modded SB3, TP was better again.<br />
      The Ergo is a fairly average dac but comes into its own with the dsp. <br />
      I'm interested in the Bridge as a product because no driver is needed - so can use with linux and mpd...
    1. jonmarsh's Avatar
      jonmarsh -
      Good review, includes the kind of comparisons that should make it easy to frame where this fits in the overall scheme of things for relative performance. <br />
      <br />
      Obviously, excellent performance considering the price. <br />
      <br />
      Those wondering why the Lynx might be a skosh better in sonics should remember that the Lynx has a lot of board space for oscillators, regulators, and the like, and is inherently asynchronous, too- both are generating local oscillators and creating the data + clock signal. S/PDIF certainly has an advantage in a well implemented example for characteristic impedance quality, but it is with much lower signal levels- the pro level AES EBU has much higher drive levels, and for the balanced signal timing is derived from the zero crossings. <br />
      <br />
      The ultimate asynchronous implementation is right to a DAC local oscillator, not to an S/PDIF transmitter- Charles Hansen would probably look at the latter as something of heresy, for example! (I've known him since the late 70's, so it's probably safe for me to make that qualified statement). <br />
      <br />
      Thanks for the review- it's good to have another interface product to recommend that has some high res capabilities. Unfortunate, perhaps, that I have so much 176 kHz material. Most folks don't, though. For them, with an existing DAC like the Bryston, this could be a slam dunk.
    1. aljordan's Avatar
      aljordan -
      idiot_savant wrote<i>There are solutions where the PC interface can be in a different box, and avoid the SPDIF issues - on another thread is a scenario with a Weiss DAC acting as a master to an AF11, and I think dCS and Wadia offer similar options, but in all these cases the DAC has to have been designed to operate in this way.</i><br />
      <br />
      I use a Prism Orpheus. It sounds very good via its firewire connection to the PC. It sounds less good when a Lynx card is supplying the stream via SPDIF and the Orpheus is clocking from the SPDIF stream. However, it also sounds very good when the Orpheus is set as the master, and the Lynx is slaved to the Orpheus via a word clock, although it is less convenient because one has to manually change sampling rates when the file rate changes. Is this latter configuration similar to what you are referring to quoted above? Does the clock signal in the SPDIF stream just get ignored in this case?<br />
      <br />
      Thanks,<br />
      Alan
    1. idiot_savant's Avatar
      idiot_savant -
      If it's in master mode - there's nothing wrong with SPDIF as a mechanism for transferring data from A to B, it's the embedded clock that can be problematic, and the DAC having to recover it's clock from an external source that is non-perfect.<br />
      <br />
      This arrangement should be pretty close to ideal ( assuming the internal clocks of the prism are done properly ), although as you have pointed out the drawback is in changing the clock out from the DAC to suit the sample rate...<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      your friendly neighbourhood idiot
    1. blindjim's Avatar
      blindjim -
      <br />
      Thanks Chris. Nice review. Interesting for sure.<br />
      <br />
      I'm definitely looking forward to hearing about how the over all run off between the M2Tech hiface & the well more than double the price 'Bridge' comes out.<br />
      <br />
      If other likewise entrants to the USB > SPDIF race are on hand, those better or lesser assessments by comparison, would make for fun reading too!<br />
      <br />
      That is all it is too… fun reading. Until of course it’s in our own hot little hands and plugged into our supposed best outfits, it remains simple speculation… and fun to read about… and wonder about … etc. this pertinent and ongoing caveat needs more illumination to be sure. Ears, systems, tastes, rooms, and budgets vary a great deal. RWV<br />
      <br />
      I doubt however that contest will be fair, but it'll sure be interesting. I find all too often and especially as of late, 'price' seems the dictator of performance.... even if the performance or versatility of it is either marginalized, or reduced. The 'Bridge = 24/96' v the 'Hiface 24/192'. One for $450, another at $180.<br />
      <br />
      I'd submit as well, perhaps, the Fubar app be used for playback during listening comparisons. it would sure be as fair a path again. JR MC 14/15 = $49.95, & Fubar = free.<br />
      <br />
      I throw that in as I've found the KS aspect of the Hiface (in the context of my system) sounded better using Fubar 1.0.2.1, than it did using JR MC 15 using the same file types & modality as the KS in Fubar.... with only focus on the sound in mind of course. Media Center affords one an easier and more flexible player.<br />
      <br />
      I mean after all, if we seek an optimized purity in the sound we listen to or perhaps better still a higher degree of reality from those recordings which allow for such things, then the chain itself front to back are all on the stand for their integrity and contributions to the end product. The converter (in this case, sans additional clocks), the cable interface, the DAC, and naturally the associated system which reveals those changes.<br />
      <br />
      Value too is an integral factor for many and can’t be overlooked. It’s all too often associated with just the modestly to mid priced contestants though.<br />
      <br />
      Much of the chain itself see’s little light in many such articles. Any number of those chains are also, not the norm or even median of many of the systems out there.<br />
      <br />
      Consequently, a notation as to how a device may yield better or lesser results in “unlike listening arrangements vary quite often’’, gets sidestepped frequently, and the promoted or described item is given the spotlight for it’s particular prowess in a unique systems parameters. This always leaves speculation foremost in the minds of the more stayed yet immensely curious, and severely whets the appetite for the ‘current fad, fav, or flavor of the month’ crowd. <br />
      <br />
      Ala your assessment on the querry of better, between the Bridge and the BC converter, choosing the Bridge over it by saying, “I liked it better” without any further insight as to why.<br />
      <br />
      Beats me which is better, and I don’t know why one was picked over the other at this point.<br />
      <br />
      Personally, I’d prefer to hear how a ‘thing’ positively or negatively affects the sound, it’s advantages and it’s shortcomings, when it receives no aid downstream from appliances that access the digital clock by further amending it.<br />
      <br />
      Simple is best and I do feel plug and play devices are geared for and will be used by just such devotees, in more minimally configured outfits on a stand alone basis. I believe it would also gain for anyone of that ilk, a more transparent window to the items actual promise and reduce the inherent mind numbing debate that goes on within as to it’s possible or then, may be, probable purchase from a greater range of buyers enthusiastic about computer audio.<br />
      <br />
      Definitely so if they remain in the under $500 camp.<br />
      <br />
      As In the case of al these USB converters or sound cards: <br />
      EX. PC or Mac + new whiz bang gizmo + DAC (on at least a couple levels, <$3K, > $3K) + system, and be done with it.<br />
      <br />
      If a downstream device is added to or removed from, those notes should be included as to effects on performance, cost, and implementation, of those added components.<br />
      <br />
      “Computer audio is here…” and many more people are indeed eyeing this adventure as more and more an appetizing avenue for musical enjoyment. Lessening or setting aside as many obstacles as can be done readily in the process of reciting a new gizmo’s attributes, is a very attractive and inspiring province. Expounding on those obvious and noteable or distinct differences from the one gizmo to it’s likewise competitor should always be included.<br />
      <br />
      Keep up the good work, can’t wait for the Hiface account & hopeful comparisons to the ‘Bridge’. Thanks!<br />
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi blindjim - Thank you very much for the well thought out comments. Much of what you say certainly rings true. <br />
      <br />
      Foobar sounds just as good as J River Media Center even though one is free and the other is $50. I prefer J River but many other readers prefer Foobar. No biggie. Price has nothing to do with my preference. Foobar is like a spreadsheet to me. I don't like looking at spreadsheets. I also haven't been impressed with the different skins for Foobar. Others love the skins. Also, J River support has been awesome. Fixes are applied very quick and new releases are published. <br />
      <br />
      I have no doubt I'll get the hiFace working much better than it's currently performing. I just need to put some time into it. At $180 it very well could be the bargain of the year. I hope so, but we'll see.
    1. Matias's Avatar
      Matias -
      How is a more expensive and better sounding piece of equipment better rated then a cheaper one and goes to CASH list? I totally agree: either it sounds better for the same price, and therefore is a better value; or it is cheaper for the same performance, having a better value again.<br />
      HiFace has an enourmous value, because it is cheap and sounds great. At least here with JRiver 15, exclusive WASAPI memory play and max pre-buffering.
    1. blindjim's Avatar
      blindjim -
      <br />
      Thanks Chris.<br />
      <br />
      I sure do get the esthetic of Fubar being lackluster and most pedestrian and no better. usually I don't view the player when I'm listening to music per se... just for navigating about.<br />
      <br />
      Actually the good looks department of any soft player seems arbitrary to me given the intended purpose of them... colating, filing, categorizing, and selection. Once playlists are formulated in any player and one overcomes the ADHD syndrome predisposed onto the end user as the result of 'selection freedoms', ‘clickitis, and they’re ease of access and egress, it's a simple matter to click once and kick back twice. <br />
      <br />
      Softwars<br />
      <br />
      I get in fact two varied presentations between each player, Fu & JR MC14. Briefly I opted for MC 15beta for it's KS abilities in conjunction w/hiface. Now that disparity looms larger as I've opted not to migrate again to the full release of MC15. So it's Any of a few ASIO + M2Tech w/MC14, and KS w/Fubar 1021 for me... for a while I suspect.<br />
      <br />
      I'm adding a Oyaide T510 BNC cable to a BNC version of the Hiface tomorrow. Hope that will show as a step up from the XV2 presently in house, and formerly used on the RCA Hiface I had on loan.<br />
      <br />
      The greatest area for my curiosity lays between the sonics of the Lynx AES16PCI eXpress card as an interface and these other converters like the Bridge, Hiface, BC link, etc. Although without that input, as it may be, the loaned RCA Hiface was astonishing, given it's price to performance rating in my estimation! Truth be told, despite the no brainer cost, and thinking only of the improved sonic pallet,I find it an exceptional vivid and clear window to the performance, while remaining well heeled and engaging..<br />
      <br />
      “The King is dead, long live the King.”<br />
      <br />
      I continue to feel that is the key with any of these 'reachable' (< $1K; with less costly ones being substantially more attractive of course) interfaces... the value represented by such a ratio lives solely in the context and subjective constraints of the be-owner.<br />
      <br />
      Ascertaining that product, whatever it may wind up being, which places the enthusiast squarely on the threshold of diminishing returns, or well into it’s cavernous domain n ought to be the keynote item to which other hardware ought be marked against….. until itself is supplanted by some other whiz bang outta sight comparably priced digital streaming or converting ‘young gun’. <br />
      <br />
      All the while with musical purity the aim, and value, as sure considerations.<br />
      <br />
      <br />