• Audiophile Reference Music Server For A Song

    It all started with a little post via the Computer Audiophile Twitter page. "Working on arguably the best computer based audio solution available. It is so inexpensive you won't believe it!" Since that original hint was dropped I've received countless emails and posts through the CA forum asking about this system. I've delayed publishing an article about this very inexpensive system because I wanted to be absolutely certain it could perform with the best systems available. Right now I am absolutely certain this system is capable of matching or exceeding the sound quality from any system I've ever heard, hard disk or compact disc based. The time has come to reveal the music server that's capable of reference quality sound for less than $1,040.
     

     


    Setting Expectations

    Based on emails and conversations with readers I've concluded that the expectations of readers are all over the board. Some are expecting a complete system from power cable to listening chair yet others have zero expectations and don't get what the fuss is all about. Fortunately the vast majority of readers are somewhere in the middle of these two extremes. The system I am about to describe is nothing new to many people and there are no secrets here. Why am I so enthusiastic about this whole thing? Because the vast majority of readers don't know where to start with when it comes to integrating a music server in to their high-end system. Many audiophiles are already hesitant enough about getting into the music server game. When they see the price tag of a Mac Pro with 10 GB of RAM and eight CPU cores these people cry foul because computer based audio is supposed to be so much cheaper than traditional high-end components. Another factor in my enthusiasm is the world economy. It's terrible right now and people are looking for the best value they can find. Value is a relative concept, but I think we can all agree this system is a tremendous value. Possibly the most exciting part of this project is that a true reference quality source is now within the grasp of "everyday" audiophiles.

     


    The Beginning

    I've known about the possibility of obtaining fabulous sound from a Windows XP based music server for a long time. Many people have been doing this for several years. Until now I was not convinced this was a viable path. The XP operating system is on life support and using a legacy driver and firmware for the Lynx hardware goes against my grain. Sure the legacy driver and firmware may sound better but what happens when an upgrade is required because of some incompatibility with the operating system or a music playback application? What happens when Windows XP cannot be found through any legal channels? What about the bit perfect playback issues and bypassing the KMixer? What about blowing tweeters? My list of reasons for not supporting this platform go on and on. The fact that Mac OS X & iTunes is bit perfect right out of th box does not help Windows XP one bit. With all these strikes against a Windows based system it was hard to keep an open mind. I even ran XP on my MacBook Pro and Mac Pro machines in an effort to get the best sound quality out of Windows just like some colleagues had been doing for quite some time. It wasn't until a friend of mine in Northern California recently went through some very thorough listening tests, with some of the most resolving components available today, that I started to take XP seriously. This friend of mine listened to Windows and Mac based systems and concluded his Windows XP music server was the most resolving. Not only did this friend test each system, he had several very respected mastering engineers and component designers listen to each system. In fact one person who listened to these systems was a member of the band who actually played some of the music! So, I decided to put together an XP based music server that is readily available for purchase and is incredibly cheap by high-end audio standards. Before I could tell the world about such a great system I had to be absolutely sure that I agreed with my friend's findings.

     

    The System

    Dell Inspiron 530 $279
    Lynx AES16 card $700
    Lynx HD26 cable $60
    MediaMonkey $0
    Total $1,039

     


    The Details

    Dell Inspiron 530 - This Dell 530 is a very inexpensive system from a very reputable manufacturer. To get this low price you must order it with Windows Vista and use a copy of Windows XP that you already own. Otherwise Dell will charge $150 extra to pre-install Windows XP. This is one way to keep the price down. Another way is to use an existing computer you already have. If I were building a music server from scratch I would never have thought to use the components in this Dell 530. I've never been a fan of the Celeron processor and building a system around this chipset made me cringe in the past. Fortunately I took the chance and it paid off big time. The Dell 530 is a little larger than the 530s model because it can hold a full height PCI & PCIe card. The 530s is smaller and more attractive, but the half height PCI slot was a showstopper for me. Spec-wise this computer has nothing going for it. Slow memory, 320 GB hard drive, and a 10/100 Gb network card shouldn't impress anyone. The 530 is a noisier than my Mac Pro. This is likely the biggest drawback to the system. In my listening room the 530 sits in a breathable cabinet so the noise is dampened very well. It's certainly not a space shuttle gaming machine in terms of noise, but I know many audiophiles have dead silent listening rooms and may take offense to the noise from this Dell. I chose Windows XP as the operating system because, I hate to say this, it's proven to work as a reference music server operating system pretty well. A dedicated music server can operate well with XP and most Windows XP problems have been documented on the Internet numerous times. I installed Service Pack 3 and Internet Explorer 7, but stopped there. I didn't install any of the extras and removed several pieces of software that are automatically installed as part of Windows. You wouldn't install a telephone line on your CD transport, so I uninstalled Outlook Express and many items of similar uselessness. I also tweaked the operating system as far as I deemed necessary. I did all the usual things like empty the startup folders, browsing through MSConfig removing unneeded programs, and setting Windows up for best performance not the best graphical experience. I also painstakingly went through every service and determined whether or not it should start automatically, manually, or be disabled entirely. After configuring the Dell 530 BIOS and Windows XP operating system the computer now boots in about thirty seconds. That's pretty good for a Windows machine.

    Here is a link to the Dell page for the Inspiron 530. The base configuration is all you need! Dell Inspiron 530

     

    Lynx Studio AES16 PCI card & Breakout Cable - As long as my colleagues have been using Windows XP on their music servers they have been talking up the benefits of the Lynx AES16 card with legacy firmware and legacy drivers. This is another one of those things I had to see hear to believe. I can't think of another situation where I would select the PCI version of a component when a PCI Express version is available. Longevity, more speed, "better" engineering etc... usually favor the PCI Express version of a card. Not in this case. It has gone around pro audio circles for a little while now that the PCI version of the Lynx AES16 card "better." Since I already have the PCI Express AES16e version and the word on the street favored the PCI AES16 version I selected the PCI version. Not only is the PCI version of the Lynx card "better" than the PCIe version, the legacy firmware and legacy drivers are better. As I said earlier, I was hesitant and skeptical about this card and configuration. Keeping on my theme of readily available components and computers I selected the standard Lynx breakout cable (CBL-AES1604 Eight-channel HD26 to XLR AES I/O Cable for AES16). I do prefer my custom HD26 to XLR AES cable as it removes the unneeded "antennae" from the equation but decided against its inclusion as part of this system because it's not readily available yet. The firmware version I used with the AES16 card is Rev 22. I had to run an easy program that automatically downgraded the firmware from the current version to Rev 22. The driver I installed is the LynxTWO Version 1.30 Build 057g. I certainly have not listened to all the available versions of firmware and drivers for this card, but I trust highly respected friends and those with much more experience using this card. If I do find a better version I will be the first to let the CA readers know.

    Links to AES16 card and Lynx Cable

     







    MediaMonkey - MediaMonkey is my playback application of choice on Windows XP. Some people have identified sound quality "issues" with MediaMonkey, but I have yet to find a better sounding consumer friendly application. The MediaMonkey interface is pretty good, but has its pitfalls. I will say its much more usable than Foobar2000, but there are some newer Foobar2000 skins that many readers find very impressive. I installed the in_wave.dll add-on for AIFF support in MediaMonkey. The Output Plugin I use is wave_out.dll. This plugin allows simple selection of the Lynx AES card and an option to disable the MediaMonkey volume control. Configuration is pretty simple, but certainly not as easy as iTunes on a Mac in my opinion. My favorite part of MediaMonkey is the auto-sample rate recognition. This allows the listener to click between 16/44.1, 24/88.2, 24/176.4, and 24/192 files without changing anything or closing the application. Something Mac users are not accustomed to. It is really pleasant to switch between all these sample rates and still get bit perfect output every time. I did try several other playback applications including Winamp and JRiver Media Center but these applications struggled with the Reference Recordings HRx 24/176.4 WAV files. When one application can't playback the best recordings I've ever heard and another has trouble at all it's an easy decision to make. MediaMonkey wins hands down. I am aware of many fans of the other applications and many of them don't like the current selection of higher resolution music. For now there is nothing pushing them to another application. There are also pro audio based applications like WaveLab and Samplitude that some people prefer over any consumer based application. These apps may offer wonderful sound, but have no library management. The system I put together for this article is an all around reference quality system with library management and readily available components.

    Link to MediaMonkey

     

    Conclusions

    In anticipation of the first reader question I will attempt to proactively provide an answer. Am I switching from Mac to Windows XP? Not entirely. The user interface of iTunes and OS X, the simplicity and stability of the Apple platform, and to be honest the sound quality is fabulous. Not to mention my Mac systems may save me from blowing my tweeters. The same cannot be said for some MediaMonkey and Windows systems. Lately I've been all about my Dell Windows XP PC, Lynx AES16 card and MediaMonkey. I think the system has greater resolution than my current Mac music servers using OS X and iTunes. There is a certain "rightness" to the sound of this Dell based system. Drum attacks sound sharp and not rolled into, while the extension on the high notes is stupendous and incredibly resolving. But, the Mac does have a sound that's very pleasing and isn't fatiguing one bit. I think for many readers the choice between Mac or Windows in terms of sound quality will be based on personal preference. Some people like tubes while others like solid state. Some like electrostatics while others prefer horns. Now we can add an another one to the mix, some like OS X while others like Windows XP. Both the Mac OS X and Windows XP based systems are reference quality in my opinion. I would put either of these systems up against a physical transport / CD player any day of the week. Plus, the cost of this system is less than $1,040! Readers can use the DAC of their choice as long as it has an AES input. As you can probably guess I used my Berkeley Audio Design Alpha DAC for most of my listening sessions with the Dell based system. Combind the Alpha DAC and this system are right around $6,000. This combination can bypass a preamp and directly drive your amplifier(s). Many readers should be adding up the dolar savings in their heads right now. No preamp, no extra set of cables etc...

    As I said earlier, this system comprised of a Dell 530, Lynx AES16, Windows XP, and MediaMonkey is nothing new and is no secret formula. I personally know readers currently using very similar systems. What has me so excited is the cheap cost and high availability of the components I've put together in this article. Every single Computer Audiophile reader can now have a audiophile reference quality music server, that's as good or better than as anything else, for less than $1,040.

     


     

     
    Comments 132 Comments
    1. blessingx's Avatar
      blessingx -
      Interesting setup. I'd be curious how it stands up to what many seem to think is a leading $1K bang-for-buck solution of:<br />
      <br />
      Apple or PowerMax sold refurbished Mac mini ($500)<br />
      Apogee Duet ($500)<br />
      <br />
      Course both setups require some sort of display. <br />
      <br />
      May be a fun battle?
    1. VincentH's Avatar
      VincentH -
      Hi Chris, this is probably a question you get a lot, but I cannot think of an answer myself and I haven't read one either... so here goes:<br />
      <br />
      As far as I know there are two dimensions to music in the digital realm, if you consider a single channel: amplitude and timing.<br />
      <br />
      <ol><li>Sources with bit-perfect output should not be able to differ in amplitude.</li><br />
      <li>If you combine different bit-perfect sources with the same DAC that re-clocks the bitstream within the DAC, then the combined amplitude and timing should not be able to differ - at least not consistently (there are always 'random' external influences like equipment temperature etc).</li><br />
      <li>I'm assuming that stereo music playback (in the digital realm) on a bit-perfect source keeps the amplitude words of both channels permanently in-sync - so the first word of a song for the left channel arrives at the DAC together with the first word of the right channel, and so on right up to the last word of the song.</li> <br />
      </ol><br />
      <br />
      If you logically combine the above, it says "such music servers cannot differ sonically".<br />
      <br />
      Which leaves me with the question: how can there be consistently perceived sound differences between different bit-perfect sources, such as the music server you present here and other servers, when you use a good DAC that controls timing? Do you have an explanation? Is my understanding/assumption flawed?<br />
      <br />
      As you always say, in the end I just let my ears decide, but at some level I'm troubled if I feel that I am missing some fundamental understanding. Hope you can shed some light onto this.<br />
      <br />
      Thx, VincentH<br />
    1. wappinghigh's Avatar
      wappinghigh -
      Well put Vincent. This has also troubled me....just to follow on, if someone else on this forum has managed to get 24/192 out of the optical out of a MacPro (running Vista)...why would this be any worse in sound quality than 24/192 out of firewire (say into the "Amarra") solution.?<br />
      <br />
      Actually come to think of it as long as the output is "clocked" by a really good clock to minimize jitter, it shouldn't matter which computer/soundcard/output is used. <br />
      <br />
      Then ease of use of the software becomes paramount......
    1. Poo's Avatar
      Poo -
      Well... if it sounds as good as you say... I've got some expensive junk to sell! Guess there's one way to find out...
    1. shenzi's Avatar
      shenzi -
      Regardless of Mac vs PC and bit perfect debates, congratulations Chris for outlining a highly accessible system. <br />
      <br />
      I'm sure there are a lot of Windows users out there who will already have a PC of similar spec and may be using XP. When they come to upgrade for computing use, the idea that they can recycle their old machine into a reference quality music server is going to be very appealing. It will spread the computer audio message like wildfire.
    1. Lars's Avatar
      Lars -
      Chris,<br />
      <br />
      How did this reference system compare with the Amarra beta?
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi Guys - Thanks for the comments thus far.<br />
      <br />
      cfmsp - <i>"Chris, did you try the AES 16 running OS X?"</i><br />
      No, unfortunately the new Mac Pros don't have any PCI slots.<br />
      <br />
      VincentH - I wish I had a good answer for you but this one is out of my realm of expertise. I'd be doing a disservice if I claimed to have the answer here. I have some suspicions, but they are not fit to print just yet. It would be fabulous if all digital interfaces were the same. We could all get by with the cheapest optical output & Toslink cable available and the high-end would never be the same! People could actually afford to purchase all the music they want!<br />
      <br />
      Shenzi - Thanks for recognizing the value in this one :-)<br />
      <br />
      Lars - I'd love to comment but it wouldn't be fair to compare an unfinished product to production product. Good or bad the differences will likely change before Amarra is finally released.<br />
    1. BEEMB's Avatar
      BEEMB -
      <br />
      Vincent,<br />
      <br />
      Yes I agree. I'm using a far cheaper sound card, simply outputting a bit perfect optical stream from my sound card into the DAC within my ADM9.1's. They sound fabulous.<br />
      <br />
      I can't see how there is a difference between bit perfect from one card to another; I guess drivers have an impact but if you're bit perfect then surely you're bit perfect.<br />
      <br />
      Chris - just out of interest - how are you controlling this system ? A PC connected to a monitor ? Media Monkey is tought to control from your sofa - I try to but it's not ideal. Maybe there are some good skins out there that make this a little easier.<br />
      <br />
      I'm very interested in how you're controlling it.<br />
      <br />
      As for your server, I just knew it would be a combination of a cheap PC with enough processing power to media files and an expensive audio card. Great reading.<br />
      <br />
      Regards,<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      Matt.
    1. BEEMB's Avatar
      BEEMB -
      <br />
      In addition to my post above I just saw this on the Media Monkey webpage ... Control it using the iPhone ... <br />
      <br />
      http://www.mediamonkey.com/news/2008/11/05/new-mediamonkey-306-syncs-with-iphone-3g/<br />
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi beemb - I'm controlling it with my MacBook Air via Remote Desktop. I have iMonkey on my iPod Touch but it is far from a fully functional application.
    1. Mr.C's Avatar
      Mr.C -
      From what I've read up in forums, the difference between having an inexpensive high jitter interface, and an expensive low jitter interface is the difference between having to reconstruct the signal or potentially leaving the signal alone or not doing very much to it. I also read that high jitter signals reaching the dac can overload the circuits that reclock it, leaving more jitter than the dacs claim is left. It seems kind of like compression: low jitter doesn't need to be reconstructed (like uncompressed data), while high jitter needs reconstruction (like compressed data) which depends on the reclocking mechanism of the dac.<br />
      <br />
      Cavan
    1. Monk's Avatar
      Monk -
      What if your DAC has no AES inputs? (a la Benchmark DAC PRE).
    1. BobH's Avatar
      BobH -
      Great article and many thanks for your hard work!<br />
      <br />
      The main thing I was hoping for from the article, and indeed I got, was a clearer idea of how to approach the whole music server thing with regards to future upgrades. The Lynx card is quite expensive here in the UK - at £650 it is only £150 shy of the cost of a new PS Audio Digital Link III. But, provided the PC has a spare PCI slot then the Lynx can be added at a later date, if so desired. It also seems that, once again, AES is a clear winner of USB? So a DAC with usb inputs for now, and AES for later, would also be a good idea! At my price point, that's me sorted then<br />
      <br />
      Credit crunch anyone? Nah! - thought not!
    1. Wavelength's Avatar
      Wavelength -
      Chris,<br />
      <br />
      Common a dell... what you want this too work for like what a couple of weeks. Why not the L22 it works just as well and would save you some dimes...<br />
      <br />
      Thanks<br />
      Gordon
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi Gordon - I love the comments! This is the first Dell I've purchased in my life and I was really hesitant. Plus the internal components of this machine are nothing to write home about. As I said in the article, everything about this project goes against my grain. Fortunately I am extremely happy with the outcome.<br />
      <br />
      The L22 only supports 96k digital output and 192k analog output. The AES16 is worth the extra cost.
    1. Purite Audio's Avatar
      Purite Audio -
      Chris Hi, you already know my experience trying more or less this system, how does your Mac pro/ lynx/BAD compare to the dell/lynx /BAD the only difference is the OS/software ? Very Best keith.
    1. audiozorro's Avatar
      audiozorro -
      I have several comments/questions and I have to object on several fronts:<br />
      <br />
      1. The price – 1040 makes me think of taxes.<br />
      2. A computer based audio solution should be a replacement for a CD player. Your solution does not include a DAC for $1,040. Your reference DAC makes this a $6K solution.<br />
      3. A noisy computer has no place in audio. Aside from the obvious listening room objections, noticeable noise or vibrations in components rarely improve the sonic qualities of music. Definitely cannot be considered reference quality.<br />
      4. The cost of the Windows XP software is not included – foul.<br />
      5. Aged software and firmware obsolescence? Are software and firmware upgrades reversible in case users try different versions to improve audio quality over the next, say 5 years? <br />
      6. Are the inexpensive upgrades for memory (+$75 for 4GB) or hard disk storage (+$50 for 500GB) not worth the money?<br />
      7. Possibility of blown tweeters? – deserves a strong warning to proceed at your own risk unless your in the speaker business.<br />
      8. Antenna breakout cables? – I believe your HD26 to XLR AES/EBU Cable Update bears repeating - a better cable is highly desirable.<br />
      9. A better computer power supply, better power cord and vibration control should improve audio playback.<br />
      <br />
      Chris, thanks for trying. Of course the heart (and cost) of what you are recommending is the Lynx Studio AES16 PCI card from your CASH List. But how does it compare to the AES16e card? I feel that a detailed commentary from you is fair game since both cards are from the same manufacturer and I thought identical in price.<br />
      <br />
      As suggested by ‘blessingx’, the Mac mini and Apogee Duet is probably a more cost effective solution if you don’t mind the 24/96 limits of the Duet.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi audiozorro - I do hear your concerns but don't share in your cynicism. To be honest your post left a real sour taste in my mouth. Of course I respect your honesty as you no doubt will respect mine.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      I believe I more or less touched on several of your concerns, but I will address them here as well. <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"1. The price – 1040 makes me think of taxes."</i><br />
      <br />
      To be honest the price makes me think of a great way to get into the music server game with a true reference transport for less money than it takes to walk into a high-end store. There is no way I can include taxes in this system because we have readers from 165 different countries and all 50 states of the US which each have different or no sales taxes. There are very few items for sale that include the tax as part of the description. If the 1040 makes you think of 1040 EZ I can't help you there and many of our readers will be lost on that one as well.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"2. A computer based audio solution should be a replacement for a CD player. Your solution does not include a DAC for $1,040. Your reference DAC makes this a $6K solution."</i><br />
      <br />
      Your definition of computer based solution appears to be fixed and must include all components to replace a CD player. I don't agree that there is a fixed definition of computer based audio solution and I addressed some of this concern in my Setting Expectations section. I also mentioned, "...Combined the Alpha DAC and this system are right around $6,000." I could have published the article including the Alpha DAC and still be very excited about the low cost of great sound. I chose to leave the DAC choice up to each listener. Most of our readers are much more familiar with DACs than they are with computers.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"3. A noisy computer has no place in audio. Aside from the obvious listening room objections, noticeable noise or vibrations in components rarely improve the sonic qualities of music. Definitely cannot be considered reference quality."</i><br />
      <br />
      The sound of this system is 100% reference quality. Noisy is a subjective term and many readers have their own ways of dealing with this. In addition I easily could have included the totally fanless system I just built based ona Zalman TNN300 case, but that would increase the price by about $600. There certainly are pitfalls with the system in this article and I was straight forward in mentioning them. I really recommend you give this system a listen before taking a guess that the sound is not reference quality. The people I briefly spoke about in this article, mastering engineers, component designers, band members, etc ..., all think this system is reference quality. None of them has any vested interest in any computer platform. The systems used for listening tests comprised TAD M1 and Magico loudspeakers with the highest of the high-end performing components to power these speakers. <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"4. The cost of the Windows XP software is not included – foul."</i><br />
      <br />
      This was addressed very early in the article. In fact one reader who has already posted a comment suggests people will use a PC they already have and avoid purchasing this license. Since I had a copy and it is pretty likely there are legal avenues to avoid purchasing this license I think it's fair to exclude this from the price.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"5. Aged software and firmware obsolescence? Are software and firmware upgrades reversible in case users try different versions to improve audio quality over the next, say 5 years?"</i><br />
      <br />
      I also expressed my concern in the article for legacy drivers and firmware and gave many valid reasons for this concern. Fortunately a music server to a certain extent can be frozen in time in terms of upgrades. Plus, the software and firmware are up and down-gradable. As I wrote in the article, "...I had to run an easy program that automatically downgraded the firmware from the current version to Rev 22."<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"6. Are the inexpensive upgrades for memory (+$75 for 4GB) or hard disk storage (+$50 for 500GB) not worth the money?"</i><br />
      <br />
      That's a personal decision. Worth the money is very subjective. I did not try any of the offered upgrades with this system so I can't say what the effect would have been. I can say my machine has performed flawless thus far.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"7. Possibility of blown tweeters? – deserves a strong warning to proceed at your own risk unless your in the speaker business."</i><br />
      <br />
      Most certainly and is one of the reasons I listed for my hesitancy with this project. Using this system as purely a music server and not attempting to change settings or track names etc... will go a long way towards keeping your tweeters safe. It was worth the risk in my opinion. <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"8. Antenna breakout cables? – I believe your HD26 to XLR AES/EBU Cable Update bears repeating - a better cable is highly desirable."</i><br />
      <br />
      Most certainly. As I said in the article, "...Keeping on my theme of readily available components and computers I selected the standard Lynx breakout cable (CBL-AES1604 Eight-channel HD26 to XLR AES I/O Cable for AES16). I do prefer my custom HD26 to XLR AES cable as it removes the unneeded "antennae" from the equation but decided against its inclusion as part of this system because it's not readily available yet..."<br />
      <br />
      This is also a matter of where to draw the line and when is a reference sounding system rally a reference sounding system. I could have purchased a generator and run this system off the grid as well, but I didn't think that was required and I don't think the cable is mandatory in order to get reference quality sound.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <i>"9. A better computer power supply, better power cord and vibration control should improve audio playback."</i><br />
      <br />
      Al systems can be improved, but the possibility of improvement doesn't preclude a system from reference quality sound.<br />
      <br />
      <br />
      <br />
      Again, this response is not personal. It contains my honest responses to your comments. I've always enjoyed your candid comments around here and look forward to reading them again. I was a bit taken aback by your comments in this thread so please forgive my if my honesty seems a little to strong. <br />
      <br />
      Thanks audiozorro!
    1. znorter's Avatar
      znorter -
      <em>I installed the in_wave.dll add-on for AIFF support in MediaMonkey. The Output Plugin I use is wave_out.dll.</em>*<br />
      <br />
      ...maybe I have not understood: no more ASIO? Can you explain for the dummies like me, some more about the settings of MM?<br />
      <br />
      Thankx, Luca.<br />
      <br />
      *link are welcome
    1. The Computer Audiophile's Avatar
      The Computer Audiophile -
      Hi Luca - The ASIO plugin available from the Lynx site work just as well, but because the file is on a Japanese language website it can be difficult for people to download. So, I stuck with the wave_out.dll version and all was good. The settings are real easy. You just tell it to output to the audio card and disable volume control.