• Hello DroboPro

    If 8 Terabytes is not enough for your music collection you'll be happy to know Data Robotics has just introduced the DroboPro. It has a 16 TB capacity, USB 2.0, FireWire 800, and iSCSI interfaces. The DroboPro uses BeyondRAID technology and can use a multitude of different disk sizes in a single enclosure. New to the Drobo lineup is the iSCSI capability. This enables connecting to the DroboPro over a standard computer network. iSCSI is similar to Network Attached Storage (NAS) in that it allows disk access via a network connection, but that's were the similarities end. Connecting via iSCSI is a little trickier and has more limitations than a standard NAS unit, but the benefits are plenty. I like iSCSI because the external/network drive mounts automatically upon boot-up and appears like a directly connected disk. This allows the user to format the disk and view the disk in Disk Utility or Disk Administrator, etc... It's not clear if the standard DroboShare is compatible with the DroboPro at this time. Read more for some close-up photos.


     

     

     

    More info available on the DroboPro web page.
    Retails price of DroboPro unit without any disk is $1299

     

    DroboPro Front
    DroboPro
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    DroboPro Angle
    DroboPro
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    DroboPro Internal
    DroboPro
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    DroboPro Rackmount
    DroboPro
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    DroboPro Rear
    DroboPro
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    Comments 4 Comments
    1. BEEMB's Avatar
      BEEMB -
      16TB !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!
    1. fuma's Avatar
      fuma -
      just say no to virtual filesystem layers!
    1. Gephory's Avatar
      Gephory -
      USB would be a CPU problem, but Firewire for direct attached server storage is actually not that bad. I use it on a FreeBSD server for a couple small zfs pools and it does fine <a href="http://www.sure-braindumps.com/642-453.htm">642-453 dumps</a>. A decent firewire chipset supports the full compliment of SCSI command including command queueing which is the most important feature for multiuser access. IO is good enough to completely saturate firewire 800 and read latencies with random IO aren't any worse than with SCSI at that speed <a href="http://www.sure-braindumps.com/642-481.htm">642-481 dumps</a>.<br />
      <br />
      Still, I'd be hard pressed to call this product "pro" -- the rackmount configuration is a joke and the performance is lackluster <a href="http://www.sure-braindumps.com/642-504.htm">642-504 dumps</a>. The lack of a redundant power option and redundant network ports is also dissapointing. I'd suggest that it's an attractive option in its price range though as most of the other products at this kind of price point are even worse performers.
    1. pwhinson's Avatar
      pwhinson -
      I must say that rackmount looks pretty goofy to me. I was tempted by the Pro model only because the premium you pay for larger drives. Right now anything over 1 terabyte is not cheap. That will forever be the case in increasing increments. Of course one of the advantages of the Drobo over other similar solutions is that you can mix drive capacities/sizes and the system reconfigures itself. So presumably since I purchased the standard Drobo and three 1TB drives, I could throw a 2TB in the fourth drive or something even larger - a gazillion terabytes??? - and have as much storage as I'll need in this lifetime. As long a two drives don't fail at the same time. <br />
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