• The Computer Audiophile

    by Published on 03-27-2015 03:52 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Bits & Bytes
    Article Preview


    Yesterday Amazon launched its unlimited Cloud Drive and today Coppertino, the company who created the Vox music application for OS X, announced it will soon be releasing what it calls the Loop Music Locker. The Loop Music Locker is pretty cool in that it's built right into the Vox player, will upload nearly any type of lossless audio format including FLAC, APE, ALAC, AIFF, WAV, for a total of 43 formats, store unlimited amounts of data in the cloud, and enable users to stream this content in full lossless quality. In a way this is like a mix of Amazon Cloud Drive and TIDAL HIFI with the exception that it only contains the music one owns (no subscription music). Streaming from the cloud to the Vox Mac app and Vox iOS app are supported as is offline caching, just like TIDAL. Loop Music Locker will cost $49.99 per year or $4.99 per month.

    Readers looking for a peak at the beta version of the Loop Music Locker can sign up HERE. ...
    by Published on 03-26-2015 10:31 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Bits & Bytes

    Unlimited cloud storage for $59.99 per year is here! Thanks to CA reader joelha for bringing this to our attention! Here is the deal: Amazon Cloud Drive has recently enabled what it calls "Unlimited Everything." This allows people to store nearly any type of file on Amazon's cloud for less than $5 per month. The service also has tiers for unlimited photo storage and limited video storage, but for computer audiophiles this unlimited tier is fantastic. I just signed up for the three month free trial and am testing the upload right now. My recent switch to a Windows based NAS enables me to install Amazon's Cloud Drive uploading application right on the NAS. I simply selected the folders storing all my music and everything is uploading as I type. I have no plans to play the music directly from Amazon's cloud, but as a backup this is terrific. Currently Amazon supports access to the files from a number of mobile platforms as well as Windows and OS X desktops. ...
    by Published on 03-19-2015 01:10 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Software
    Article Preview



    Since the dawn of ripping CDs and downloading high resolution music people have been subjecting the files to audio analysis through applications such as Audacity and Adobe Audition. This type of analysis can be interesting when it reveals a high resolution album was simply upsampled from at 16 bit / 44.1 kHz version. A much more interesting, and more telling, indicator of sound quality can be seen when analyzing a track's waveform for dynamic range compression. Now that audiophiles are streaming lossless 16 bit / 44.1 kHz music from services such as TIDAL HIFI, Qobuz, and Deezer, the question of how to analyze this music becomes relevant. In the past we simply imported the file stored on our hard drive into one of the analysis applications and we had our answers. Because streaming services don't store music on our hard drives in the traditional ...
    by Published on 03-11-2015 12:10 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Network Audio
    Article Preview



    Warning: This article is technical in nature, but is far from rocket surgery. The step-by-step how-to instructions below make the process extremely easy. That said, this article isn't for everybody.

    This is the second article in the CA Geek Speak series (Link to first article ). If you have a USB DAC and want to turn it into a network capable device or if you want to setup multiple zones for playback and control via iPad for less than $100 per zone, then this article is for you. The instructions below provide a step-by-step guide for creating a UPnP / DLNA / OpenHome renderer with Ethernet input and USB output for connection to a USB DAC. In a way, this device can be considered the poor man's Auralic Aries (Review Link ) or SOtM sMS-100 Mini Server (Review Link ). In the previous Geek Speak article readers were forced to log in to the device and make configuration changes via command line. This time I've taken care of all the configuration myself. Readers simply need to download the preconfigured image file and flash it to a Beaglebone Black (Rev. C) following the instructions. That's it. ...
    by Published on 03-04-2015 09:40 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Bits & Bytes,
    3. Downloads / Streaming

    There's nothing like finding a new gem to listen to through your HiFi, headphones, or even car audio system. Well, here are 100 gems! The Computer Audiophile 100 is a playlist of music that I use for evaluating components at home and at audio shows. I selected TIDAL HIFI for this playlist because the service is lossless and the TIDAL HIFI library contains 99% of the music I wanted to put on the list. Subscribers of TIDAL HIFI can listen to the playlist in its entirety, add it to their favorites, and even download the tracks to a mobile device for offline listening. Those of you who aren't subscribers can sample each track and at least view the playlist to find out which tracks made the CA 100. This isn't an advertisement for TIDAL HIFI. The service made it so easy for me to compile and disseminate my playlist, that there was no way I was going to create a spreadsheet with manually entered links etc… This playlist is all about the music. I hope you enjoy and think about creating your own list to share with the members of the Computer Audiophile Community :~) ...
    by Published on 02-27-2015 09:10 AM
    1. Categories:
    2. Digital to Analog Converter,
    3. USB Interface,
    4. S/PDIF (RCA) Interface,
    5. AES/EBU Interface,
    6. S/PDIF (TosLink) Interface
    Article Preview



    I'm starting this review from a unique point of view. I purposely learned very little about the product under review before I started my listening sessions. I know the product is a DAC manufactured by Hegel and it says HD12 DSD on the front panel. I skimmed through the user manual to find out how to enable 24 bit / 192 kHz PCM and DSD playback and at the same time learned it's recommended to use the balanced analog outputs. Other than this information I have no clue how much this product costs, what DAC chip (if any) it uses, or where Hegel positions the DAC in its lineup of products. I don't know if I have an entry level or a flagship DAC. I even disabled the LED display on the unit while listening so I was looking at a small black box that gave me no visual cues that could sway my sonic impressions. Sure, I could have hired an assistant to unbox the DAC and place it behind a curtain until I wrote this review but life is about balance and I think I found a good balance between knowing everything about a product and not knowing anything, including how to use the product. I'm not a fan of blind testing audio components, rather I just wanted to have a little fun while reviewing this component and try writing from a different perspective. In a way I feel like a consumer entering an audio store without too much knowledge and looking for a DAC. The person at the store has told me to have a listen to this product from Hegel and we'll discuss the details after I'm done listening. With this in mind here are my sonic impressions of the Hegel HD12 DAC, followed by some information about the product (that I must look up after writing about my sonic impressions). ...
    Page 1 of 85 123451151 ... LastLast
  •