• iTunes

    by Published on 05-08-2012 11:55 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. iTunes,
    3. File Conversion

    The only constant in computer audio is change. Let me qualify that statement so as not to create discomfort among hesitant consumers. The only constant in computer audio, for early adopters and those seeking better solutions, is change. It's entirely possible to purchase a Mac, PC, or canned music server today and use it for the next five to ten years. But just because it's possible doesn't mean it's probable. As new servers, operating systems, and playback applications are released with better features and functionality consumer interest in changing solutions increases. Unfortunately switching servers isn't as simple as copying files or moving an external hard drive from one server to another. There are major incompatibilities between music server solutions. Some solutions like Olive Media servers don't allow users to export their music collections in a format usable by anything other than another Olive Media server. Other solutions like JRiver on a PC or the Aurender S10 Linux server support open standards such as FLAC that enable easy transitions to different platforms. The most problematic server switches involve Apple's iTunes, the most popular playback application in the world, and OS X operating system.
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    by Published on 04-10-2011 11:08 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. iTunes,
    3. OS X,
    4. File Conversion,
    5. Downloads / Streaming

    As the title says here's a how-to video with commentary explaining the process of converting high resolution FLAC files into AIFF files and adding them to iTunes. This is necessary because Apple's iTunes does not play FLAC files without third party applications. Some computer audiophiles can handle this activity in their sleep while others may not even download high resolution audio for fear of a FLAC attack. Only kidding no such thing exists, but the process is foreign to many Computer Audiophile readers. After watching this video all readers should be able to handle this conversion and library addition without any issues.
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    by Published on 05-18-2009 01:09 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. iTunes,
    3. OS X,
    4. Software,
    5. Basics

    The Computer Audiophile Academy is back in session with a little series about moving iTunes libraries and music from an old computer to a new computer. In addition to moving the library and music is a little primer on what the iTunes LIbrary is and how it's different from the iTunes music files / folder.
    Re-ripping music on a new computer is not the end of the world although it's highly undesirable. Worse than re-ripping is playing the role of music librarian if forced to add album art and tags to those re-ripped albums. That can literally take five times longer than ripping if a collection doesn't contain "popular" music.
    To simplify life for all the readers who've recently discussed this type of iTunes move I will publish videos demonstrating how to accomplish this without losing a single bit of information. There are a few reasonable combinations to cover in this series. For example, local library and local music files, local library with externally stored music files, and externally stored library with externally stored music files. This first video covers the local/local configuration. This is the most popular and default iTunes configuration.

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    by Published on 03-17-2009 04:01 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wireless,
    3. iTunes,
    4. Network Audio,
    5. Hardware

    In the second part of this series I discussed pushing music from a music server to another location in a residence using Apple Airport Express units. These work wonderful for playing the same music in every location as the Airport Express only follows the lead of the main music server. Playing different music in each location of a residence is a little different story, but it can be accomplished in much the same fashion. Substituting AppleTVs for the Airport Express units allows a listener to either push music from the main music server, the exact same way as an Airport Express, or pull music from the main music server independently of what's playing on the server. Plus, using an iPod Touch or iPhone this can all be controlled from a single location. ...
    by Published on 03-11-2009 02:59 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wireless,
    3. iTunes,
    4. Network Audio,
    5. Hardware

    In part two of the wireless music distribution series we get into the actual configuration of an Airport Express and iTunes to distribute music from the music server to another zone / room with AirTunes. Unfortunately the word configuration has a bad connotation when it comes to computers. Much of the time when people read the word configuration they immediately tune out and look for a canned solution that's plug n' play. Fortunately when working with most Apple components and applications the word configuration really means putting a check mark in a box and clicking OK. I'm happy to report that this is the case when enabling AirTunes. Here are some instructions and a video showing exactly how to complete this simple configuration. ...
    by Published on 03-08-2009 11:09 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Wireless,
    3. iTunes,
    4. Network Audio,
    5. Hardware

    Music distribution throughout a residence has been around as long as I can remember. This may say more about my age than the longevity of whole house music, but nonetheless we are not talking about a new concept. Traditional music distribution used a couple amplifiers and long analog cable runs that frequently suffered signal degradation. While this old-school method worked virtually every time it produced less than stellar sound at a less than stellar price. Today music distribution can be accomplished via ubiquitous wireless home networks and a couple Apple Airport Express units. The cost is greatly reduced and the sound quality is greatly improved when compared to the traditional music distribution systems. The convenience of having a complete music library accessible at the tap of an iPod Touch icon is an improvement over many systems available in the past. Plus it's even possible to turn the music on and off in individual zones from a single iPod Touch. This is the first part in a series of articles about distributing music throughout a residence. Part one provides a diagram and basic explanation of music distribution with a computer based music server. Subsequent articles in this series will show exactly how to configure iTunes and Airport Express units for music distribution as well as Apple TVs for selecting different music in each zone of the residence. ...
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